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Old February 13th, 2011, 03:40 AM   #4321
Pansori
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Since this is the only place I can ask about railways in China, I was wondering what are the rail options to get from Guangzhou to Macau? I checked the Guangzhou South-Zhuhai route on the timetable which seems fine (and it takes just 45 minutes with a G train) but is it the best way of getting from GZ to Macau or is it more efficient to take a bus?
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Old February 13th, 2011, 04:05 AM   #4322
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pansori View Post
Since this is the only place I can ask about railways in China, I was wondering what are the rail options to get from Guangzhou to Macau? I checked the Guangzhou South-Zhuhai route on the timetable which seems fine (and it takes just 45 minutes with a G train) but is it the best way of getting from GZ to Macau or is it more efficient to take a bus?
Zhuhai North station is very far away from Zhuhai city. There will be a station near the border, but yet to open. You can take the train anyway, a taxi ride from Zhuhai North Station to Macau border should cost around ¥80 without traffic, or there is also a city bus to urban Zhuhai (not the border, need another transfer) right outside of the Zhuhai North Station.
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Old February 13th, 2011, 11:43 AM   #4323
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Originally Posted by yaohua2000 View Post
Zhuhai North station is very far away from Zhuhai city. There will be a station near the border, but yet to open.
Which ones?
The stations beyond Zhuhai North are Tangjiawan, Mingzhu, Qianshan, Zhuhai, Wanzai, Xiawan, Lianhua, Hengqin, Hezhou South, Sanzao, Zhuhai Airport.

Which of these is nearest to Macao border?

When shall Guangzhou-Zhuhai railway open past Zhuhai North?
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Old February 13th, 2011, 04:41 PM   #4324
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Which ones?
The stations beyond Zhuhai North are Tangjiawan, Mingzhu, Qianshan, Zhuhai, Wanzai, Xiawan, Lianhua, Hengqin, Hezhou South, Sanzao, Zhuhai Airport.

Which of these is nearest to Macao border?

When shall Guangzhou-Zhuhai railway open past Zhuhai North?
Zhuhai North is closest to Macau, but eventually the line will be extended to the border.
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Old February 13th, 2011, 05:18 PM   #4325
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China has some amazing train stations! Its a "MUST" if you visit the country.
I hope i will once
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Old February 13th, 2011, 09:40 PM   #4326
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geography View Post
Wow, this is big news. "Severe violation of discipline" sounds like either a sex scandal or embezzlement. His railway policies have been repeatedly endorsed by the CCP and top party leaders and trumpeted around the world with national pride.

China watchers, any idea when, if ever, we'll find out why he was dismissed?
I suspect it's actually a turf war. It can't be corruption or sex scandal, since all of them are corrupt. Perhaps he was amassing too much power and threatening the established factions. Generally they won't throw people under the bus so openly.
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Old February 14th, 2011, 03:14 AM   #4327
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Originally Posted by urbanfan89 View Post
I suspect it's actually a turf war. It can't be corruption or sex scandal, since all of them are corrupt. Perhaps he was amassing too much power and threatening the established factions. Generally they won't throw people under the bus so openly.
This is one of the most powerful men in China's ruling party.

On another note, with this dude gone, the Maglev projects in Shanghai might recieve new life.


Severe violations of discpline means taking bribes of large amount. The quantitative understanding of the word large will be determined by the party. But yeah, he must have pissed off somebody in the central committee.
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Last edited by UD2; February 14th, 2011 at 09:57 AM.
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Old February 14th, 2011, 08:24 AM   #4328
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I too think this is more of a inner-party dispute. It doesn't have much to do with him taking bribes or having affairs, but rather he pissed off some other high-ranking party officials so they decided to politacally kill him.

Nothing to worry about. Happens all the time, everywhere
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Old February 14th, 2011, 08:56 AM   #4329
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New Minister?

