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Old April 6th, 2010, 07:17 AM   #2301
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I want buy one of those machines
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Old April 6th, 2010, 08:20 AM   #2302
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Originally Posted by Peloso View Post
I love those megamachines... I also love the elevated railway construction method, I believe it's so much better for the environmental balance...
Are they actually building the entire line elevated like this?
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Old April 6th, 2010, 12:34 PM   #2303
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peloso View Post
Fastest answer ever, thanks Scion! Nice photos (careful to the dimensions of the fourth one, anyway).
I love those megamachines... I also love the elevated railway construction method, I believe it's so much better for the environmental balance...
Like Hkhui said, is there a projected completion date yet? They mentioned 2012, right?
Actually, the expected completion date has been pushed earlier by one year to 2011, according to this source:

http://sh.sina.com.cn/news/s/2009-03-07/0953108130.html. This is the source from which wikipedia got the 2011 date. wikipedia source
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Old April 6th, 2010, 01:29 PM   #2304
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Quote:
China on track to be world’s biggest network
By Jamil Anderlini in Beijing
Published: April 5 2010 20:14 | Last updated: April 5 2010 20:14


The Harmony Express is causing serious concern to China’s domestic airline carriers

As the Harmony Express pulls into the grimy railway station in China’s ancient capital of Xi’an, an army of blue-uniformed attendants busily begin polishing its gleaming, sleek exterior.

This is the face of modern rail in China and the latest addition to a burgeoning high-speed network that will be the biggest in the world within five years, according to the government’s blueprint.

The expansion plans are staggering: 30,000km of new track to be laid by the middle of the decade at a cost of as much as Rmb4,000bn ($586bn). The results are so impressive that the airline sector is looking on with trepidation.

China’s state-controlled carriers are emerging from years of losses and have refocused on the booming domestic travel market, but they are are faced with a potentially crippling threat from another arm of the state – the railway sector, led by the Ministry of Railways.

Liu Shaoyong, chairman of China Eastern Airlines, estimates that with high-speed lines under construction throughout China’s most populous and economically developed regions, as much as 60 per cent of the domestic commercial aviation market will be affected to some degree.

“[The high-speed rail network] will have a serious impact on the aviation market and will place direct and enduring pressure on the development of China’s airline companies,” Mr Liu says.

The effect has already been felt on the newly-opened route between Xi’an and Zhengzhou, 505km away in neighbouring Henan Province.

Joy Airlines, a subsidiary of China Eastern, and Kunpeng Airlines, a subsidiary of Air China, both previously offered regular flights but cancelled all services between the two cities within weeks of the maiden Harmony Express journey in February.

“The airlines have all cancelled their flights to and from Zhengzhou because there aren’t enough customers since the high-speed rail line opened,” says an official airline ticket vendor in Xi’an airport.

A trip on the Harmony Express (all of the country’s new 350km/h high-speed trains are part of the harmonious network) between Zhengzhou and Xi’an makes it clear why China’s airline bosses are so worried.

China’s railway stations are old and dirty and attract an array of thieves, pickpockets and scam artists but they are usually in the centre of town instead of far beyond the outskirts of a city where China’s cavernous airports are invariably built.

In the case of Xi’an and Zhengzhou and most other major cities in China, travellers who arrive at the airport must either wait for erratic bus services or stand in line for a taxi to drive more than one hour into town on a newly-built toll road.

Flights in China are almost always delayed and passengers must arrive early so that they can pass through rigorous security checks.

Once on the aircraft, the service is perfunctory, the toilets often filthy and the food barely edible.

In contrast, China’s shiny new high-speed trains are clean, fast, smooth and almost always on time. There are no excess baggage fees for heavy luggage, security checks are perfunctory and passengers can use their mobile phones.

Probably most concerning for airlines is that train tickets are significantly cheaper than airline tickets, especially when the additional costs of taxis and toll road fees are taken into account.

As the high-speed rail network grows, analysts expect airlines to pull off routes of 500km or less, while up to 40 per cent of air passengers travelling between 500km and 800km will switch to rail. This mirrors a similar trend in Europe over the past two decades as high-speed rail networks have expanded.

The potential impact on the Chinese airlines also raises questions about the viability of dozens of new airports under construction across the country.

