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Old July 29th, 2010, 05:16 PM   #3041
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Restless View Post
The bigger question is why no-one has bothered to profile CSR before?
IPR issues. Publicizing CSR means condoning its activities.
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Old July 29th, 2010, 05:45 PM   #3042
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seriously don't you learn, especially after getting banned twice? No one, including the moderators, wants you here, or your input.
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Old July 29th, 2010, 09:39 PM   #3043
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seriously don't you learn, especially after getting banned twice?
Well, that's the reason why I am not posting that accident news at Chinese high speed rail construction site.
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Old July 30th, 2010, 11:05 AM   #3044
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbaricManchurian View Post
seriously don't you learn, especially after getting banned twice? No one, including the moderators, wants you here, or your input.
+1
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Old July 30th, 2010, 11:19 AM   #3045
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbaricManchurian View Post
seriously don't you learn, especially after getting banned twice? No one, including the moderators, wants you here, or your input.
I want him here. He's provided me with much entertainment.
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Old July 30th, 2010, 05:41 PM   #3046
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CRH1 Series

derived from Bombardier Regina, Manufacturer by Bombardier Sifang (Qingdao) Transportation Ltd. (BST)

CRH1A: 8 cars per trainset, maximum speed 200km/h,first opend at Feburary 1, 2007, between Guangzhou - Shenzhen, currently 50 trainsets on service

CRH1B: 16 cars per trainset , maximum speed 250km/h,first opend at April 2009, between Shanghai - Nanjing, & South Shanghai - Hangzhou, currently 20 trainsets on service

CRH1E: 16 cars per trainset , maximum speed 250km/h,first opend at November 4 2009, between Beijing - Shanghai, currently 20 trainsets on service
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---





CRH2 Series

derived from E2 Series 1000 Shinkansen, Manufacturer by Sifang Locomotive and Rolling Stock

CRH2A: 8 cars per trainset, maximum speed 250km/h,first opend at January 28, 2007, between Shanghai - Hangzhou, currently 60 trainsets on service

CRH2B: 16 cars per trainset , maximum speed 250km/h,first opend at August 1 2008, between Hefei - Ningbo, currently 10 trainsets on service

CRH2C Stage one: 8 cars per trainset , maximum speed 350km/h,first opend at August 1 2008, between Beijing - Tianjin, currently 30 trainsets on service

CRH2C Stage two: 8 cars per trainset , maximum speed 350km/h,first opend at February 2010, between Zhengzhou - Xi'an, currently 30 trainsets on service, the new series CRH2-380 isderived from CRH2C Stage two

CRH2E: 16 cars per trainset , maximum speed 250km/h,first opend at December 21 2008, between Beijing - Shanghai & Beijing - Hangzhou, currently 20 trainsets on service
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---



CRH3 Series

derived from Siemens Velaro, Manufacturer at Tangshan Railway Vehicle

CRH3C: 8 cars per trainset, maximum speed 350km/h,first opend at August 1, 2008, between Beijing - Tianjin, currently 60 trainsets on service, planed to have 186 trainsets
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---


CRH5 Series

derived from Alstom Pendolino ETR600, Manufacturer by Changchun Railway Vehicles Co., Ltd

CRH5A: 8 cars per trainset, maximum speed 250km/h,first opend at July 1, 2008, between Beijing - Tianjin, currently 69 trainsets on service
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
[IMG]http://t3.************/images?q=tbn:pqMfvWvivkdtuM::&t=1&usg=__3aM-0K_2mFf1yNynGGXbIPkQlns=[/IMG]


CRH1-380 Series

Manufacturer by Bombardier Sifang (Qingdao) Transportation Ltd.

