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Old July 7th, 2010, 12:25 PM   #2921
Restless
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I think they now realise that they've screwed up with the timetable and also the pricing, so they've halted ticket sales until this has been revised.

The line was originally designed for 250km/h operation at current price levels, but they've since increased prices to the 350km/h level.

In addition, there isn't a time saving because they don't have enough direct services and Hongqiao station is a lot further away than Shanghai Station. Therefore they're changing the timetable.

It's nothing to do with safety

-------

http://life.globaltimes.cn/travel/2010-07/548701.html

By Train: sale of high-speed train tickets halt
Source: Global Times [08:55 July 06 2010]
By Chen Xiaoru

Just days after the launch of the new high-speed rail trains between Nanjing and Shanghai, railway authorities in the provincial capital of Jiangsu Province have suspended the sale of tickets to Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station and Shanghai Railway Station from Sunday onwards.

The move has some questioning why 4.89 billion yuan ($722.2 million) was invested into the Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station to develop the surrounding area into a local transportation hub, as passengers frustrated over the inconveniences of its suburban city location say the new high-speed rail route may not provide a more efficient way to travel.

Riders complain that the majority two-thirds of the 60 daily trains destined for the newly constructed Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station instead of the downtown Shanghai Railway Station make for an inconvenient commute with few public transport options available to bring them into the city center upon arriving.

"The Shanghai Railway Station is certainly more convenient for me," Fu Lefeng, a man who lives in Shanghai and frequently travels by train to Nanjing, told the Global Times Sunday. "The Hongqiao station lacks enough public transport nearby, so commuting from there is a hassle."

He added that taking the new, more expensive G-trains, which are priced at 146 yuan ($22) per economy class ticket - rather than the existing D-trains that take some hour longer to go the same distance, but costs 52 yuan ($7.6) less for the comparable fare - really saves him little in the end.

"The extra hour or so gained from taking the G-train is wasted by the time spent on traveling from Hongqiao to the city core," he said. "It's only actually worth taking the new high-speed train if I can get off at Shanghai Railway Station."

The head of operations for the Nanjing Railway Station told the Global Times Sunday that adjustments to the schedule will be made before sales resume.

But the woman who declined to disclose her name said that she could not say when that would be, nor could she provide further details on the matter.

The temporary suspension of the Shanghai-bound ticket sales comes after the high-speed trains connecting Shanghai and Nanjing, which travel faster than any other class of passenger rail trains in China at speeds of up to 350 kilometers per hour, halving commuting time between the two cities to 73 minutes, were put into motion on Thursday.

The opening night saw more than 3,000 passengers stuck in transit as the subway line 2, with an extension newly built for Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station, had already closed for the day by the time riders arrived to the city around 11 pm.

With fewer buses running on the outskirts of town in Hongqiao, some passengers were left stranded waiting for the subway to open the following morning, according to local media reporting.

Passengers who pull up at Shanghai Railway Station in Zhabei district downtown, however, have greater flexibility with subway lines 1,3 and 4 all within their reach.

According to Shi Lei, a professor of economics at Fudan University, public transport linking railway stations are of vital importance to urban development, and the incident involving over 3,000 passengers being left overnight at the station could be perceived as poor planning by transportation authorities.

"The media has been neglecting the fact that the reduced traveling time of some 70 minutes provided by the new direct high-speed trains between both cities does not include the time needed to travel to and from the new station," he said.

He added that the investments put into Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station have not proven their worth, at least not yet.

"If you take into consideration the additional time passengers need to travel to and from Hongqiao, it takes them roughly the same time as those taking the normal speed trains to Shanghai Railway Station," he said.

Authorities from both Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station and Shanghai Railway Bureau, which oversees train stations in the city, could not be reached for interview Sunday by the Global Times.