As part of Beijing’s Rmb4,000bn economic stimulus package to battle the global economic crisis last year, China built and upgraded 22 airports. This year the government has budgeted at least Rmb90bn to expand and build a further 25 airports this year.

Plans to build another 60 airports over the next decade are partly a response to official predictions of passenger volume growth that starts to look wildly optimistic when the rise of high-speed rail is taken into account.

In 2009, about 230m people caught flights within China but the country’s civil aviation authority predicts that number will rise to 700m passengers by 2020 and double again to 1.4bn people by 2030.

But a significant proportion of those passengers could soon be catching the Harmony Express instead and wondering why they should ever put up with the inconvenience of flying in China again.
Quote:
Japanese rail chief hits at Beijing
By Jonathan Soble in Tokyo
Published: April 5 2010 20:02 | Last updated: April 6 2010 01:09
The chairman of Central Japan Railway, operator of Japan’s busiest bullet train link, has denounced China’s high-speed rail industry for “stealing” foreign technology and compromising safety.

Central Japan Railway, or JR Central, runs the Shinkansen high-speed link between Tokyo and the western city of Osaka, and is competing with China’s state railways for overseas business.

“The difference between China and Japan is that in Japan, if one passenger is injured or killed, the cost is prohibitively high,” Yoshiyuki Kasai told the Financial Times.

“It’s very serious. But China is a country where 10,000 passengers could die every year and no one would make a fuss.”

The competition between the companies is most intense in the US, where the Obama administration has earmarked $8bn for high-speed rail as part of its stimulus effort.

JR Central is targeting projects in Florida and Texas, as well as a proposed link between Los Angeles and Las Vegas that has drawn a Chinese bid.

JR Central designs and runs its own trains, though construction is contracted to engineering companies such as Kawasaki Heavy Industries.

Mr Kasai’s wariness of China’s rail industry is shared by other foreign executives.

Alstom of France has complained that Chinese companies are competing for export contracts using foreign technology.

Alstom and other manufacturers, such as Siemens of Germany, have piled into a domestic Chinese market where railway-related spending is expected to average $50bn a year between 2009 and 2013.

Foreign manufacturers must operate through local joint ventures, allowing, in some cases, their Chinese partners to absorb their technology.

Last month, Siemens dropped a bid to supply trains and equipment for the $7bn Mecca-to-Medina high-speed railway project in Saudi Arabia, instead joining a Chinese consortium bidding for the work.

Mr Kasai has not allowed JR Central to bid on contracts in China for fear its technology will be taken, though other Japanese rail groups have done business in the country.

Many trains on China’s Wuhan-Guangzhou and Beijing-Tianjin routes are based on models operated by East Japan Railway and built by Kawasaki.

Trains on those routes travel at up to 350kph, more than 25 per cent faster than Shinkansen trains in Japan, and have had no serious accidents.

But Mr Kasai said that the Chinese were driving the trains at much closer to their maximum safe speeds.

“I don’t think they are paying the same attention to safety that we are.

“Pushing it that close to the limit is something we would absolutely never do.”
Some news about Chinese railways from ft.com
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Old April 6th, 2010, 08:31 PM   #2305
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkhui View Post
Some news about Chinese railways from ft.com
Sounds like someone is whining about how the Chinese are beating them at their own game
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Old April 6th, 2010, 08:44 PM   #2306
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pictures above

Why is the Hydro Ministry building railways?
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Old April 6th, 2010, 10:43 PM   #2307
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K_ View Post
Are they actually building the entire line elevated like this?
Well I don't know for sure, judging from all the photos I've seen (also of the Wuhan-Guangzhou line) I'd say if not all, then long stretches of it are elevated, but there are many wiser forumers who could answer this better than me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by hkhui View Post
Actually, the expected completion date has been pushed earlier by one year to 2011, according to this source
That'd be great!
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Old April 6th, 2010, 11:02 PM   #2308
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nozumi 300 View Post
Sounds like someone is whining about how the Chinese are beating them at their own game
Definitely he is a cry baby. China even didn't start to sell the high speed rolling stock yet. What China is offering the tract building where they are probably better than Japan right now. They are teaming up with Siemens for the train sets and signaling. I want to see this guy when China really starts to sell the good stuff
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Old April 6th, 2010, 11:02 PM   #2309
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peloso View Post
Well I don't know for sure, judging from all the photos I've seen (also of the Wuhan-Guangzhou line) I'd say if not all, then long stretches of it are elevated, but there are many wiser forumers who could answer this better than me.
Yes, almost all of the line will be elevated
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Old April 7th, 2010, 12:10 AM   #2310
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Check out this great interactive graphics to see the map of present and future railway network in China!

