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Old June 2nd, 2010, 10:27 AM   #2781
Geography
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that's some kung fu sh*t right there
Right on.
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The trains, which China has the independent intellectual property rights of, will run for the first time on the Beijing-Shanghai high speed railway that is to be completed and opened in 2011.
I thought the Beijing-Shanghai HSR line opens in 2012, at least that is what Wikipedia says.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 11:33 AM   #2782
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Originally Posted by Geography View Post
Right on.

I thought the Beijing-Shanghai HSR line opens in 2012, at least that is what Wikipedia says.
Actually wikipedia is right. It is 2011. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beijing...xpress_Railway

2012 was the original completion year, but it has since been brought forward to 2011.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 11:40 AM   #2783
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The Beijing-shanghai highspeed railway opens in 2012?

Last edited by maldini; June 2nd, 2010 at 11:47 AM.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 01:30 PM   #2784
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The Beijing-shanghai highspeed railway opens in 2012?


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Old June 3rd, 2010, 05:56 PM   #2785
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Originally Posted by HyperMiler View Post
There is an incredible video of a Chinese rail worker dodging two CRH trains coming from both direction at full speed. An incredible video


CRH clip starts at 50 sec.

Look at closely you can see one of the train is ICE1 and the other one is ICE3, I think this is one of DB 's lines

But you won't care about it anyway
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 06:04 PM   #2786
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Track laying on Kahe Railway

Kahe Railway, Kashgar to Hotan, 488 km long, construction work started on July 3, 2008, it will open later this year

Map: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi...C%E7%B7%9A.png



Photos at http://bbs.ourail.com/viewthread.php?tid=70175










Last edited by yaohua2000; June 3rd, 2010 at 06:26 PM.
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 09:15 PM   #2787
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Interesting pictures, thanks for sharing.
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 09:18 PM   #2788
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Is it just me or rails in Kahe Railway doesn't look so straight?
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 11:18 PM   #2789
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Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Sarakhs crossing is said to have SUW2000 gauge change device. Does any border station of China have any gauge change facility?
There is a gauge change facility at each place where a railway line crosses
a border between China and any ex-USSR country. I know about two of them,
one between Almaty and Urumqi, and one east of Mongolia, whose name
escapes me right now. Both have a bogie changing facility, since there
are through passenger trains on both of them.
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Old June 4th, 2010, 01:21 AM   #2790
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Wall Street Journal Opinion Piece

China's Fast Track to Development
High-speed rail is about more than passengers. The new lines will free up valuable space for freight.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000..._LEFTTopBucket

By WILL FREEMAN AND ARTHUR KROEBER

The 350-kilometer-per-hour Wuguang Harmony Express rockets through China's heartland delivering passengers 1,000 kilometers from Wuhan to Guangzhou—roughly the distance between Washington, D.C. and Chicago—in just three hours. Outside, quintessential scenes of modern China unfold. Future urban districts populated only by cranes, the skeletons of concrete buildings and the cooling towers of coal-fired power plants rise out of fields of bright-yellow rapeseed dotted with the occasional dilapidated brick farmhouse.

Such glimpses of an agrarian country still in its initial stages of development make the state-of-the-art Wuguang Harmony Express seem an extravagant indulgence, an emblem of Beijing's obsession with infrastructure, regardless of cost or utility. Critics say China's mammoth high-speed passenger rail network (16,000 kilometers of which a quarter is complete) serves no useful purpose and will saddle the country with a crippling debt.

Such criticism is misguided. The high-speed rail program is not a desperate throw of gold-plated dice in response to the global financial crisis, but a carefully considered component of a long planned and desperately needed upgrade of China's rail system.

Building a high-speed rail network now is a good investment.

As incomes rise, China's passenger railroads will become by far the world's busiest. Moving passenger traffic off clogged conventional rail lines will free up room for an explosion of freight traffic, so increased freight revenue will pay the capital cost of building the new lines. And by reducing the need for airplanes, cars and trucks to carry passengers and freight, the system will yield big savings in energy intensity and carbon emissions.

China's rail system is already the most intensively used in the world. China carries a quarter of the world's rail freight and passenger traffic on only 6% of the world's track. China's intensity of rail use (passenger and freight combined) is double India's, triple that of the United States, and a dozen times Europe's. Over the next decade, China's Ministry of Railways expects freight carriage to rise 55%, while passenger-miles will double. More miles of track are not a luxury, but a necessity. In addition to the high-speed lines, the ministry plans to lay another 18,000 kilometers of new conventional freight and passenger track by 2020.

One objection is that high-speed lines cost far more to build than conventional lines. Maybe new passenger lines are not a luxury, but high-speed lines are.

Wrong again. In France, Spain or Japan a mile of high-speed track costs triple a conventional mile. But in China, according to World Bank estimates, the cost premium is as low as 20% to 30%. Cheap labor and locally produced equipment help; so does the decision to build much of the network on viaducts, minimizing land acquisition cost. Finally, building an entire network all at once produces massive economies of scale.

This modest cost premium translates into affordable ticket prices—higher than for conventional rail, but lower than for air travel. The average household income in China's 36 biggest cities is now more than $10,000, so tens of millions of Chinese can easily afford high-speed tickets, especially for business trips.

On several recent trips on the Nanjing-Wuhan, Wuhan-Guangzhou and Guangzhou-Shenzhen lines, we found the trains to be about 90% full. The World Bank reckons that in a few years' time the Beijing-Hong Kong line will carry more than 80 million passengers a year, becoming the world's busiest high-speed passenger rail line.