Meanwhile, officials plan on using the new Hongqiao station to launch more high-speed train routes in the future, including one linking Shanghai to Beijing by the end of next year, and another connecting the city to Chengdu by 2012.
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Old July 7th, 2010, 04:27 PM   #2922
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Some pics on the construction of the Beijing-Wuhan line, open 2011

















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Old July 7th, 2010, 04:54 PM   #2923
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It's just poor planning on Shanghai's side. A city with around 20 m inhabitants that is supposed to run 24/7 smoothly just cannot stop the metro running at midnight. This is totaly provincial. Even the U-Bahn in Hamburg with only 1.7 m inhabitants runs till 1 am during the week (night buses are provided on the same routes thenafter) and from Friday to Sunday the U-Bahn runs 24 h.
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Old July 7th, 2010, 06:43 PM   #2924
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Originally Posted by YelloPerilo View Post
It's just poor planning on Shanghai's side. A city with around 20 m inhabitants that is supposed to run 24/7 smoothly just cannot stop the metro running at midnight. This is totaly provincial. Even the U-Bahn in Hamburg with only 1.7 m inhabitants runs till 1 am during the week (night buses are provided on the same routes thenafter) and from Friday to Sunday the U-Bahn runs 24 h.
I don´t quite see it this way. 20m inhabitants does not rule out shutting down at night. Japan shuts down Shinkansen at night.

But the night shutdowns should then be planned as a whole. That is, the shutdown and startup times should be scheduled according to the shutdown times of destinations like airports and HSR stations, so as to strand nobody.

Does the airport of Hongqiao shut down at night for noise, or does it not?
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Old July 7th, 2010, 06:46 PM   #2925
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24-hour train service isn't a very common feature in big cities worldwide actually.
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Old July 7th, 2010, 06:51 PM   #2926
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China plans rail link to Pak

Alarm bells have started ringing in India over a proposed rail link that will connect China with Pakistan through Pakistan occupied Kashmir (PoK).

China is in advanced stages of discussions with Pakistan over the 700 km rail link and it is believed that details will be finalised during the current visit of Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari to China. What is even more worrisome for India is that fact that China and Pakistan have even discussed taking the rail link right upto the Arabian Sea in Pakistan.

In case an MoU is signed during the visit, Chinese companies will start exploring the engineering aspect of the project.

According to plans of the two countries, Pakistan and China will be responsible for laying of tracks in their own territories.

While India has already expressed displeasure at the development, China claims the link is necessary to clamp down on Chinese Islamist terrorists that operate out of Pakistan.

The 700 km rail link has been planned between Kashgar in China and Havelian in Pakistan across the Karakoram mountain ranges and the 4000 metre high Khunjareb pass in Pakistan.

Given the fact that the rail link will pass through PoK, India that claims sovereignty over all of Jammu & Kashmir has already expressed its reservations saying it cannot accept Chinese projects especially in parts of J&K under Pakistan's control.

China's other projects

This is not the first time that China has tried to encircle India with its projects.

- During the 1970s, it built the Karakoram highway between Xinjiang and northern Pakistan.

- Then, the railroad that connected the rest of China to TIbet's capital city Lhasa. China now wants to extend this railroad right up to Nepal.

- And now, the 700 km rail link from Kashgar in Xinjiang province to Havelian near Rawalpindi in northern Pakistan through Karakoram in Pakistan Occupied Kashmir.
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Old July 7th, 2010, 06:52 PM   #2927
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Turkey calls on China for strategic railway cooperation

Turkish Minister of Transportation Binali Yildirim proposed strategic cooperation to China for railways.

Minister Yildirim met with Chinese Minister of Railways Liu Zhijun in Beijing on Wednesday as part of his talks in China.

In his meeting with Zhijun, Minister Yildirim made a call on the governments of Turkey and China to turn cooperation in railways into a strategic cooperation.

As such, Yildirim said speed train railways would spread all across Turkey.

We must include financial packages as part of the cooperation, Yildirim noted.

It is high time to turn the Silk Road into a Silk Railway, Yildirim said.

Accordingly, a railway beginning from the far eastern point of China and extending to the Mediterranean coast of Turkey could be built and the duration of transportation (of both passengers and cargo) could go down significantly compared to maritime traffic, Yildirim said.

Minister Liu Zhijun said that the Chinese leadership wished to develop cooperation with Turkey.

Following their meeting, Yildirim and Zhijun signed a memorandum of understanding on development of bilateral cooperation in railways and spreading such cooperation onto third countries.
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Old July 7th, 2010, 06:53 PM   #2928
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China New Media Obtains Concession Rights to Operate Its First LED Screen in Tianjin

SOURCE: China New Media Corp.

