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Old July 5th, 2009, 03:22 PM   #621
ChrisZwolle
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A4 in Paris I believe...
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Old July 5th, 2009, 07:03 PM   #622
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Indeed, the A4 Paris-Strasbourg is the busiest motorway in its western part.
However the Peripherique (Paris inner beltway) is actually the busiest motorway of Europe (AADT around 1.2 million), although not exactly considered a motorway.
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Old July 5th, 2009, 07:10 PM   #623
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So the BP has 45 lanes? Otherwise 1.2 million is complete nonsense..
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Old July 5th, 2009, 07:18 PM   #624
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Actually, we had this discussion before.

The 1.2 million figure was from the entire Boulevard Peripherique, which is not the way traffic volumes are normally measured.

Usually, traffic volumes are measured between two interchanges. The BP has 6 to 10 lanes. My guess is most sections have between 150,000 and 200,000 AADT.
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Old July 5th, 2009, 07:18 PM   #625
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1.2 million is for the whole beltway. There is 32 km, car use it for 7 km in average.
In average the Peripherique is around 250,000 cars.

I think that we could find part where there is 300,000 cars per day.
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Old July 5th, 2009, 07:22 PM   #626
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Are there official stats for the BP online? They're hard to find, I have searched for them before.
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Old July 10th, 2009, 01:47 PM   #627
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Paris is rushing home for the Bastille Day long weekend (Quatorze Julliet)
[img]http://i26.************/24ezxa8.jpg[/img]
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Old July 10th, 2009, 09:20 PM   #628
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Traffic jams (in red) in Greater Paris at 8:10pm:





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Old July 10th, 2009, 09:26 PM   #629
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Greater Lyon at 8:20pm:


Greater Marseille:


Greater Toulouse:
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Old July 11th, 2009, 11:55 PM   #630
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Hi there!
here are some photos of the A8 motorway at the french riviera which i made during my vacation in southern france and italy

starting with a beautiful landscape near saint tropez:




back on the way to Ventimglia (I) on this fantastic motorway, Cannes/Grasse exit:







at Antibes:



the first toll plaza:



traffic is getting heavier ....









Nice:









what´s the time? ah


i like the french signage:



the next toll gate:





men at work ahead:




expensive cars.....




...monaco of course!



great view:




i hope thats not to much for you but i´m so impressed by this motorway...




Finally the french/italien border:


Last edited by GregfromAustria; July 12th, 2009 at 01:03 PM.
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Old July 12th, 2009, 04:49 AM   #631
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oh, it indeed is outrageous motorway! specific because of many toll gates, tunnels/viaducts and fantastic landscape. i remember lots of emergency exits for lorries with burnt brakes in that area.
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Old July 12th, 2009, 05:14 AM   #632
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Indeed, a beautiful motorway. The last time I was there, I was 6 y/o, so it's been ages!! Sometimes I wonder whether I shouldn't move there. After all they have the most gorgeous weather and landscape in Europe, much much better than either Paris or London. Ok, only 1 million people in the metro area, but such a gorgeous weather and landscape... I had a classmate from Nice who told me how he used to go running along the beach in T-shirt or very light jacket all year long...

Anyway, for an idea of how it looked before the motorway was built, here is the very famous N7 national highway from Paris to Italy. I'm posting pics of the section you took picture of (from St Tropez to the Italian border). This is how it would have been for you if you had driven there before the motorway was built.

The N7 right after Brignoles. The N7 was enlarged in the 1960s. To the left is the original N7 as it stood before the 1960s, and to the right is the N7 built in the 1960s:


The N7 crossing the town of Vidauban. It's hard to see on the picture, but the street to the right is actually the D48 road, and the sign on the building actually says "Saint-Tropez". Way to go if you wanted to reach Saint-Tropez, otherwise if you continued straight you would reach Nice after a couple more hours.



Continuing straight on the N7, you arrived after about 25 km in the ancient Roman port city of Fréjus. This is the first time that you were actually seeing the Mediterranean Sea since you had left Paris!



In Fréjus, the N7 ran next to the Via Augusta (the road from Rome to Marseille and Lyon).



After Fréjus you had to cross the Estérel mountain range, perhaps the most beautiful mountain range in France, with the N7 cutting its way between the mountain and the sea. The motorway now completely bypasses this beautiful area, and it's not as beautiful as driving on the old N7.



There are no less than 183 turns on the N7 as it crosses the Estérel moutain range, and since the motorway was opened in 1960, few people still drive these 183 turns. Before the motorway was opened, all the traffic went through that road, and it was almost impossible to pass cars due to the many turns, so it was a long traffic jam before reaching Cannes.