How long does it normally take in China to replace a minister fired and detained for serious breaches of discipline? Can we expect prolonged confusion, or are "serious breaches of discipline" normally announced after (and because) a successor has been agreed upon?
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Old February 14th, 2011, 10:15 AM   #4330
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Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
How long does it normally take in China to replace a minister fired and detained for serious breaches of discipline? Can we expect prolonged confusion, or are "serious breaches of discipline" normally announced after (and because) a successor has been agreed upon?
If he is treated like the hundreds of typical Chinese politicians who are removed for violating party discipline, the following is what I believe will take place.

WHAT I TYPE HERE IS PURE SPECULATION AND SHOULD NOT BE QUOTED AND/OR USED AS ANY TYPE OF REFERENCE. I DO NOT ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBLIY FOR WHAT’S BEING SAID IN THIS POST.

He will be isolated for a moderate length of time (dare I say 1-5 months, closer to 1 than 5) while the investigation of his offical charges take place. During which time he will be cut off from all external communication and will be subjected to a unbearable amount of questioning. (this part is basically like unofficially going to a police detention while you're being tried).

When this takes place, his friends and family will have a chance to "work" his connections by expending unimaginable amounts of money and resources in an attempt to break him out of his current situation. When this happens, three possible events may take place.

1. He is found to be innocent of the charges and be released to return to his prior position. For someone of his stature and the amount of publicity this have already received, the chance of this occurring would almost be 0.

2. He is found to be guilty of the charge, but still within the grounds to potentially receive forgiveness. When this happens he will likely be fired from his current position, but he will probably remain a member of the communist party. His accountable possessions will likely be confiscated by the party to pay back for whatever amounts of “grey” money & resources that he was proven to have taken. And that will mostly be the end of this business.

3. He is guilty and unforgivable. When this happens, he will likely be fired from his current position and removed from the party ranks. With this action, he will likely be turned over to the police and the judiciary system to be tried under the civil law of China. The civil law of China, I believe, state that anyone holding his political position will be punishable by the death penalty if caught and proven to have taken bribes for amounts larger than the rough equivalent of $40,000USD. The amount of bribes that a person in his position would be taking can probably amount to hundreds of millions of dollars USD. The result of the trial will most likely result in him receiving a very long (most likely life) sentence in jail. The death penalty is also probable depending on how many people he had pissed off.
Anyone please feel free to disagree with me.

When one of these three possibilities have taken place. The occupiant of this position will be determined. But you can probably be certain that there are a trainload of candidates competing for it at this very moment.

WHAT I TYPE HERE IS PURE SPECULATION AND SHOULD NOT BE QUOTED AND/OR USED AS ANY TYPE OF REFERENCE. I DO NOT ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBLIY FOR WHAT’S BEING SAID IN THIS POST.
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Last edited by UD2; February 14th, 2011 at 10:21 AM.
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Old February 14th, 2011, 10:24 AM   #4331
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forget what I have said in the last post. Everything has already been played out. The dude's in quite a large amount of trouble.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english201...c_13729242.htm
China's railway minister under investigation over "disciplinary violation"2011-02-12 18:07:44

BEIJING, Feb. 12 (Xinhua) -- Liu Zhijun, the Chinese Minister of Railways, has become the latest senior official to be investigated in the country's battle against corruption.

Liu, who heads the country's giant railway system since 2003, is under investigation over alleged "severe violation of discipline," said a Xinhuanet report that quoted the Communist Party of China's (CPC's) discipline watchdog on Saturday.

The Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI) of the CPC did not give further details, according to Xinhuanet.

Liu, 58, has been removed from his post as the Party chief of the ministry, Xinhuanet quoted the Organization Department of the CPC Central Committee as saying.

Sheng Guangzu, 62, head of the General Administration of Customs (GAC), has reportedly been appointed to replace Liu.

About a month ago, Zhang Jingli, former deputy director of the State Food and Drug Administration, was removed from public office and expelled from the CPC for serious violations.

According to the CCDI and the Ministry of Supervision, Zhang abused his position to receive "a large amount of money" in bribes.

Other high-ranking CPC officials sacked for graft include Kang Rixin, a former head of Chinese nuclear giant China National Nuclear Corporation, and Huang Yao, former chairman of the Guizhou Provincial Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC).