DALIAN, China, Jul 7, 2010 (GlobeNewswire via COMTEX) -- China New Media Corp. /quotes/comstock/11k!cmdi (CMDI 2.00, 0.00, 0.00%) (the "Company"), a fast-growing advertising media company operating the largest outdoor media network in Dalian, China, today announced that it has obtained the contractual concession rights to install and operate a 22 square-meter indoor LED screen in Tianjin Railway Station from June 25, 2010 to August 25, 2014.

The LED screen will be installed at the intersection of the taxi and bus exits to maximize its visibility to travelers. In addition to the LED screen in Tianjin Railway Station, China New Media also operates advertising light boxes along the taxi exit and the waiting area. Tianjin Railway Station is one of the largest railway stations in China in terms of annual passenger volume.

"We are excited at the prospect of operating media platforms in Tianjin Railway Station for the next few years," stated James Wang, Chairman and CEO of China New Media Corp. "Following the closing of our LED acquisition in Shenyang, this long-term contract represents another step forward in our strategic expansion plan. This new contract further strengthens our business in Tianjin, one of the big four municipalities and largest coastal cities in North China. Looking forward, we will continue to pursue opportunities to further expand our media resources in China's first- and second-tier cities, especially in Beijing, Tianjin, Shanghai and Shenyang."

About China New Media Corp.

Founded in September 2000, China New Media Corp. is headquartered in Dalian, the commercial center of Northeastern China. The company owns and operates the city's largest outdoor media network encompassing over 600 bus shelters furnished with billboards and displays; 130 taxi stops with displays; and 13 large-size billboards, including 3 large-size LED displays at major traffic conjunctions. The company also furnishes more than 400 buses with advertising posters and 28 metro-trains throughout Dalian Metro Lines. China New Media provides comprehensive advertising services from art design to advertisement publishing, from daily maintenance to technical upgrading. Launched in Dalian in 2009, China New Media's proprietary LED multimedia display network, City Navigator(R), is one of the country's first web-based outdoor advertising networks.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release may contain certain "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements, other than statements of historical fact included herein are "forward-looking statements", including statements regarding the Company's ability to meet its obligations under its various contracts; the timeliness of payments and other economic benefits the Company expects to receive under such contracts; and the Company's ability to maintain its customer relationships and to maintain its ability to pursue its commercial objectives. In addition, the Company's operations are conducted in the PRC and, accordingly, are subject to special considerations and significant risks not typically associated with companies in North America and Western Europe such as risks associated with, among others, the political, economic and legal environment and foreign currency exchange. The Company's results may be adversely affected by changes in the political and social conditions in the PRC and by changes in governmental policies with respect to laws and regulations, anti-inflationary measures, currency conversion, remittances abroad, and rates and methods of taxation. These forward-looking statements are often identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "believes," "expects" or similar expressions, involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable, they do involve assumptions, risks and uncertainties, and these expectations may prove to be incorrect. Investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. The Company's actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of a variety of factors, including those discussed in the Company's periodic reports that are filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and available on its website at http://www.sec.gov. Other than as required under the securities laws, the Company does not assume a duty to update these forward-looking statements.
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Old July 7th, 2010, 07:24 PM   #2929
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
http://sh.sina.com.cn/news/s/2010-07-07/0807147939.html

Length: 160km
Speed: 350kmph
Travel time: 38 minutes
Train interval: 3 minutes

Now it's under track laying. It'll take only 38 minutes from Shanghai to hangzhou. I travelled to Hangzhou on weekend, the current CRH takes more than 1 hour.

Then which high speed lines are due to open this year?
Yichang-Yanzhou railway?
Shanghai-Hangzhou line as mentioned.
Longyan-Xiamen line?
Nanchang-Jiujiang line - sometime in the end of this month?

Guangzhou-Zhuhai MRT?
Haikou-Sanya eastern line?
Changchun-Jilin line?

