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Old October 5th, 2010, 03:29 PM   #3481
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HyperMiler View Post
It is, 350 km/hr is the highest you can go with current generation of train models without causing too much wear and tear on the track.

To go faster, you need new train models with significant axle load reduction to reduce wear and tear.

Velaro CN can be driven to 395 km/hr right now, but what does that do to train and track? It's not sustainable.
But then it begs the question, how much is too much wear and tear? If the Chinese government is happy to pay the extra expenses required to maintain the tracks, wiring and trains more often to keep them within saftey margins, then it can't really be called "too much".
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Old October 5th, 2010, 04:33 PM   #3482
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
1 m/s² acceleration is quite practical to handle on trains. Sustain it for 2 minutes and you are at 432 km/h (the speed of Transrapid), having covered 7200 m. Sustain it for 4 minutes and you are at 864 km/h (near airplane cruise speed), having covered 28 800 m.
Well whilst we're on a mathematic theme, let me add my two cents with the power required.

As force = mass x acceleration and power = force x speed,
then power = mass x acceleration x speed.
(corrections welcome btw)

So for a 700t train, at a speed of 500km/h (or 138 m/s - two thirds to target speed) to have an acceleration of 1m/s/s requires a power of 97MW. To have the same acceleration all the way to 800kmh requires about 155MW. This does not include the power required to overcome friction, which needs to be added on top.

Whereas I think about 35-40MW would get the train to the target speed (in a vacuum), even if sacrificing a little acceleration at the top end.
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Old October 5th, 2010, 06:39 PM   #3483
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less maths and more updates please!
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Old October 5th, 2010, 09:06 PM   #3484
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Beijing South Railway Station







































PHOTO BY 京长直达Z61
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Last edited by Jiangwho; October 5th, 2010 at 09:15 PM.
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Old October 5th, 2010, 10:31 PM   #3485
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Beijing South Railway Station

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Originally Posted by Jiangwho View Post
Beijing South Railway Station
Wow - great photos - thanks for taking the effort to upload.
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Old October 5th, 2010, 11:19 PM   #3486
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Guys this may be a stupid question but why are there so less people in some of the stations that have been posted here? Is it because these pics were taken during/immediately after construction? What does rush hour look like. BTW really great pics. Thanks.
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Old October 5th, 2010, 11:20 PM   #3487
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Seconded - Jiangwho, lovely photos!
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Old October 6th, 2010, 12:15 AM   #3488
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codedj View Post
Guys this may be a stupid question but why are there so less people in some of the stations that have been posted here? Is it because these pics were taken during/immediately after construction? What does rush hour look like. BTW really great pics. Thanks.
Passengers are not allowed to be on the platform until 15 minutes (Beijing–Tianjin intercity trains) or 20–30 minutes (long-haul overnight sleeper trains) before departure.

There are 11 island platforms and 2 side platforms in the station, serving in total 24 tracks. In the photos, this part of the station is used by overnight trains from Beijing to Shanghai or Hangzhou. There are six of them every day, depart at 21:16, 21:21, 21:26, 21:36, 21:41, 21:46 respectively. If one take a photo before 20:45, there should not be any passengers there.
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Old October 6th, 2010, 12:36 AM   #3489
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Hi guys, you are Welcome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yaohua2000 View Post
Passengers are not allowed to be on the platform until 15 minutes (Beijing–Tianjin intercity trains) or 20–30 minutes (long-haul overnight sleeper trains) before departure.

