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Old May 24th, 2010, 06:22 PM   #2681
makita09
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Yes its a biased article for sure. I think pretty much all of the statements about what is being done are broadly correct, but the bias is that it is all China's doing when it isn't, and is economical with the truth about other countries' capabilities. For example, Germany can only achieve 300km/h, when its German technology that got China to 350km/h in the first place.
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Old May 24th, 2010, 06:38 PM   #2682
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Riding the High-Speed Rails

China plans to double its high-speed railway network to make domestic transportation more convenient and efficient

By LAN XINZHEN
May 24, 2010
bjreview.com.cn

image hosted on flickr

A train roars along during the trial run of the Zhengzhou-Xi'an High-Speed Railway on January 25, 2010 (ZHANG XIAOLI)

Travel between Wuhan, capital of central China's Hubei Province, and Guangzhou, capital of Guangdong Province in south China, used to take 10 hours. But now, the 1,000-km journey can be made in three hours. When factoring in time spent getting to the airport and then waiting to board the aircraft, travel time between the two cities by air or rail is roughly the same. But the cost effectiveness of train travel trumps air transportation, luring a considerable number of people to stay grounded when traveling.

Trains have become the preferred transportation method of many travelers who used to travel by air, as high-speed railways cut both time and costs. The reduction in travel time comes from the debut of the Wuhan-Guangzhou High-Speed Railway which started operating on December 26, 2009, and has since become a major transportation artery from the heart of China to the southeast coastal areas. During the recent three-day May Day holiday, the high-speed railway transported nearly 270,000 passengers, a record high in train transportation between the two cities.

The Wuhan-Guangzhou corridor is also the longest high-speed railway in China—1,069 km in length. Other high-speed railways now in operation in the country include those from Beijing to Tianjin, Beijing to Taiyuan in Shanxi Province, Zhengzhou in Henan Province to Xi'an in Shaanxi Province and Hefei in Anhui Province to Shanghai. Figures from the Ministry of Railways (MOR) show the total length of high-speed railways currently in operation has reached 6,552 km, the longest in the world. In spite of the quick construction, more high-speed rails will be needed to cater to China's ever-increasing passenger demand. MOR figures state China plans to construct an additional 13,000 km of high-speed railways by 2012, bringing the high-speed railway network to just shy of 20,000 km.

Also by 2012, the majority of Chinese cities will be connected in the network as the nation enters an era of popularized high-speed railway demand.

image hosted on flickr


Years in the making

Development of China's high-speed rail network began in 2004, but the vision of the nation linked by fast trains is decades old. He Huawu, a 55-year-old MOR chief engineer, has witnessed that vision take shape and speed off over the course of his career. In 1992, He went to Europe for a field study of European railway development with an MOR delegation. During the trip, He took the Channel Tunnel, or the Eurotunnel, connecting Britain and France, the first time he had been on a high-speed railway running at 273 km per hour. At that time in China, trains could only travel at a maximum of 120 km per hour. He was amazed by the European talent in developing such fast transportation and wondered when China would catch up. China needed fast trains, but He had no idea of when or how long it would take to build high-speed railroads in his home country.

In the early 1990s, China's railway capacity could only meet half of the cargo transportation demand, which greatly restrained economic development. For years, China mulled the possibility of building a high-speed rail network, but protest was raised because of technology and capital constraints. The high-speed rail decision was slowed until 2004 when the Central Government determined China needed high-speed railways and pushed for railway technology innovation. The Central Government also ordered the construction of the first high-speed railway between Beijing and Tianjin and said it must be put into operation within five years. That year, He was appointed as chief engineer of MOR, taking charge of the design and construction of Chinese high-speed railways.

The first day in August 2008 marked the beginning of the high-speed rail era in China, as the Beijing-Tianjin Railway became operational one year earlier than scheduled. Soon thereafter, high-speed links sprouted up one after another across the country. At present, more than 10,000 km high-speed railways are under construction, connecting economically developed cities in eastern and central parts of the country. In April 2007, China increased the speed of trains by applying high technology, after which 2,876 trains could reach a maximum speed of 200-250 km per hour, the highest speed possible on existing railroads.