Any others?
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Old July 8th, 2010, 12:01 AM   #2930
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There is nothing wrong with China building railways anywhere within its territories. India should just get used to it.
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Old July 8th, 2010, 12:31 AM   #2931
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Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
That's even scarier - to think there is a safety problem but they still run trains from now until the suspension date. That's quite wreckless disregard for life, and I doubt that's the underlying reason for the stoppage.
Hypothetically, how do you know they didn't stop service immediately after realization of the fault.

Since the route is still operational it is a null point anyway.
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Old July 8th, 2010, 12:31 AM   #2932
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pTaMo View Post
China plans rail link to Pak

Alarm bells have started ringing in India over a proposed rail link that will connect China with Pakistan through Pakistan occupied Kashmir (PoK).

China is in advanced stages of discussions with Pakistan over the 700 km rail link and it is believed that details will be finalised during the current visit of Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari to China. What is even more worrisome for India is that fact that China and Pakistan have even discussed taking the rail link right upto the Arabian Sea in Pakistan.

In case an MoU is signed during the visit, Chinese companies will start exploring the engineering aspect of the project.

According to plans of the two countries, Pakistan and China will be responsible for laying of tracks in their own territories.

While India has already expressed displeasure at the development, China claims the link is necessary to clamp down on Chinese Islamist terrorists that operate out of Pakistan.

The 700 km rail link has been planned between Kashgar in China and Havelian in Pakistan across the Karakoram mountain ranges and the 4000 metre high Khunjareb pass in Pakistan.

Given the fact that the rail link will pass through PoK, India that claims sovereignty over all of Jammu & Kashmir has already expressed its reservations saying it cannot accept Chinese projects especially in parts of J&K under Pakistan's control.

Very interesting project, although quite challenging. It is not the first time
that it is mentioned, but this is probably the first time that we are so close
of realization.

I do not understand why India feels threatened by this. The Karakorum
Highway is in the north part of Kashmir, that has been administered by
Pakistan since the british empire partition in 1947. The railway would
follow roughly the same route.

On the other hand, this new rail line might become the third rail link between
Europe and China. And if Pakistan agrees to build it with standard gauge, it
might become the first rail link betweem Europe and China that does not
require a break of gauge along the way.
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Old July 8th, 2010, 12:36 AM   #2933
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pTaMo View Post
China plans rail link to Pak

Alarm bells have started ringing in India over a proposed rail link that will connect China with Pakistan through Pakistan occupied Kashmir (PoK).

China is in advanced stages of discussions with Pakistan over the 700 km rail link and it is believed that details will be finalised during the current visit of Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari to China. What is even more worrisome for India is that fact that China and Pakistan have even discussed taking the rail link right upto the Arabian Sea in Pakistan.

In case an MoU is signed during the visit, Chinese companies will start exploring the engineering aspect of the project.

According to plans of the two countries, Pakistan and China will be responsible for laying of tracks in their own territories.

While India has already expressed displeasure at the development, China claims the link is necessary to clamp down on Chinese Islamist terrorists that operate out of Pakistan.

The 700 km rail link has been planned between Kashgar in China and Havelian in Pakistan across the Karakoram mountain ranges and the 4000 metre high Khunjareb pass in Pakistan.

Given the fact that the rail link will pass through PoK, India that claims sovereignty over all of Jammu & Kashmir has already expressed its reservations saying it cannot accept Chinese projects especially in parts of J&K under Pakistan's control.

China's other projects

This is not the first time that China has tried to encircle India with its projects.

- During the 1970s, it built the Karakoram highway between Xinjiang and northern Pakistan.

- Then, the railroad that connected the rest of China to TIbet's capital city Lhasa. China now wants to extend this railroad right up to Nepal.

- And now, the 700 km rail link from Kashgar in Xinjiang province to Havelian near Rawalpindi in northern Pakistan through Karakoram in Pakistan Occupied Kashmir.
Political controversies aside, this railway should present awesome sceneries above mighty mountains. It can be a very attractive touristic route.
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Old July 8th, 2010, 12:38 AM   #2934
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scion View Post


This one is nice. Tnx for sharing
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Old July 8th, 2010, 04:07 AM   #2935
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Not surprising that India would complain after they're putting money for infrastructure projects in territory China claims.
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Old July 8th, 2010, 05:00 AM   #2936
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Didn't expect this to happen so soon ...