There are 11 island platforms and 2 side platforms in the station, serving in total 24 tracks. In the photos, this part of the station is used by overnight trains from Beijing to Shanghai or Hangzhou. There are six of them every day, depart at 21:16, 21:21, 21:26, 21:36, 21:41, 21:46 respectively. If one take a photo before 20:45, there should not be any passengers there.
Indeed. Trains in the photos are all overnight sleeper trains.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 03:09 AM   #3490
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as of October 2, Frequency of CRH service at the 13 Chinese HSR lines, this table only listed CRH service, there is also traditional trains serving in some of the HSR lines

ICL- Intercity High-Speed Line
PDL- Passenger Designated Line
PFL- Mixed passenger & freight HSR line

Code:
Line                 Length   Trains per day speed level top speed     average speed     trains
                                 (aggregation)             (in 0perating) (by Fastest train)
Wuguang PDL           968 km       160         350km/h    348km/h       299.38km/h   CRH2C CRH3C
Huning PDL            296 km       170         350km/h    351km/h       243.29km/h   CRH1A/B CRH2A/B/C CRH3C  
Jingjin ICL           120 km       178         350km/h    355km/h       240km/h      CRH3C
Zhengxi PDL           455 km       18          350km/h    352km/h       233.33km/h   CRH2C
Yongtaiwen PFL        268 km       54          250km/h    253km/h       220.27km/h   CRH1B/E CRH2A/B/E
Wenfu PFL           298.4 km       40          250km/h    253km/h       215.71km/h   CRH1A/B/E CRH2A/B/E
Fuxia PFL           274.9 km       68          250km/h    252km/h       206.18km/h   CRH1A/B/E CRH2A/E
Shitai PDL            225 km       26          250km/h    233km/h       204.55km/h   CRH5A 
Hening PFL            156 km       24          250km/h    252km/h       173.33km/h   CRH1A/B CRH2A/B
Hewu PFL              351 km       20          250km/h    250km/h       175.5km/h    CRH1A/B CRH2A/B
Jiaoji PDL          362.5 km       42          250km/h    250km/h       163.53km/h   CRH2A CRH5A   
Chengguan PDL          67 km       40          220km/h    222km/h       134km/h      CRH1A
Changjiu ICL          135 km       34          250km/h    220km/h       188.37km/h   CRH1A CRH2A

Last edited by greenlion; October 7th, 2010 at 03:43 AM.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 03:28 AM   #3491
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Thanks a lot Jiangwho and greenlion
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Old October 7th, 2010, 05:53 AM   #3492
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Zefiro 380 - CRH380C at The international trade fair for transport technology, Berlin, Germany, the CHinese MOR had orderd 80 CRH380C trains in 2009 and according to most recently news, the first set eill be ready by 2011.


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Old October 7th, 2010, 06:58 AM   #3493
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Laos, China to cooperate in railway construction

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Minister for Railways of the People’s Republic of China, Mr Liu Kuayue, arrived in Vientiane on October 4 for talks with Lao officials on the construction of a railway from the Chinese border to Vientiane.

The railway development project is part of the Kunming-Singapore rail link, which aims to boost trade relations between Asean countries and China after the two parties implemented the Asean-China Free Trade Agreement earlier this year.

Mr Liu paid a courtesy visit to President Choummaly Sayasone and Standing Deputy Prime Minister Somsavat Lengsavad upon his arrival in Laos.

He also held talks and signed a memorandum of understanding with his Lao counterpart, Minister of Public Works and Transport Sommath Pholsena, on cooperation in the construction of the railway from the Lao-Chinese border in Luang Namtha province to Vientiane.

Mr Liu and his delegation also visited the Training Centre of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport, Thanalaeng train station, Vientiane-Nong Khai Friendship Bridge and the That Luang stupa.

Lao officials involved in the project told Vientiane Times that Laos and China would establish a joint venture to build the railway.

The Lao government plans to provide land as its share in the venture while the Chinese partner will provide funding for construction of the railway.

The Chinese government has promised to provide financial support for the joint venture to build the 400km railway.

The officials also said Laos and China are now carrying out a survey for the proposed railway, which they hope to complete before the end of this year.

“The survey will give us information about the cost of construction and where the track is to be laid,” a senior official from the Lao Ministry of Public Works and Transport told Vientiane Times.

