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Old January 31st, 2012, 07:04 PM   #4641
hmmwv
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That I don't know since I have no insider knowledge of the MOR's operation, but judging from past news it's a dynamic situation, the schedule change will occur when there is a measurable drop in the number of trips.
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Old February 12th, 2012, 06:09 PM   #4642
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6.4 mln catch Chinese trains on Saturday


Passengers line for entering the Yinchuan Raiway Station in Yinchuan, capital of northwest China's Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Feb. 12, 2012. As the new term will begin soon in most universities, students and migrant workers together give rise to the last Spring Festival travel rush, which will last until Feb. 16. (Xinhua/Peng Zhaozhi)

BEIJING, Feb. 12 (Xinhua) -- More than 6.4 million people traveled by train in China on Saturday as students returning to colleges filled carriages across the country, the Ministry of Railways (MOR) said Sunday.

Stations continued to see massive numbers of passengers in the last several days of the 40-day Spring Festival travel season, which begins on Jan. 8 and ends on Feb. 16.

By Saturday, the country's railway authorities had sold 193.27 million tickets during the travel season, according to a statement posted on the MOR website.

"Railway traffic is generally in order," the MOR said.

The ministry put 711 more trains into service to cope with the increasing passenger flow on Saturday and has prepared 694 additional trains for Sunday's travel rush.

China's Spring Festival travel season, which lasts from Jan. 8 to Feb. 16 this year, witnesses the world's biggest human traffic flow every year as hundreds of millions of people, mainly migrant workers and students, travel across the nation.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 08:28 AM   #4643
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BBC News - Real name train tickets net fugitives in China

CHINA

13 February 2012 Last updated at 11:02 GMT

Real name train tickets net fugitives in China

Police in China say more than 370 fugitives have been arrested during the Chinese New Year travel rush, under a new system which requires tickets to display the buyer's real names.

Among the detainees are murder and robbery suspects, officials say.
China has made real names compulsory in services such as online microblogs, a measure some see as a move to restrict civil rights.

Railway authorities insist it is a measure to combat illegal ticket sales.
The Ministry of Railways introduced the system in January to tackle illegal ticket sales known as "ticket scalping", which reaches its height during the travel rush around Chinese New Year.

The new system requires railway passengers to buy their tickets with a valid identity card or passport. Both the ticket and identity document are examined when entering train stations or getting ticket refunds.

Among the 375 fugitives arrested so far, 107 were caught in the Guangzhou railway police district, says the Ministry of Public Security in a statement.
During the annual rush, many workers and students in cities find it hard to secure a ticket to go home and even to return to cities for school or work once the festivities are over.

The annual Chinese New Year travel rush will officially end on Thursday.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-17008789
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Old February 14th, 2012, 09:50 AM   #4644
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Why is providing a real name considered a civil rights issue? We need to do so for airplane tickets, and there are no restrictions as to who can buy a ticket, as long as the name matches in the end.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 12:48 PM   #4645
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Why is providing a real name considered a civil rights issue? We need to do so for airplane tickets, and there are no restrictions as to who can buy a ticket, as long as the name matches in the end.
I think you misread it:

"China has made real names compulsory in services such as online microblogs, a measure some see as a move to restrict civil rights."