CRH1-380A, also named Zefiro 380, formerly known as CRH1C & CRH1D, 8 cars per trainset , maximum speed 380km/h, Will be on service at 2012, planned to manufacture 20 trainsets

CRH1-380B, 16 cars per trainset , maximum speed 380km/h, planned to manufacture 16 trainsets

[img]http://i26.************/9j18k7.jpg[/img]
CRH2-380 Series

Manufacturer by Sifang Locomotive and Rolling Stock

CRH2-380A, Based on CRH2C stage two, 8 cars per trainset , maximum speed 380km/h, the first CRH2-380A will be completed by August 2010, planned to manufacture 60 trainsets

CRH2-380B, 16 cars per trainset , maximum speed 380km/h, planned to manufacture 140 trainsets
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
[img]http://t1.************/images?q=tbn:1jthl8X-Y0oQGM::&t=1&usg=__NNrAu13qBMsXvu5eySfOlKhNUFc=[/img]
CRH3-380 Series

Manufacturer byt Tangshan Railway Vehicle & Changchun Railway Vehicles Co., Ltd

CRH3-380A, Formerly known as CRH3D, based on CRH3C, 16 cars per trainset , maximum speed 380km/h, the first CRH3-380A completed by May 27 2010, planned to manufacturer 100 trainsets
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Old July 30th, 2010, 06:13 PM   #3047
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Some of the old high-railway trains, AKA runs as "EXPERSS" at a speed of 180 to 200 km/h between late 1990s' and early 2000s'

CRH6 - NDJ3 - "GREATWALL"
Beijing - Yanqing (Open at 2008), Shijiazhuang - Qinhuangdao (open at 2009).



designed for running at 160 km/h, Top speed 200 km/h.

CBS - Changbai Mountain
Shenyang - Dalian (Open at 2007)



designed for running at 210 km/h, Top speed 250 km/h.

XF - Forward
Chengdu - Chongqing (Open at 2007)


designed for running at 200 km/h, Top speed 292 km/h.

DJJ1 - "Blue Arrow", Guangzhou - Shenzhen (Opens 2001, retire at 2007, now move to Shaoguan - Pingshi)


designed for running at 200 km/h, Top speed 236 km/h.


X2000 - Epoch Speed
opens at Guangzhou - Jiulong line in 1998 at 200km/h, retire in 2007,replaced by CRH1



DDJ1 - Great White Shark
Opens at Guangzhou -Shenzhen line in 1998 at 200 km/h, retire at 2001, replaced by Blue Arrow



DJJ2 - China Star
Runs between Shenyang - Shanhaiguan, opens at 2005 at 270km/h retire at 2007



DJF1 - Zhongyuan Star
Opens at Zhengzhou - Wuchan in 2001 at speed 160km/h, retired at 2007



NZJ1 - New First Light
Opens at Nanjing - Hangzhou & Shanghai -Nanjing in 1999 at speed 180 km/h, retire at 2007, now running ta Harbin - Qiqihar line at a speed of 160 km/h


NZJ2 - Shenzhou
nickname "Great White Cat", opens at Beijing - Tianjin in 2000, retire at 2007, now running between Guilin - Nanjing - Liuzhou & Nanchang - Wuchang, Chibi - huangshi, top speed 180 km/h

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Old July 31st, 2010, 02:28 AM   #3048
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by the way, according to this site, Nickname of the CRH Series are

http://baike.sytlw.com/index.php?doc-view-150.html

CRH1 - Cakebread
CRH2 - Hairtail
CRH3 - White Mouse
CRH5 - Little 5
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Old August 1st, 2010, 12:58 AM   #3049
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Old August 1st, 2010, 01:17 AM   #3050
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Progress with technique ! =)
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387 kupuj! Podrzi domacu privredu!
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Old August 1st, 2010, 04:56 PM   #3051
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Nice summary greenlion, tnx.
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Old August 3rd, 2010, 06:15 PM   #3052
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China's new industrial revolution

1 August 2010

In its race to provide future growth, the speed at which China is adopting new technologies is breathtaking.

Take one example: high speed rail.

Five years ago, there was not a single kilometre of high speed track in China. Today, it has more than Europe and by 2012, it will have more than the rest of the world put together.

A vast, spotless factory in the port city of Qingdao is in the front line of this new industrial revolution.