Last updated 16 March
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Old April 7th, 2010, 09:53 AM   #2311
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxmulder View Post
Definitely he is a cry baby. China even didn't start to sell the high speed rolling stock yet. What China is offering the tract building where they are probably better than Japan right now. They are teaming up with Siemens for the train sets and signaling. I want to see this guy when China really starts to sell the good stuff
China has kept Alstom out of China's railway. How come the Alstom guy is complaining China of competing using their technology instead of Siemens?
How come the JR guy is not suing China if he thinks China is using their technology. Sounds like some jealousy here, because of China's own high-speed technology is better than Japan's.
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Old April 7th, 2010, 01:14 PM   #2312
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I doubt we could say it is undeniably better, but commercially attractive in worldwide bids is a different kettle of fish.
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Old April 7th, 2010, 04:47 PM   #2313
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peloso View Post
Well I don't know for sure, judging from all the photos I've seen (also of the Wuhan-Guangzhou line) I'd say if not all, then long stretches of it are elevated, but there are many wiser forumers who could answer this better than me.That'd be great!
Line is elevated in most parts to reduce intrusion on local farming communities and to minimize the reduction in avaliable farming space as irrigation can still take place under the tracks. It also allow free passage under the tracks as to reduce the dividing affect that the railway may have on local communities.

Elevated tracks also help to reduce noise pollution onto nearby residences.

It also reduces a safety concern as elevated tracks are much more difficult to access by local unkonwing people and wildlife.



now someone please answer my question per photos posted in previous pages. Why is the hydro department building railways?
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Old April 7th, 2010, 10:39 PM   #2314
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UD2 View Post
It also reduces a safety concern as elevated tracks are much more difficult to access by local unkonwing people and wildlife.
Not only that. To prevent access by wildlife a fence would suffice, with elevated track, though, migrations are allowed as well. In Europe I know of tracks at ground level where they left "holes" every X kilometers for the wildlife to cross, but that solves the problem only in part. I guess elevated tracks give added security against terrorism too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by UD2 View Post
now someone please answer my question per photos posted in previous pages. Why is the hydro department building railways?
Could it be the machine was simply "borrowed"?
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Old April 9th, 2010, 12:46 AM   #2315
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Old April 9th, 2010, 01:01 AM   #2316
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scion View Post
Here you go
Thanks for posting the pictures of the Shanghai - Beijing HSR construction.

Any pictures available of the new stations along the line that are being built, especially the Shanghai station near the airport?

Last edited by ANR; April 9th, 2010 at 01:02 AM. Reason: correction
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Old April 9th, 2010, 02:58 PM   #2317
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http://english.cctv.com/program/bizc...9/103013.shtml











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Last edited by Knuddel Knutsch; April 9th, 2010 at 03:05 PM.
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Old April 9th, 2010, 03:05 PM   #2318
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR View Post
Any pictures available of the new stations along the line that are being built, especially the Shanghai station near the airport?
The Shanghai Station is here in the Hongqiao traffic hub thread. Can't (yet) find pics on other stations along the line.

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=206
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Old April 9th, 2010, 03:14 PM   #2319
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Is there any hope for more maglev use in China, except the one from Shanghai-Hangzhou? Since the maglevs cannot be used on conventional tracks, I find it hard to see where else it can be used. Perhaps some intercity routes, but really it is the longer routes the maglev have the best utility.
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Old April 9th, 2010, 03:57 PM   #2320
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UD2 View Post
pictures above

Why is the Hydro Ministry building railways?
They probably have the equipment and expertise to build heavy concrete structures like these, think of dams and water channels...

*(to original poster): it's probably better not to post such large bandwidth clogging pictures like these, or find a smaller equivalent one.
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