According to information provided by the MOR, high-speed railways are running smoothly with stable and reliable railroads, telecommunication signals, traction and power supply. MOR data show 773 high-speed trains travel across the country each day with a daily passenger transportation capacity of 845,000. The expanding network of high-speed railways has made travel more convenient, improved people's lives and relieved the pressure of insufficient capacity. Train cars with passengers packed in like canned sardines were widespread in the years before high-speed railways. But now, that common occurrence is becoming a fleeting memory of a slower past.

The Central Government has also adopted favorable policies to encourage railway development in terms of approval procedures, financing, land appraisal, environmental impact assessment, and research and development. Local governments have accordingly provided for the construction of high-speed railways, as they see such development as a strategic measure to boost local economic growth.

Across the nation


By 2020, according to MOR figures, China's high-speed railway network will extend over 50,000 km, connecting all provincial capitals and cities with populations exceeding 500,000 and providing 90 percent of the country's total population with access to rails. By that time, "China will build up a comprehensive railway network which will meet the demand of national economic and social development, and the passengers and cargoes will be able to be transported freely and conveniently without obstruction," said the MOR.

China laid out the blueprint for its high-speed railways in 2004 when the State Council, the cabinet, passed the Medium- and Long-term Railway Network Plan. According to the plan, the high-speed railway development will include four "north-south" lines and four "east-west" lines. The four "north-south" lines refer to railways that connect cities in northern and southern parts of China, including:
- the 1,318-km Beijing-Shanghai High-Speed Railway to connect the Bohai Sea Rim and the prosperous east coastal Yangtze River Delta regions
- the 2,350-km Beijing-Wuhan-Guangzhou-Shenzhen (Hong Kong) High-Speed Railway to connect north, central and south China
- the 1,612-km Beijing-Shenyang-Harbin (Dalian) High-Speed Railway to connect the northeastern and inner-Shanhaiguan Pass areas
- the 1,650-km Shanghai-Hangzhou-Ningbo-Fuzhou-Shenzhen High-Speed Railway to connect the Yangtze River Delta, southeast coastal areas and the Pearl River Delta.

The four "east-west" lines refer to high-speed railways running between eastern and western parts of China:
- the 906-km Qingdao-Shijiazhuang-Taiyuan line to connect the country's northern and eastern parts
- the 1,346-km Xuzhou-Zhengzhou-Lanzhou Railway to connect the northwestern and eastern regions
- 1,922-km Shanghai-Nanjing-Wuhan-Chongqing-Chengdu line to connect the southwestern and southeastern regions
- the 2,264-km Shanghai-Hangzhou-Nanchang-Changsha-Kunming railway to connect the central, eastern and southwestern regions.

The completion of the eight high-speed railways will connect China's major population hubs, making it possible for people to travel across the country with ease.

China also plans to develop inter-city high-speed railways covering economically developed and densely populated cities and towns, such as the Bobai Sea Rim, Yangtze River Delta, Chongqing and Chengdu areas and the west bank of the Taiwan Straits. Those inter-city rails will link relatively smaller cities and towns to the eight major high-speed railways.

The MOR plan shows the ultimate goal of China's high-speed railways is to form a one- to two-hour transportation network between neighboring provincial capital cities, and half- and one-hour transportation networks between provincial capital cities and other cities in the province. After the completion of these major railway lines, it will take no more than eight hours to travel from Beijing to the majority of provincial capitals.

High-Speed Projects

Existing railways:
With speeds reaching 350 km per hour
- Beijing-Tianjin: 120 km, started operating on August 1, 2008
- Wuhan-Guangzhou: 1,069 km, started operating on December 26, 2009
- Zhengzhou-Xi'an: 485 km, started operating on January 27, 2010

With speeds reaching 250 km per hour
- Hefei-Wuhan: 350 km in length, started operating on April 1, 2009
- Shijiazhuang-Taiyuan: 212 km, started operating on April 1, 2009
- Hefei-Nanjing: 166 km, started operating on April 18, 2009
- Jinan-Qingdao: 394 km, started operating on December 20, 2008
- Ningbo-Wenzhou: 268 km, started operating on September 28, 2009
- Wenzhou-Fuzhou: 302 km, started operating on September 28, 2009
- Fuzhou-Xiamen: 276 km, started operating on April 26, 2010