For online microblogs some see it as a move to restrict civil rights. That bit wasn't about the train tickets.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 02:43 PM   #4646
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However the tone is confusing and implying the same civil rights issues applies to railway tickets. But since the article is from BBC I'm not entirely surprised.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 02:47 PM   #4647
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
However the tone is confusing and implying the same civil rights issues applies to railway tickets. But since the article is from BBC I'm not entirely surprised.
Yes yes, the BBC is trying to protect citizens of a foreign country from unfair persecution. How horrible!
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Old February 14th, 2012, 10:19 PM   #4648
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
Yes yes, the BBC is trying to protect citizens of a foreign country from unfair persecution. How horrible!
Come on you are just blowing things out of proportion, BBC gives rats a** about protecting anyone except demonizing China, which frankly is an easy target because it has a lot to dislike by people of the free world, so it's popular to bash China on any occasions, and it's in BBC's interest to do so. Second all I'm trying to say is that the article needlessly tried to bring politics to a regular news piece, what's up with all the sarcasm? Alright enough rant here let's go back to railway news and such.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 11:09 PM   #4649
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The British use to arrest children in Hong Kong for daring to protest against them when they ruled over the territory undemocratically. Just because you care about someone's rights doesn't mean you're a human rights champion. By that logic Hitler was a human rights champion because he cared about the rights of his fellow Aryans.
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Old February 15th, 2012, 12:01 AM   #4650
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
Come on you are just blowing things out of proportion, BBC gives rats a** about protecting anyone except demonizing China, which frankly is an easy target because it has a lot to dislike by people of the free world, so it's popular to bash China on any occasions, and it's in BBC's interest to do so. Second all I'm trying to say is that the article needlessly tried to bring politics to a regular news piece, what's up with all the sarcasm? Alright enough rant here let's go back to railway news and such.
I don't understand where this mentalitly of "EVERYONE'S DEMONISING/HATING ON CHINA, ALL THESE FOREIGN NEWS WEBSITES ARE TOTALLY UNOBJECTIVE, NEVER HAVE BEEN AND NEVER WILL BE" even comes from. I mean, just because you don't like something doesn't make it true. Also, what motivation could the BBC have to demonise China? I've just seen enough of this constant chat about how News Service X must definitely hate China because they posted some negative comments on the place.

Anyway, you're right, back on topic.
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Old February 16th, 2012, 05:52 PM   #4651
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
I don't understand where this mentalitly of "EVERYONE'S DEMONISING/HATING ON CHINA, ALL THESE FOREIGN NEWS WEBSITES ARE TOTALLY UNOBJECTIVE, NEVER HAVE BEEN AND NEVER WILL BE" even comes from. I mean, just because you don't like something doesn't make it true. Also, what motivation could the BBC have to demonise China? I've just seen enough of this constant chat about how News Service X must definitely hate China because they posted some negative comments on the place.

Anyway, you're right, back on topic.
Alright, very last OT reply, because the general public hate China, so demonizing China is popular with the public, it attracts viewers/readers, brings the company profit. And it's not just China, but I'm also frustrated at how the US is demonized around the world too, both countries are target rich environment too if you are in the demonizing business . Oh well.
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Old February 16th, 2012, 06:11 PM   #4652
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absolutely correct!
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Old February 16th, 2012, 08:02 PM   #4653
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
Alright, very last OT reply, because the general public hate China, so demonizing China is popular with the public, it attracts viewers/readers, brings the company profit. And it's not just China, but I'm also frustrated at how the US is demonized around the world too, both countries are target rich environment too if you are in the demonizing business . Oh well.
Yes, boohoo, two of the richest and most powerful countries in the world, and sometimes people don't fully agree with them! Oh no! How sad!


Come on, grow some balls that are the proper scale for countries that size and learn to take some honest criticism, in stead of crying foul play.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 03:11 AM   #4654
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Do people here read BBC?

One can search "china" at BBC webpage; result of news regarding China will be ~90% negative. I don't think all of it is just a coincidence.

I like BBC a lot. My current favorite show is a BBC program, Top Gear. I LOVE their documentaries and generally find their news objective, too. However, when it comes to China, their reporting changes.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 04:42 AM   #4655
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Well, we just need to be more critical of what we read, even those written by the Western media. Otherwise, the article does have some useful facts worth noting.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 05:28 PM   #4656
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Speaking of Top Gear, their latest trip to Beijing wasn't bad at all, I don't mind they troll on Chinese KIRF cars at all because there're good reasons to and it's funny. What they should do is a special with race of air, rail, and car travel, say from Beijing to Shanghai. And CRH will win because the plane will have a 3 hour delay at PEK and Clarkson will be stuck on Beijing 3rd ring road for the next year.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 07:01 PM   #4657
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Quote:
Real name train tickets net fugitives in China

Police in China say more than 370 fugitives have been arrested during the Chinese New Year travel rush, under a new system which requires tickets to display the buyer's real names.
I predicted this in post #3376 on the China HSR thread when I said:
Quote:
Do forumers think that the Ministry of Public Security will not be monitoring ticket sales to look for suspicious patterns? To look for wanted suspects? Of course they will, just as American security agencies monitor airline ticket sales. Real name train tickets are another method of control.
Note that the stated purpose of real-name tickets was to stop ticket scalpers, but once personal information is generated, the police and government just can't resist getting their hands on it. The information was used for an ulterior motive. I doubt it will stop at catching suspects.