Lao Railway Authority Deputy Director General, Mr Sompong Pholsena, told Vientiane Times earlier the railway would be able to accommodate medium speed electric trains, which can run at about 200km per hour. The highest speed trains can run at 350km per hour, he said.

According to officials from the Lao Ministry of Planning and Investment, the government has included the railway as one of the large-scale investment projects in its 2011-2015 socio-economic development plan.

The officials said construction would begin within the next five years. However, they were unable to confirm whether the project would be finished within this period of time, saying the decisive factor was funding and cooperation from other Asean countries.

The Chinese government has a clear policy to invest in the construction of an Asean-China railway as a means to boost trade between the two sides. China has said it will cooperate with the Thai government to build the railway.

The Thai government has agreed to cooperate with China to build the railway from the Lao-Thai border in Nong Khai province to Bangkok. However, the Thai government will not be able implement the project until it gets approval from Parliament.

At present Laos’ only railway is a 3.5km track running from the Vientiane-Nong Khai Friendship Bridge to Thanalaeng station on the outskirts of Vientiane.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 07:14 AM   #3494
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenlion View Post
Zefiro 380 - CRH380C at The international trade fair for transport technology, Berlin, Germany, the CHinese MOR had orderd 80 CRH380C trains in 2009 and according to most recently news, the first set eill be ready by 2011.



Thanks so much for the update greenlion. The red looks really good on the train, hopefully there will be a use for it.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 07:24 AM   #3495
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yaohua2000 View Post
Laos, China to cooperate in railway construction
Quote:
Minister for Railways of the People’s Republic of China, Mr Liu Kuayue
please tell me this is not a formal report. otherwise
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Old October 7th, 2010, 07:35 AM   #3496
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nozumi 300 View Post

Thanks so much for the update greenlion. The red looks really good on the train, hopefully there will be a use for it.
the color will probably be changed. they will paint the three big Chinese characters there too.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 07:37 AM   #3497
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenlion View Post
Zefiro 380 - CRH380C at The international trade fair for transport technology, Berlin, Germany, the CHinese MOR had orderd 80 CRH380C trains in 2009 and according to most recently news, the first set eill be ready by 2011.
Amazing machine.

Do they assign each type of CRH380 to a specific line? For example CRH380A for Beijing Shanghai and 380C for Beijing-Wuhan or there will be a pool of 380km/h capable trains running where ever required.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 11:46 AM   #3498
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Lao Railway Authority Deputy Director General, Mr Sompong Pholsena, told Vientiane Times earlier the railway would be able to accommodate medium speed electric trains, which can run at about 200km per hour. The highest speed trains can run at 350km per hour, he said.
When, on 20th of November, Yichang-Wanzhou railway shall open, how long shall the trip take?
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Old October 7th, 2010, 04:18 PM   #3499
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It's look Enviromental and Economically

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Originally Posted by greenlion View Post
Z


The Train It's look Enviromental and Economically as the design look's unique among other high speed train and more futuristic feature for next generation of high speed train in the world.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 08:31 PM   #3500
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Mount Everest is singing for joy
Everyone else is worried

http://www.economist.com/node/17204635

Quote:
“MOUNT EVEREST is singing for joy and the Brahmaputra River swirling with happiness”. Or so says an official Chinese newspaper (using the Tibetan names, Qomolangma and the Yarlung Tsangpo). After much delay, China has started to extend its controversial railway line in Tibet that will draw more tourists to the mountain and boost trade with South Asia. How happy the outcome will be is not so clear.

Planning for the 253km (157-mile) line from the Tibetan capital, Lhasa, to the region’s second city, Shigatse, began in 2002, four years before Lhasa itself was connected to China’s railway network. The authorities appear not have been deterred by the problems that the railway brought to Lhasa. A tourism boom and a flood of immigrants from China’s interior contributed to an explosion of unrest among embittered Tibetans in March 2008. The launch ceremony in Lhasa of the $2 billion extension on September 26th was celebrated by dancing children in elaborate Tibetan costumes. Chinese television said the line would be of “great significance for the strengthening of ethnic unity”.