Railways under construction:
- Harbin-Dalian: to connect Harbin, Shenyang and Dalian in northeast China; speeds reaching 300-350 km per hour; 950 km in length; expected to be launched in 2013.
- Beijing-Shanghai: to connect Beijing and Shanghai via Jinan, Xuzhou and Nanjing; speeds reaching 350 km per hour; 1,318 km in length; expected to be launched in 2012.
- Beijing-Guangzhou: from Beijing to Guangzhou via Shijiazhuang, Zhengzhou, Wuhan and Changsha; 2,200 km in length; speeds reaching 250 km per hour. The Wuhan-Guangzhou section has already been put into operation. The rest of the line is expected to be completed in 2012.
- Shanghai-Shenzhen (southeast coastal railways): to connect Shanghai, Hangzhou, Ningbo, Fuzhou, Xiamen and Shenzhen; 1,650 km in length; speeds reaching 250 km per hour; expected to be completed in 2011.
- Qingdao-Taiyuan: to connect the east and the north, from Qingdao to Taiyuan via Shijiazhuang; 770 km in length; speeds reaching 250 km per hour. The Shijiazhuang-Taiyuan section and Qingdao-Jinan section have already been completed. The rest of the line will be finished by 2020.
- Xuzhou-Lanzhou: to connect Xuzhou, Zhengzhou, Xi'an and Lanzhou; 1,400 km in length; speeds reaching 250 km per hour. The Zhengzhou-Xi'an section has been put into operation, while a construction timeframe for the rest of the railway has yet to be determined.
- Shanghai-Chengdu (along the Yangtze River): to connect Shanghai, Nanjing, Hefei, Wuhan, Chongqing and Chengdu; 1,900 km in length; speeds reaching 200-350 km per hour. It will become a major transportation route from east to west China after its completion in 2011.
- Shanghai-Kunming: to connect Shanghai and Kunming via Hangzhou, Nanchang and Changsha; 2,264 km in length; speeds reaching 250 km per hour; expected to be put into operation in 2015.
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Old May 24th, 2010, 11:43 PM   #2683
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR View Post
....
Most of your post is just old-news. What I'd really like to know about the existing HSR lines would be:

1) What are the occupancy rates on each of these lines?

2) The nature and frequency of those reported technical problems the CRH3 and CRH2 on Wuguang line have run into.

Please, those with access to the good chinese railway fan sites, report some real news! (again CRH380 and CRH3-380 anyone?) We've read all the boring official Xinhua news articles.
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Old May 24th, 2010, 11:47 PM   #2684
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxmulder View Post
Thanks for the article. China has been a heaven for railway fans. Love the picture in this article. I saw it before but nice to see it again
Could you please stop re-quoting lengthy, old, and boring articles? It makes the scrolling difficult. Thanks.
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Old May 25th, 2010, 05:59 AM   #2685
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http://english.cri.cn/6909/2010/05/24/1901s571679.htm

Beijing residents who live along the proposed Beijing maglev line are protesting, as they fear health risk from electromagnetic radiation.
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Old May 25th, 2010, 06:22 PM   #2686
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Please keep this thread on topic, trolling-free, and stop abusing thread tags or I'll start brigging
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Old May 25th, 2010, 07:17 PM   #2687
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman View Post
Please keep this thread on topic, trolling-free, and stop abusing thread tags or I'll start brigging
Thank you for issuing this warning against trolls who flood this thread with useless flames. I appreciate that.
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Old May 25th, 2010, 07:21 PM   #2688
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Thank you for issuing this warning against trolls who flood this thread with useless flames. I appreciate that.
Errrr... You were one of the worst offenders
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Old May 25th, 2010, 07:25 PM   #2689
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Originally Posted by Tubeman View Post
Errrr... You were one of the worst offenders
No I am not.

Actually read through and I stick to the topics and discuss issues related to Chinese railway.

Have you seen me flaming others? No you haven't.

Do you see me posting valid news and see Chinese nationalists enraged by the negative portrayal of Chinese railway, which they regard as an insult to China motherland? Yes, that's exactly what you are seeing here.

