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Old July 16th, 2010, 04:23 PM   #2981
Taizu
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Chinese Enthralled by Pickersgill-Kaye's Lock Making Excellence

15 July 2010


Leading UK lock manufacturer Pickersgill-Kaye Ltd's successful export drive into the Far East has been officially recognised after the company was chosen for a visit from a high-powered Chinese trade mission on a fact-finding tour.

Several key figures from the Chinese Embassy, led by economic and commercial minister counsellor Mr Zhou Xiaoming, and the China Chamber of International Commerce visited Yorkshire businesses to get a better understanding of UK companies' potential for breaking into the difficult China market.

A joint China-Britain Business Council (CBBC) and UK Trade Investment (UKTI) initiative to promote the opportunities between the two nations, the itinerary included a tour of the highly-regarded Leeds engineering firm on 8 July 2010.

The Chinese visitors, along with UKTI deputy international trade director for Yorkshire and Humber, Graham Percival, were shown around Pickersgill-Kaye's Pepper Road facility by manufacturing manager Simon Barnes and quality manager Jeff Moore.

CBBC Director Giles Blackburne, who organised the tour, said, "We chose Pickersgill-Kaye because it is a great example of a British company exporting to China. Pickersgill-Kaye is successful because it has unique skills and experience and can manufacture high quality products that meet the specifications required by Chinese rail companies."

Following the tour, Mr Zhou said how impressed he was with the factory operation. He went on to discuss where the company might fit in the Chinese market and what opportunities and pitfalls they could encounter.

"Pickersgill Kaye is a specialist low volume manufacturer which can build licensing agreements with Chinese companies to avoid the cost of investing in new facilities," he said, and added an offer of help in promoting Pickersgill-Kaye products to Chinese companies.

Pickersgill-Kaye already supplies the lion's share of door locks and security systems to the UK rail market but a growing international reputation earned the breakthrough in the lucrative China market two years ago, when China National Rail (CNR) came calling about mechanical cab door locks for its locomotives.

Andy Hewitt, rail product sales manager, explained, "CNR heard of our capability for manufacturing cab door locks through work we had done with Bombardier, the global transportation company, in Canada."

In 2008, CNR ordered just 12 sets of locks in a deal worth around £40,000 for locomotives built at its massive Dalian manufacturing plant in north east China. They were so impressed with the product it was followed by another order last year for 50 sets worth nearly £180,000.

Because of this successful collaboration, the two companies are now in the middle of negotiations for 300 of Pickersgill-Kaye's cab door mechanical locks per year, either supplied from the UK or made under licence in China.

Mr Hewitt added, "CNR could have got the locks made in China at a tenth of the price, but Chinese manufacturers could not match the outstanding quality of our locks. The facility in Dalian alone turns out 500 locos a year – so you can imagine the huge potential for our products in China."

Pickersgill-Kaye's export boom has been spectacular. Fifteen years ago its only overseas customer was Irish Rail. Now it supplies high security custodial locks to the Malaysian police and continues to win orders in the rail sector from European companies including Siemens, Bombardier, Alstom, Irish Rail and CAF, in Asia from companies such as Jiwon Tech and Rotem in Korea, Ocean Eagle Holdings Ltd in Hong Kong and Hitachi in Japan, and in North America from companies such as Axion Technologies & Electro-Motive Diesels.

Backed by excellent levels of service and a solid reputation, the company is confident that it can continue to win new overseas business against stiff international competition.
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Old July 17th, 2010, 10:32 PM   #2982
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What's the latest word on the Shanghai-Hangzhou maglev? I heard it was finally canceled this year.
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Old July 18th, 2010, 08:26 PM   #2983
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Tracklaying on Beijing-Shanghai HSR Line to start today

http://news.xinhuanet.com/photo/2010...c_12345796.htm

Quote:
7月17日,中国铁建十四局集团京沪高铁铺轨工班的工人们正在铺设通道,为正式铺轨进行准备。京沪高铁先导试验段北段将于7月19日开始率先从徐州向蚌埠铺轨,南段将于8月中旬从南京向蚌埠铺轨,10月底将完成试验段铺轨。京沪高速铁路全长1318公里,全线纵贯京津沪三大直辖市和河北、山东、安徽、江苏四省,是我国目前最长的客运专线之一。





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Old July 19th, 2010, 12:10 AM   #2984
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I thought they have already started Anyway good news...
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Old July 19th, 2010, 02:37 AM   #2985
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the tracklaying occurs after they already built the concrete beds, this phase should only take a few months and then they can start testing!
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Old July 19th, 2010, 12:11 PM   #2986
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxmulder View Post
I thought they have already started Anyway good news...
Is the concrete and steel that they use for the foundation and railway tracks of the highest quality available?
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Old July 19th, 2010, 01:33 PM   #2987
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maldini View Post
Is the concrete and steel that they use for the foundation and railway tracks of the highest quality available?
More like of the highest quality necessary.
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Old July 19th, 2010, 06:29 PM   #2988
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it's very high quality, far surpassing the quality of any other high speed tracks in the world. though of course they wouldn't waste money on unnecessarily high quality like rebar ties and stuff like that, the rails are still multiple times stronger and more stable than those found elsewhere.
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Old July 20th, 2010, 01:11 PM   #2989
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Why do the rails look like severely rusted already? is that normal?
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Old July 20th, 2010, 03:28 PM   #2990
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I believe that is normal. It would just be surface rust.
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Old July 20th, 2010, 04:10 PM   #2991
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mingrady View Post
Why do the rails look like severely rusted already? is that normal?
it's normal, the rails were just stored on open air
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Old July 21st, 2010, 03:13 AM   #2992
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Any railway use stainless steel or alloy for making railway tracks?
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Old July 21st, 2010, 04:51 AM   #2993
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Quote:
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Any railway use stainless steel or alloy for making railway tracks?
Stainless steel is a soft metal not suited for application requiring to maintain structural integrity under stress.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 10:30 AM   #2994
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Yeah its normal. Old rails typically look grey, where the rust has been covered in fine dark material and rained on etc.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 10:35 AM   #2995
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Quote:
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Stainless steel is a soft metal not suited for application requiring to maintain structural integrity under stress.
...and by the way, strange that someone noticed the rust here, while I don't remember such a remark made about all the structural steel in the big towers (take Shanghai tower for example), although it is rusted exactly in the same way.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 11:44 AM   #2996
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Quote:
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...and by the way, strange that someone noticed the rust here, while I don't remember such a remark made about all the structural steel in the big towers (take Shanghai tower for example), although it is rusted exactly in the same way.
So the idea is that they will replace the existing tracks with new railway tracks, before the railway tracks become totally rusted?
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Old July 21st, 2010, 01:24 PM   #2997
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To my knowledge they should be oxidized turning into FeO(black rust) insted of FeO3(red rust) since FeO only covers the surface while FeO3 eats away into the core.
They are also method of treating with oil before shipment so it doesn't rust.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 04:50 PM   #2998
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tracks are sanded and polished prior to use. Rust will be gone.
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Old July 22nd, 2010, 12:54 AM   #2999
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tracks are sanded and polished prior to use. Rust will be gone.
But it will start to rust again soon after you polished it.
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Old July 22nd, 2010, 09:50 AM   #3000
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tracks are sanded and polished prior to use. Rust will be gone.
I doubt they do this, as it is completely pointless, and reduces the expected life of the rails.
The whole point of surface rust is to leave it on, as it protects the underlying steel from further oxydation.
Stainless steel by the way is also protected by "surface rust" from oxydation, as is aluminium. Only in these cases the rust looks different...
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