A total of 146,517 officials across China were punished for disciplinary violations in 2010, according to the CCDI.

Among the officials, 5,098 were leading at the county level or above and 804 were prosecuted .

Early last month, when addressing a CCDI plenary session, President Hu Jintao stressed that corruption was still a grave concern for the country and vowed that the government would fight it with greater determination and with more force.

Hu had pledged more efforts to be made to investigate "graft in key industries and key posts."

China issued the first ever white paper on its anti-graft efforts last December, expressing its resolve to strengthen the fight against corruption.

Besides penalizing corrupt officials, the country has worked to reform the system and closed loopholes to prevent corruption.

Last December, the CPC Central Committee and the State Council amended an anti-corruption regulation, expanding the original 17 articles to 32 articles and adding more detailed punishments for corrupt officials.

Efforts were made to facilitate public supervision of officials. Discipline inspection organs of the CPC, procuratorates, and government supervisory and audit departments have established tip-off systems with hotlines and websites.

The Supreme People's Court (SPC) said Wednesday that all provincial courts on China's mainland have launched websites to collect tips against corrupt judges, following the launch of a tip-off website by SPC.
Editor: Lu Hui
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Old February 14th, 2011, 10:34 AM   #4332
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self deleted.
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Old February 14th, 2011, 12:06 PM   #4333
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UD2 View Post
Sheng Guangzu, 62, head of the General Administration of Customs (GAC), has reportedly been appointed to replace Liu.
What is the history and connections of Sheng Guangzu?

Liu Zhijun was 51 when he started, a Vice Minister with history of lower posts in Ministry of Railways.

Sheng Guangzu also is said to have held lower posts in Ministry of Railways, but he then became head of GAC.

What are the plans of Sheng for railways, and who are his associates who would accompany him to Ministry of Railways?
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Old February 14th, 2011, 09:05 PM   #4334
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I have no idea. Perhaps this firing is the opening shot in the battle between the Hu-led fourth generation and the Xi-led (and Jiang-inspired?) fifth generation.
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Old February 15th, 2011, 12:32 AM   #4335
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I have no idea. Perhaps this firing is the opening shot in the battle between the Hu-led fourth generation and the Xi-led (and Jiang-inspired?) fifth generation.
is it normal for the shots to be fired prior to the offical transition?
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Old February 17th, 2011, 12:14 AM   #4336
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Gentlemen sorry for interrupting the hot topic of Liu but I have one more question to ask.

I was previously going to take a train from Guangzhou to Wuhan and was wondering about seat availability. However I decided instead to go only as far as Chenzhou which is one of the few major stops where CRH trains stop frequently and it's just over an hour away from Guangzhou. I have to do this in order to save money and yet I should be able to see the best the trains and the line has to offer (i.e. speed above all).

The question is is it easy to get a seat from Guangzhou South to Chenzhou? Logically it should be easier than to get a seat to Wuhan or Changsha. Maybe it's even possible to get a seat for the same day or even for the next train when purchasing ticket? Or are there some kind of other priorities for seat availability?
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Old February 17th, 2011, 04:26 AM   #4337
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yes there's plenty of seats available to anywhere with CRH, as stated repeatedly it's very easy to get a train for the same day, even the next train if you are willing to pay for first class. With second class it shouldn't be more than a few hours wait, the seat availability is almost like a commuter service
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Old February 17th, 2011, 07:45 AM   #4338
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UD2 View Post
is it normal for the shots to be fired prior to the offical transition?
Hu Jintao cleaned out Shanghai (and Jiang Zemin's power base) after he had secured his position at the top.
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Old February 17th, 2011, 01:00 PM   #4339
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First chinese self-made maglev train put into commerzial service at the pudong maglev track in Shanghai

http://www.tianya.cn/publicforum/con...1/319935.shtml






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Old February 17th, 2011, 02:01 PM   #4340
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First chinese self-made maglev train put into commerzial service at the pudong maglev track in Shanghai

http://www.tianya.cn/publicforum/con...1/319935.shtml
Now that the trains are self-made, would extending the line be considered again?
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