Nabbing 370 suspected criminals is good. That's something on the plus side. On the negative side is the information generation about individual's personal travel habits. That information could be accessed by divorce lawyers looking for evidence of an affair, by the Ministry of Public Security , by voyeuristic employees curious about their neighbor's goings-on, etc. Liu Xiaobo is a "criminal" in China. So is anyone who publicly opposes the Communist Party's rule, publicly calls for multi-party elections, publicly calls for the arrest of CCP leaders, and so-on. Those "criminals" can also be tracked and nabbed through the use of real-name tickets.

I oppose mass collection of personal information by the government absent some overriding public interest. What are the procedures for storing and deleting the information? Who's ensuring deletion of the information? The Hong Kong Edison Chen sex scandal showed that once digital information is leaked, it's out there forever, there's no going back. Digital information can easily be copied to a single flash drive, an iPhone, hacked, emailed, whatever, then spread around the world and entered into the public record in perpetuity.

I anticipate the age-old argument that if you're got nothing to hide, why bother about increased government surveillance? This argument doesn't even hold water in a liberal democracy like Sweden, so with a authoritarian government like in China it is even less convincing. We've all got something to hide. Do you tell your colleagues and neighbors when you masturbate? How often you have sex? Every detail of your trips? What if you are a law-abiding person with a stalker? That stalker could use details of your trip to follow and harass you. A corrupt government official can use that information to track and harass you. Real-name tickets is one less bit of privacy in a world of ever-shrinking privacy. Savvy, liberty-conscious Chinese citizens should oppose them too.

Last edited by Geography; February 17th, 2012 at 07:08 PM.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 08:06 PM   #4658
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Okay guys, thanks for getting the topic back on track, but please don't derail it with political nonsense and the "Woe is China" clap-trap please. Every country has an agenda and every media outlet is, in some way biased (some more than others). This is just the way of the world. Discuss these topics in the skybar or, preferably on another forum.

Last edited by Svartmetall; February 17th, 2012 at 08:17 PM.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 08:13 PM   #4659
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China's railways see 220 mln trips during festival travel rush

BEIJING, Feb. 16 (Xinhua) -- The Ministry of Railways said Thursday that an estimated 220 million passengers traversed the country's railways during this year's 40-day Spring Festival travel rush.

Railways transported 216 billion passengers during the first 39 days of the travel rush, which lasted from Jan. 8 to Feb. 16, the ministry said in a statement on its website.

Passengers were able to purchase train tickets online or via telephone for the first time this year, allowing them to avoid long lines and ticket scalpers.

The Spring Festival holiday, which brings with it the beginning of the Chinese Lunar New Year, began on Jan. 23 this year. Hundreds of millions of Chinese, mainly migrant workers and college students, travel home during the holiday every year to reunite with their families.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 09:03 PM   #4660
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Quote:
Okay guys, thanks for getting the topic back on track, but please don't derail it with political nonsense and the "Woe is China" clap-trap please. Every country has an agenda and every media outlet is, in some way biased (some more than others).
The issue of real-name tickets is pertinent to management of the railroad network. National values usually underpin large political decisions, such as the value that lower class Chinese migrants have a right to go home during New Year, and thus the government subsidizes railroads to uphold that right. Hammering the BBC or other non-Chinese media doesn't change the fact that the MoR will soon require real-name tickets if it doesn't already. This is an issue where public policy, national values, and individual rights intersect. It is relevant to this thread.
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