High-speed link on a fast track to nowhere
6 July 2010
South China Morning Post

Sales of high-speed rail tickets between Shanghai and Nanjing will be suspended indefinitely from Saturday - just days after the multibillion-yuan link was launched amid a blaze of propaganda.

Rail authorities say the indefinite suspension will allow them to "optimise" the service. But the move appears to have been prompted by poor demand amid complaints about high ticket prices for a negligible saving in trip time.

The less-than-enthusiastic welcome to high-speed rail travel in the affluent Yangtze River Delta bodes ominously for the service's future nationwide, with links being constructed between major cities throughout the country.

It also calls into question feasibility studies carried out before the high-profile project was given the green light.

In an embarrassing climbdown for the Shanghai Railways Bureau, train ticket offices in the city yesterday displayed printed notices reading: "Following notification from above, the sale of high-speed rail tickets will be suspended from July 11, 2010, until further notice." Staff on duty said they had not been given any further explanation for the suspension.

The Shanghai-Nanjing link - part of a massive transport infrastructure upgrade spanning the Yangtze River Delta - was fast-tracked as part of the government's financial stimulus package and to help ferry tourists visiting the World Expo in Shanghai. It was launched on Thursday - exactly two years after work began - with headlines in local newspapers boasting it would cut journey times to as little as 73 minutes.

In reality, there is only one direct service per day in each direction scheduled to make the trip in that time, with a second completing the journey in 75 minutes.

Most trips stop at intervening cities and can take as long as two hours and seven minutes - just one minute quicker than the existing D-class express trains, which are much cheaper.

Standard-class, high-speed rail tickets from Shanghai to Nanjing cost 146 yuan, 57 per cent more than the 93 yuan it costs to buy a D-class ticket. Trains on the new route have a maximum speed of 350km/h, but do not actually reach that during commercial operations. Non-direct trains travel at around 200km/h for most of the route, only exceeding 300km/h for a few brief periods.

Shanghai rail officials have blamed the slower-than-anticipated speeds on the complicated route taken by the specially constructed line, which passes through the heart of a number of cities.

High-speed rail services ridden by South China Morning Post journalists on Thursday and during the weekend were reasonably busy but well below maximum capacity, with empty seats in most carriages. Shanghai media reported yesterday that 94,000 passengers travelled on the high-speed line on Thursday, followed by 138,000 on Friday and around 130,000 on Saturday. The city's official media portal, Eastday.com, reported that "close to half the seats were empty" on a Sunday service while "several hundred tickets remained unsold" for other trips that day. By contrast, D-class trains - which were cut back when the high-speed line went into service - were almost all fully booked.

No one at the Shanghai Railways Bureau could be reached for comment yesterday.

A Shanghai government spokesman said he was told that the bureau issued a press release on the ticket suspension yesterday afternoon. But, no notices relating to the decision were on the bureau's website by last night. Eastday quoted a Shanghai Railways Bureau spokesman as saying that the bureau was "taking stock of the situation during operations over in the past few days" in order to "optimise" the scheduling of the high-speed rail service.

Official plans for the Yangtze River Delta network - scheduled to be completed next year - had originally stated it would cut journey times to less than an hour between any of the region's three main cities - Shanghai, Nanjing and Hangzhou .

Officials also predicted that when the network eventually reached Beijing, the trip between Shanghai and the capital would take just five hours.

The experience of the Shanghai-Nanjing link casts doubt on just how realistic those times are.
BULLSHIT!
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Old July 8th, 2010, 07:28 AM   #2937
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very funny article. after the booking system resumed two days ago, "indefinite suspension" turned out to be just one day suspension due to the train schedule changes. and the change to cope with the "poor demand" is: additional to the existing 2 non-stop trains, 13 more non-stop trains were added to the service for each direction.

if one is to complain about this intercity rail, it is wiser to focus on asking the railway bureau to keep more options available, not the feasibility of this line--it will definitely be handy for a certain population, and that population won't be small. looks to me this article is on a track to nowhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Didn't expect this to happen so soon ...