It is here that the giant state-controlled train-making company CSR developed a Chinese high-speed train.

China's leaders "played a strong role in making all of this happen", says CSR's chairman, Xiaogang Zhao.

Foreign know-how

China's leaders started by demanding that any foreign company bidding for a part of the massive proposed high-speed programme to share its technology with a Chinese partner.


The Japanese engineering giant Kawasaki accepted this condition. A pioneer of high-speed rail, with almost half a century of development to its name, Kawasaki agreed to share its knowledge with CSR.

Siemens of Germany struck a similar deal with another Chinese train-maker.

With access to foreign know-how secured, the government then provided an army of 10,000 engineers and academics to create a Chinese train, Mr Zhao explains.

They did it, he says, in less than three years.

New train

Inside the Qingdao factory, senior engineer Ding Sansan explains how every aspect of the Japanese train had to be redesigned for the faster 350 kilometres per hour running speed that China's high-speed strategy demanded.

Everyone worked so hard on the project that he can hardly remember his last holiday.

"It was a very big challenge", he says.

And it is just the beginning.

Mr Ding is now working on a new train, due to be tested next year at an astonishing 500 kilometres per hour.

Unacceptable condition

Having acquired the technology, China is already exporting it.

This year, CSR supplanted Siemens as lead contractor on a new 440 kilometre high-speed line in Saudi Arabia.


Outside China, the speed at which such leading-edge technologies are being adopted is causing concern.

But China now plans to go one step further.

Under a new proposal, "indigenous innovation", foreign companies bidding for Chinese government contracts will not only have to share existing know-how.

They will also be required to conduct any new research and development work in China.

For some companies this will prove an unacceptable condition, according to Brenda Foster, head of the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai.

"It will keep American companies from being able to compete in the Chinese domestic market," she says.

"For some companies, that could actually put them out of business."

Hindering ideas

While America and China argue over "indigenous innovation", China is taking a new, direct approach - encouraging highly-skilled Chinese-born expatriates to return home from overseas, bringing their ideas and expertise with them.

But some of these experts have found that China's top-down, centrally-controlled culture, so successful in delivering technologies such as high-speed rail, can prove an obstacle to innovation.

Top medical scientist Professor Guosong Liu, moved from America to take up a post at Tsinghua, China's leading scientific university.

There, the memory and intelligence-enhancing drugs he has been developing in the US and Germany are being tested on thousands of rats and mice.

Frightened students

For such meticulous, labour-intensive work, Professor Liu says, China's hierarchical culture is perfect.

But when it comes to innovation, "this culture inhibits the evolution of new ideas", he says.

Professor Liu finds his Chinese students to be very different from their American counterparts.

Where American students are active in the lecture hall and constantly challenge what they are told, Chinese respect for hierarchy and authority means that even at a top university such as Tsinghua, it is hard to generate creative debate, he explains.

"I always say there's no stupid question. Ask me something stupid - it's better than nothing", Professor Liu says.

"But they sit there. Maybe they're scared of me, but they're not challenging me".

Competitive edge

Another top scientific returnee, Professor Shi Yigong, shocked his colleagues at the top US university Princeton by turning down a $10m research grant to become Dean of Life Sciences at Tsinghua.

Professor Shi also believes China's hierarchical, top-down environment stifles creative debate.

"Every time you say something, you have to think whether what I said appeases my superior," he says.

"You begin to limit your innovation. I think you basically have less innovative factors in your mind".

Companies outside China may fear the break-neck speed at which China is adopting leading edge technologies.

But when it comes to new ideas and innovation, Professor Shi says, China's top-down, hierarchical culture means Europe and the US look likely to keep their competitive edge for some time yet.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-10792465
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Old August 4th, 2010, 02:27 AM   #3053
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China develops record-breaking 600kph maglev trains
By Quan Li (chinadaily.com.cn)
Updated: 2010-08-02 17:31

Maglev trains that reach a world record breaking speed of 600 kilometers per hour are being developed in China, the Beijing Times reported Monday.