But the really big gain is that by moving most passenger traffic off existing conventional lines, more space is freed up for cargo. China's businesses—ranging from manufacturers to coal mines—have complained for years about the difficulty of securing space on freight trains, which forces them to move a lot of their cargo on more expensive and less efficient trucks. An increase in rail capacity will enable them to put their freight back on trains, generating huge savings. Ton for ton, freight carried by rail costs nearly 70% less than carriage by truck, uses 77% less energy and produces 91% less carbon dioxide emissions.

All well and good, but these benefits will accrue over many years. The cost of building the network is happening now, and is financed mainly by a huge run-up in debt. Isn't the financial risk too great?

Actually, no. For one thing, building the network now, when labor costs are still low, is smarter than waiting a decade or two, when higher wages will push the real cost far higher. And anyway, financing projects whose economic benefit takes a long time to emerge is precisely what debt is for.

That said, Beijing does need to diversify the sources of rail finance. MOR's liabilities rose by nearly 50% in 2009 to 1.3 trillion yuan ($190 billion), and it is near the limit of its ability prudently to issue more bonds. It has begun to get local governments to shoulder about one-third of the cost of building new lines, but direct budgetary support from the central government may also be required in the next five-year plan.

Yet this is hardly unusual—most countries with high-speed rail networks financed the capital construction mainly or entirely from budgetary funds. The bottom line is that, however it is financed, China's ambitious rail build-out is an investment well worth making.

Mr. Freeman is a research analyst and Mr. Kroeber is managing director at GaveKal Dragonomics, a Beijing-based research firm.
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Old June 4th, 2010, 07:13 AM   #2791
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One of the better articles about China's HSR development. Some very good points.
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Old June 4th, 2010, 10:11 AM   #2792
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I think the only point that the authors have missed is that the cost of land/property in most parts of China are still quite low.

In 10years time, railway construction costs could be double because of this.
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Old June 4th, 2010, 11:23 AM   #2793
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcVD View Post
There is a gauge change facility at each place where a railway line crosses
a border between China and any ex-USSR country. I know about two of them,
one between Almaty and Urumqi, and one east of Mongolia, whose name
escapes me right now. Both have a bogie changing facility, since there
are through passenger trains on both of them.
Yes, but these are bogie changing facilities.

The point of SUW2000 is that the bogies themselves can change gauge, but they need a facility on the track to accomplish this.
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Old June 4th, 2010, 02:20 PM   #2794
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Originally Posted by HyperMiler View Post
Is it just me or rails in Kahe Railway doesn't look so straight?
You are correct. The rails are straightened after the ballast has been added.
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Old June 5th, 2010, 01:11 AM   #2795
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I think this document from an Asian Development Bank audit of a resettlement plan for a new 1000km railway is fairly representative. There will always be resettlement problems, but the overall implementation appears positive.

http://www.adb.org/Documents/SEMRs/P...33/default.asp

I've excerpted a few of the summary paragraphs below:


9 Conclusion

"By the large amount of information and data collected, a conclusion can be made: regardless of cities or villages, regardless of immigrants affected by land acquisition, demolition and relocation, all have been resettled satisfactorily"

"The housing standards of the people affected by the land acquisition, demolition and relocation are, by large, better. The old adobes of most people were simple and crude, with no toilets, kitchen and the area is cramped. The Project has not only provided the affected villagers in villages a chance to reconstruct a new home using the relatively high compensation allocated by the resettlement department and their savings, but also to enable the people with low incomes or relatively lower living standards a chance and affordability to choose a new residence with even lower cost."


Section 12.1 107
"Compensation and resettlement for project affected people during land acquisition and housing removal are greatly emphasised. Settlement departments in most areas provided multiple land resettlement proposals..."
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Old June 5th, 2010, 01:40 AM   #2796
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Yes, but these are bogie changing facilities.

The point of SUW2000 is that the bogies themselves can change gauge, but they need a facility on the track to accomplish this.
Ooops, sorry, I missed your point. I'm mot aware that such an equipment
exists anywhere in China. And you're quite right to ask, those things should
go by two at least in that case, otherwise it's pointless.
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Old June 5th, 2010, 01:47 AM   #2797
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Restless View Post
I think the only point that the authors have missed is that the cost of land/property in most parts of China are still quite low.

In 10years time, railway construction costs could be double because of this.
A good reason for the chinese government to build its rail network now,
while
- the land needed to build it is still affordable
- all the available capital is not yet diverted to road construction

In 10 years from now it will be too late; so hurry up - that's pretty much
what they are doing, it seems...
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Old June 5th, 2010, 01:51 AM   #2798
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Regarding that excerpt above. It mentions only the pure material consequences. The sociological and emotional impact of some of these people being moved from where their families have lived for generations sometimes into a different way of life in larger towns goes way beyond any improvement in housing or monetary compensation they may receive.

I agree it is certainly for the greater good of the country, but I wouldn't like to be one of those people being forced to move. Needless to say many of these people will have benefited from these actions as well.
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Old June 5th, 2010, 05:25 AM   #2799
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Governments in other countries have to expropriate land for projects as well, causing people to have to move. It's not just a Chinese phenomenon, but obviously with the high population density in this country, especially in eastern provinces, more people are affected by infrastructure developments. It's unfortunate that some people have to move from ancestral land, but it doesn't just happen in this country, and it's an inevitable cost of development in any country.
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Old June 5th, 2010, 03:13 PM   #2800
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HyperMiler: very thin ice
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