And finally, having crossed the Estérel, you arrived in Cannes, driving on the famous Croisette seaside boulevard where movie stars make famous appearances during the Cannes Film Festival. The Croisette was the only way to cross Cannes, there were no bypasses or motorways till 1960. You can see the Croisette and the Carlton Hotel on the picture.



After Cannes the N7 crossed Juan-les-Pins, the place where Napoleon landed in 1815 on his attempt to get back in power. The picture shows the N7 crossing Juan-les-Pins in 1963.



A few kilometers after Juan-les-Pins you crossed the Var River, which until 1860 marked the border between France and Piedmont-Sardinia, and then on the other bank of the Var River you finally reached Nice, entering the city by driving on the world-renowned Promenade des Anglais.





After Nice you basically had to cross the Alps as they plunge into the Mediterranean, the so-called Maritime Alps, to reach the Italian border, and this was (and still is) a spectacular journey. There were two roads to cross the Maritime Alps. One was the Grande Corniche ("Great Corniche"), the other was the Moyenne Corniche ("Middle Corniche"). The Grande Corniche is probably the most famous road in Europe. It is the road you see very often in TV commercials for luxury cars. The Grande Corniche was built by Napoleon I who had noticed how difficult it was to move troops from France to Italy during the French campaign in Italy in 1796 when his troops had to cross the Maritime Alps on the back of mules (there existed no road at the time).

The Grande Corniche is the highest above the Mediterranean, it's narrow and curvy, so between WW1 and WW2 the French authorities built the Moyenne Corniche, which is closer to sea-level, wider, and less curvy, but also less scenic than the mythical Grande Corniche. The N7 was going on the Grande Corniche till the Moyenne Corniche was built, then it was the Moyenne Corniche which became the N7.

Here is the Grande Corniche in the beginning of the 20th century.



The Grande Corniche goes more than 500 meters above sea-level, providing magnificent views of the Mediterranean. Here above the village of Eze.



At La Turbie, above Monaco, the Grande Corniche passed by the so called Trophy of Augustus, erected right on the border between Italy and Gaul by Emperor Augustus 20 centuries ago in the honor of his two grandsons .



The Moyenne Corniche is a bit less spectacular, but quite scenic nonetheless. This picture was taken from the Grande Corniche above the village of Eze, and the viaduct you can see below is the Moyenne Corniche.



The Moyenne Corniche in the 1960s near Monaco, with a tunnel carved in the rock of the mountain.



French tourists on the Moyenne Corniche just before Monaco in 1951.





Both corniches met in Menton, and just after Menton the N7 arrived at the border. End of the N7. Just after the building in the middle of the road starts l'Italia!

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Old July 12th, 2009, 07:38 AM   #633
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Wow France has some impressive highways, nice pics!
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Old July 12th, 2009, 01:05 PM   #634
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@brisavoine: thank you for those interesting old pics!
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Old July 12th, 2009, 02:22 PM   #635
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Grande Corniche still exist?
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Old July 12th, 2009, 02:45 PM   #636
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Are there any photos in existence of the A8 under construction? I've always been fascinated by all the bridges and tunnels of that autoroute!
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Old July 12th, 2009, 06:35 PM   #637
brisavoine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pijanec View Post
Grande Corniche still exist?
Of course it does. It goes on average 400 meters above sea-level. Its highest point is 512 meters above sea-level. It's much more beautiful than the motorway. In fact it is reputed as the most beautiful road in Europe.

The Grande Corniche is the uppermost road to the right of the picture:
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr




image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Monaco as seen from the Grande Corniche:
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Grande Corniche entering La Turbie, where the Trophy of Augustus stands on the historical border between Italy and Gaul:
image hosted on flickr


The Trophy of Augustus is still visible 2000 years after it was erected (you can compare with the 1900 picture that I posted above):
image hosted on flickr


That's the 1900 picture:


The Grande Corniche was a massive engineering project when it was built between 1805 and 1814 under the orders of Napoleon:
image hosted on flickr
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Old July 12th, 2009, 07:15 PM   #638
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oh i remember the wonderful view of this road.....it´s going trough "eze" as well, right?
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Old July 13th, 2009, 03:25 AM   #639
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GregfromAustria View Post
oh i remember the wonderful view of this road.....it´s going trough "eze" as well, right?
It goes above Eze (you can see the village of Eze several hundred meters down the road).
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Old July 13th, 2009, 04:16 AM   #640
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EDIT (too many pics on page)
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