The research, backed up by the theory of the vacuum magnetic suspension train, is being conducted by a state key laboratory research team of Southwest Jiaotong University, said the report. "The speed can be reached by making vacuum pipelines for maglev trains to run through, with no air resistance," said Shen Zhiyun, a member of the research team and an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Chinese Academy of Engineering.

The new technology will use less steel than a normal train and is expected to be put into operation after ten years, says Zhang Yaoping, a member of the research team, adding that the application also depends on the decision of the Ministry of Railways.

Currently, the high speed trains connecting the cities of Guangzhou and Wuhan travel at an average speed of 350 kilometres an hour.

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2...t_11083037.htm

Laboratory working on train to run at 1,000kph

CHINA is developing a vactrain which will travel at 1,000 kilometers per hour through maglev lines in tubes underground.

According to a national laboratory specializing in the study of traction, the technology could be in daily use in the next 10 years.

The laboratory at Southwest Jiaotong University told Beijing-based Legal Evening News that it was working on a prototype with an average speed of 500 to 600kph.

A much smaller model train traveling at 600 to 1,000kph in a vacuum tube will be introduced in two or three years, it added.

Shen Zhiyun, a member of Chinese Academy of Sciences and one of the lab's research fellows, said a maglev train could ride at astonishing speeds in an airless tube because of zero air friction.

Shen's colleague Zhang Yaoping is a friend of Daryl Oster, who holds the United States patent for Evacuated Tube Transport (ETT) technology.

Zhang, Shen and maglev expert Wang Jiasu launched their study in 2002. Oster came to China the same year to join the university's ETT institute.

Shen said the US proposal was for a highly evacuated tunnel. The Chinese version reduces air pressure, making the tunnel easier and cheaper to build.

The tunnel would cost 10 to 20 million yuan (US$2.95 million) more than the current high speed railway for each kilometer but the train would be able to travel at 600kph, Shen estimated.

http://www.shanghaidaily.com/sp/arti...cle_445162.htm
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Old August 4th, 2010, 03:26 AM   #3054
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I guess this reports may hint at least two airports of Shanghai will be connected with maglev at the end.
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Old August 4th, 2010, 07:41 PM   #3055
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Tianjin West station is undergoing a huge expansion in preparation for the Beijing-Shanghai HSR:

pics by me











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Old August 4th, 2010, 07:43 PM   #3056
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probably was a little overzealous with my pic taking, i walked into some worker dorms' courtyard because there was a diagram of the project there then got questioned by some security guards on the spot for a few mins, one of whom seemed to intentionally not understand my chinese (i say something and he's always like aaaaah? in a rising tone), then told to get lost without even getting the pic i wanted (the other one said "no picture" in english lol) :P
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Old August 5th, 2010, 05:54 AM   #3057
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Tianjin pictures

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Originally Posted by BarbaricManchurian View Post
probably was a little overzealous with my pic taking :P
Thanks for sharing the pictures. It is appreciated.
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Old August 5th, 2010, 07:14 AM   #3058
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbaricManchurian View Post
probably was a little overzealous with my pic taking, i walked into some worker dorms' courtyard because there was a diagram of the project there then got questioned by some security guards on the spot for a few mins, one of whom seemed to intentionally not understand my chinese (i say something and he's always like aaaaah? in a rising tone), then told to get lost without even getting the pic i wanted (the other one said "no picture" in english lol) :P
sorry to hear the story.. thanks for the pictures.
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Old August 5th, 2010, 06:41 PM   #3059
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The operation schedule of Shanghai-Nanjing HSR has been recently adjusted, again. To serve most of the passengers better, more trains from Shanghai Railway Station to Nanjing were added while some from Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station to Nanjing were cut. One thing concerning people the most has not be changed though: the fare.
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Old August 5th, 2010, 11:43 PM   #3060
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Some construction pictures of the Yellow River crossing at Zhengzhou for the Beijing-Shanhai high speed rail. Upper deck is a six lane expressway. Lower deck is for the trains. Looks like it is about to be completed. Images from netease.com.





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