High-speed link on a fast track to nowhere
6 July 2010
South China Morning Post

Sales of high-speed rail tickets between Shanghai and Nanjing will be suspended indefinitely from Saturday - just days after the multibillion-yuan link was launched amid a blaze of propaganda.

Rail authorities say the indefinite suspension will allow them to "optimise" the service. But the move appears to have been prompted by poor demand amid complaints about high ticket prices for a negligible saving in trip time.

The less-than-enthusiastic welcome to high-speed rail travel in the affluent Yangtze River Delta bodes ominously for the service's future nationwide, with links being constructed between major cities throughout the country.

It also calls into question feasibility studies carried out before the high-profile project was given the green light.

In an embarrassing climbdown for the Shanghai Railways Bureau, train ticket offices in the city yesterday displayed printed notices reading: "Following notification from above, the sale of high-speed rail tickets will be suspended from July 11, 2010, until further notice." Staff on duty said they had not been given any further explanation for the suspension.

The Shanghai-Nanjing link - part of a massive transport infrastructure upgrade spanning the Yangtze River Delta - was fast-tracked as part of the government's financial stimulus package and to help ferry tourists visiting the World Expo in Shanghai. It was launched on Thursday - exactly two years after work began - with headlines in local newspapers boasting it would cut journey times to as little as 73 minutes.

In reality, there is only one direct service per day in each direction scheduled to make the trip in that time, with a second completing the journey in 75 minutes.

Most trips stop at intervening cities and can take as long as two hours and seven minutes - just one minute quicker than the existing D-class express trains, which are much cheaper.

Standard-class, high-speed rail tickets from Shanghai to Nanjing cost 146 yuan, 57 per cent more than the 93 yuan it costs to buy a D-class ticket. Trains on the new route have a maximum speed of 350km/h, but do not actually reach that during commercial operations. Non-direct trains travel at around 200km/h for most of the route, only exceeding 300km/h for a few brief periods.

Shanghai rail officials have blamed the slower-than-anticipated speeds on the complicated route taken by the specially constructed line, which passes through the heart of a number of cities.

High-speed rail services ridden by South China Morning Post journalists on Thursday and during the weekend were reasonably busy but well below maximum capacity, with empty seats in most carriages. Shanghai media reported yesterday that 94,000 passengers travelled on the high-speed line on Thursday, followed by 138,000 on Friday and around 130,000 on Saturday. The city's official media portal, Eastday.com, reported that "close to half the seats were empty" on a Sunday service while "several hundred tickets remained unsold" for other trips that day. By contrast, D-class trains - which were cut back when the high-speed line went into service - were almost all fully booked.

No one at the Shanghai Railways Bureau could be reached for comment yesterday.

A Shanghai government spokesman said he was told that the bureau issued a press release on the ticket suspension yesterday afternoon. But, no notices relating to the decision were on the bureau's website by last night. Eastday quoted a Shanghai Railways Bureau spokesman as saying that the bureau was "taking stock of the situation during operations over in the past few days" in order to "optimise" the scheduling of the high-speed rail service.

Official plans for the Yangtze River Delta network - scheduled to be completed next year - had originally stated it would cut journey times to less than an hour between any of the region's three main cities - Shanghai, Nanjing and Hangzhou .

Officials also predicted that when the network eventually reached Beijing, the trip between Shanghai and the capital would take just five hours.

The experience of the Shanghai-Nanjing link casts doubt on just how realistic those times are.
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Old July 8th, 2010, 07:29 AM   #2938
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bold
Quote:
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BULLSHIT!
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Old July 8th, 2010, 09:09 AM   #2939
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Trains faster than 160 km/h (Updated: 2010-Jul-11)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fastest_trains_in_China

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Old July 8th, 2010, 10:19 PM   #2940
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sickasick View Post
very funny article. after the booking system resumed two days ago, "indefinite suspension" turned out to be just one day suspension due to the train schedule changes. and the change to cope with the "poor demand" is: additional to the existing 2 non-stop trains, 13 more non-stop trains were added to the service for each direction.

if one is to complain about this intercity rail, it is wiser to focus on asking the railway bureau to keep more options available, not the feasibility of this line--it will definitely be handy for a certain population, and that population won't be small. looks to me this article is on a track to nowhere.


+1
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