You are confusing the negative reaction of Chinese nationalists against my perfectly valid criticism of Chinese railway industry with trolling. I am not responsible for the trolling by Chinese nationalists here.
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Old May 25th, 2010, 07:38 PM   #2690
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And there you go again... Fair enough, the brig for you... you were warned
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Old May 26th, 2010, 04:42 PM   #2691
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Photos from Railway Pavilion Shanghai Expo


Last edited by sasalove; May 30th, 2010 at 04:21 AM.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 06:58 PM   #2692
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I love the models, especially the train station. China-Europe HSR idea is also very interesting as we discussed in another topic. We'll see what it will turn into. Exciting days for HSR fans.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 07:10 PM   #2693
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sasalove View Post
...
Do you have any photos from the mock-up train in Jilin-Exhibition Hall at the Expo?
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Old May 26th, 2010, 09:05 PM   #2694
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Concerns about the benefits of Maglev rail
26 May 2010
China Daily - Hong Kong Edition

The controversial Maglev train project finally got its green light in Beijing.

The environmental assessment report of the Line S1 was publicized to solicit public opinion. Accompanying the report, however, is the timetable of the project. So the public cannot but question whether the authorities really care about what the public thinks.

In fact, residents along the planned line, worrying about the possible harm from radiation and noise, have already lodged a joint protest.

The Maglev train in Shanghai, put into operation in 2002, was the world's first Maglev in commercial operation. The 30-km line, with a gigantic cost of 10 billion yuan, is now deeply in deficit. Because of the high ticket prices, the annual passenger flow is only 20 percent of capacity.

Another Maglev train project, with a budget of 35 billion yuan, was canceled in Shanghai for fear of potential pollution.

Shanghai's Maglev should provide food for thought for any potential follower. Behind the advantages of Maglev - comfort, modern styling and efficiency, some questions should be answered.

First, does it harm the environment? How big is the impact of Maglev pollution? Such a question should be answered with concrete figures instead of empty talk. The worry of residents living along the line can be alleviated only when the environmental department conducts on-the-spot surveys and gives convincing figures.

Second, is it safe? Maglev has many more technical requirements than traditional rail. Its smooth operation, for example, depends on the stability of electric pressure. Can all the technical requirements be guaranteed?

Third, is it efficient? What is the budget of the planned project? It is reported that the planned S1 line has a low- and medium-speed, requiring a much smaller investment compared with the high-speed one in Shanghai. Still, the investment is by no means a small sum. It is known that Maglev trains have a high energy consumption and high maintenance costs. How much of that fee will future passengers shoulder for them?

Fourth, how many benefits will it bring to local residents?

What is the real purpose of building a Maglev line, to improve traffic or boost domestic consumption? Is it for social or economic benefit? If it really aims to improve traffic, will the fare be affordable to residents?

Furthermore, is it a must? Is there any other choice with a lower investment but mature and stable technology?

An assessment could not be deemed just and scientific if it fails to answer the above questions. The answers will make clear whether the project is for show or for the welfare of residents.

Excerpts from a comment that appeared in Beijing Times on May 25
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Old May 26th, 2010, 09:48 PM   #2695
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Quote:
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[size=4][B]
The environmental assessment report of the Line S1 was publicized to solicit public opinion. ...

Excerpts from a comment that appeared in Beijing Times on May 25
So the article talks about the low-speed maglev train to be adopted in Beijing's city-rail system? Why does it use the Shanghai Maglev line as example, without even mentioning the huge differences between the two?
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Old May 26th, 2010, 10:18 PM   #2696
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Any idea which Station?
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Old May 26th, 2010, 10:31 PM   #2697
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It's the Guangzhou South station.
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Old May 26th, 2010, 11:31 PM   #2698
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This is the mother of all transportation hubs, the Hongqiao Transport hub in western Shanghai. It adds a second airport terminal to the Hongqiao Airport which is mated with a huge train station for HSR and a Maglev express line to Pudong airport, and five metro lines. A transportation planner's dream.
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Old May 27th, 2010, 02:01 AM   #2699
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It's the Guangzhou South station.
What's the third level used for?
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Old May 27th, 2010, 02:58 AM   #2700
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What's the third level used for?
departure hall, platform and arrival
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