Like the route to Lhasa, which crossed the highest terrain of any railway in the world, the single-track extension will involve considerable technical difficulties. Nearly half of it will go through tunnels or over bridges (96 of them). It will cross areas prone to earthquakes, landslides and sand storms. Whereas the line to Lhasa had to traverse unstable permafrost, the new one will be challenged by geothermal fields with hot springs. All this at an oxygen-starved altitude of 3,550-4,000 metres.

The railway will make it easier to reach Mount Everest, which can expect to see a lot more tourists eager to be photographed in front of the world’s highest peak (Shigatse is also due to open an airport soon, Tibet’s fifth for civilian use). In 2007 the Chinese side of the mountain recorded 27,476 visits by Chinese tourists, almost twice as many as in 2006, after the new rail service to Lhasa had opened. Environmentalists are worried.

So are the Indians. The government in Delhi has been nervously watching China’s build-up of infrastructure in Tibet. The extension to Shigatse, besides facilitating military movements near China’s border with India, is likely to boost trade with Nepal, where the two giants are vying for influence in a power struggle that is still going on. China has long-term plans for more extensions of the line, to Nyalam on the border with Nepal and to Dromo near Bhutan and the Indian state of Sikkim. Nepal wants the railway extended to Kathmandu, which India fears would give China more clout in a country India sees as part of its sphere of influence. Another proposed line, from Lhasa east to Nyingchi, would bring the network close to the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, which most of China claims.

Tibetans might have mixed feelings too. The rail link to Lhasa brought disproportionate benefits to ethnic Han Chinese whose language and culture enabled them to take quicker advantage of the Han tourist influx. Tibet Business News said the majority of traders in Shigatse were migrants from beyond Tibet. It quoted a woman from neighbouring Sichuan Province saying that the railway would cut her costs of doing business in Shigatse by half. Expect more like her to come.


And some interesting comments:

Quote:
Once again, the Economist is degrading itself to be an activist tabloid.

In fact, many people will be happy about the railway extension.

The Nepalese will be the most happy. After all, the Nepalese leaders were the ones pushing China really hard to extend the Qinghai-Tibet railway. The rail extension will mean more tourists, businessmen, and revenues for the impoverished Nepalese.

Many Sikkimese businessmen will be happy, too. The Natula Pass was opened several years ago but trade volumes remained small. If a direct rail link between China and India is implemented via Sikkim, growing trade will benefit a lot of local people, both on the Sikkim and the Tibet side. Well, if the Indians are up to the engineering challenge.

But the biggest beneficiary will be the local Tibetan population. Granted, more Han tourists will come. but it also means the local Tibetan population will have a chance to visit other parts of China cheaply and open up their horizons and give them more opportunities.

Of course, the Economist and many westerners won't like it simply because they want the Tibetans to be locked up in a medieval-age state of mind, so that the entire TAR will serve as an anthropology museum for the adventure-seeking westerners and make them feel superior.

Sorry to disappoint you guys! But a kind reminder that this is the 21th century, not the 19th century when the British troops can bully any other country in the world. Just indulge your nostalgia for the empire on the British isles, or better, in the CWG village.
Quote:
Absolutely, India cannot allow Nepal, China, or any other country to develop. If they do, India will be the only country left in the world with sub-Sahara living standards. It will be a lonely life in the dumps. We should persuade the Chinese not to built rails, roads, and ports in their own countries, or any where else in the world and our neighborhood, by the force of arms and democratically of course, if necessary. With so many 1-dollar-a-day companions, we can continue to day-dream in the glory of mutual poverty in our neighborhood, and bask in our greatest democracy and greatest only remaining super power glory. India shines while the world declines.

No wonder India is the greatest democracy and greatest only remaining super power.

Submit to your fate under our Hindu colossus, beg our 5 rupee meal middle classes, bow to our super powers.

Last edited by yaohua2000; October 7th, 2010 at 08:42 PM.
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