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Old December 21st, 2012, 07:34 PM   #5001
Woonsocket54
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Shenzhen East Station

http://www.sznews.com/photo/content/...nt_7528650.htm

































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Old December 21st, 2012, 10:25 PM   #5002
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Great pictures. I presume that that Shenzhen to Tianjin train will take a loooong time to get to Tianjin.
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Old December 22nd, 2012, 12:09 AM   #5003
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The Silk Railroad of China-Europe Trade

Multinationals operating in China have been setting up factories deep in the interior in search of affordable labor. The drawback: These plants can be more than a thousand kilometers (621 miles) from the coast. For companies exporting to Europe—still one of the largest markets for Chinese goods—shipping by air from Chongqing or other inland cities is too expensive. Trucking or carrying goods by train to the ports of Shanghai or Shenzhen’s Yantian and then shipping them to Western Europe can take 40 days.
===
Shipping one container by train costs about $10,000, one-third the price of air transit, Prophet says. Although the train is about twice the cost of shipping by sea, it takes only 21 days for products from a factory in Chongqing to reach Western Europe by rail. The carbon footprint of rail, meanwhile, is about one-thirtieth that of air freight.


Full Article Below
http://www.businessweek.com/articles...a-europe-trade
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Old December 22nd, 2012, 12:37 AM   #5004
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Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post


Great pictures. I presume that that Shenzhen to Tianjin train will take a loooong time to get to Tianjin.
1 day 7 hours 16 minutes. Leaves Buji in the morning, spends two days and the night between on move, arrives next afternoon 16:06.

I observe that while Transmanchurian and Transmongolian both carry passenger trains between Beijing and Moscow, there seem to be no trains via Alashankow. What is to be done about that?
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Old December 22nd, 2012, 06:24 PM   #5005
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22 Dec, 2012, 04.46PM IST, PTI

China opens $962 million border railway with Kazakhstan

BEIJING: The rail line comprised of 292-km section in China and the remaining 293-km section in Kazakhstan. They were joined at the Korgas Pass in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region.

Construction of the Chinese side of the railway cost $962 million, railway officials said.

The rail line is expected to ease the burden of the Alataw trade pass, where the first China-Central Asia railway traverses. It handles 15.6 million tonnes of train-laden cargo a year.

... ...
source
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Old December 22nd, 2012, 06:27 PM   #5006
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--weibo.com
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Old December 22nd, 2012, 07:24 PM   #5007
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What is the current train trip time Urumqi-Yining-Khorgos-Altynkol-Zhetigen-Almaty?

And how many trains daily are scheduled to serve the route?
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Old December 23rd, 2012, 07:08 AM   #5008
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An ok reading.

Quote:
China's state-planned railway age outdoes Britain and America's
Our 19th-century economies benefited hugely from railway investment – but China's planned approach is more efficient

David Turner
guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 19 December 2012 12.59 EST
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In 1825, William George Allen, council to Britain's first inter-city railway, the Liverpool and Manchester, predicted that railways might "prove of the greatest advantage to our trade and commerce; and which, if we do not adopt it, will be adopted by our rivals." He was not wrong, and in the 19th century the spread of railways across Britain and America contributed to both nations' transformation into industrial world powers. Indeed, recent estimates have suggested that without the quicker and cheaper travel provided by the railways, British GDP would have been 14% lower in 1912.

The current thinking of the Chinese government is strikingly similar to Allen's. Over the past 20 years it has invested heavily in the railways to enable them to be a supporter and facilitator of economic development. However, in the last six, investment levels have reached new highs. An investment programme worth about £80bn has grown the country's network from 78,000km at the end of 2007 to an estimated 110,000km at the end of this year. This was supplemented by the announcement in 2008 of a further £74bn to enable the network cope with increased traffic until 2020.

This investment has generally considered to have served its purpose. Similar to most railway development, some expenditure has been on prestige projects, such as the world's longest high-speed line between Beijing to Guangzhou, which is due to open on 26 December. However, the Chinese network's primary role has not been to ferry business people, but to enable the easy movement of goods and labour. Indeed, passenger numbers increased by 4.6% in November, and while in 2011 China's railway network only constituted 6% of worldwide route mileage, it carried 25% of its workload. Therefore, further investment in railways will very likely continue to facilitate China's economic development; just like in Victorian Britain and America.

There is, however, a good possibility that China's railway will be built to do this more efficiently than those in 19th-century Britain and America. In these countries the planning of routes was almost completely left to the private companies, with very little state interference. Consequently, by 1880 Britain could claim to have a largely comprehensive network; but because of competition and speculative building it was considerably over-capitalised and possessed excessive route mileage. Indeed, Mark Casson has estimated that if the state had planned Britain's railways, by 1914 they would still have been able to comprehensively serve the nation's needs for 25% less cost and with a route mileage 7,000 miles shorter than the real total of 20,000 miles.

Yet, because the Chinese government determines when and where a line is constructed, it is likely to avoid such problems. Its railway planners are not encumbered by competitive line building, speculative bubbles, struggles over territory or unrealistic expectations of profit; factors that shaped Britain and America's haphazard railway network. Rather, it can theoretically link two cities, ports or factories when required, providing quickly and cost-effectively a network that is shaped to the needs of the economy, rather than private interests.

But furthermore, the high engineering standards of modern railways, combined with the nation's mixed terrain and vast distances between cities, mean that only the government has the resources to speedily and adequately augment China's railway network to support the nation's quickly growing economy. While total investment in Britain's railways between 1825 and 1910 would be worth approximately £110bn today; this is far less than the sums expected to be invested in Chinese railways in only 12 years between 2008 and 2020. Thus, had the Chinese government not chosen to invest staggering amounts in its railways, this may have considerably held back the nation's economic progress.

Therefore, state planning and investment may mean that by 2020 China will possess a railway system that contributes more to growing and supporting its economy than those Britain and America developed in the 19th century.
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Old December 24th, 2012, 01:37 PM   #5009
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Originally Posted by foxmulder View Post
Yet, because the Chinese government determines when and where a line is constructed, it is likely to avoid such problems. Its railway planners are not encumbered by competitive line building, speculative bubbles, struggles over territory or unrealistic expectations of profit; factors that shaped Britain and America's haphazard railway network. Rather, it can theoretically link two cities, ports or factories when required, providing quickly and cost-effectively a network that is shaped to the needs of the economy, rather than private interests.
Governments make mistakes, also. It is by no means certain that China will avoid said issues.
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Old December 24th, 2012, 01:44 PM   #5010
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13 hours to 3 hours!!! Damn! These new high speed railways are making travel so much simpler throughout the country. 350km/h line would be better but 200km/h is still pretty fast for overland travel.
They are, indeed.

Travel times by nnnn trains are 76 kph on average and once you get off the train you are going 40kph average, with stops and such, on local intercity buses, 90kph avg on long haul buses between major cities on freeways and tollways.

It can take me 17 hours to get on the CRH to Wuhan from nearby by bus, and then 4.5 hours to Shenzhen from Wuhan.

The ZGT are changing the face of Chinese travel for the better.

Prices are often MORE than discount air fare, but the best part is that one can normally buy a ticket short notice on a CRH during peak seasons and get about quickly. Planes are sold out, buses and normal trains sold out days or on week in advance and just a bad time.

1st Class CRH? No issues.
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Old December 26th, 2012, 07:50 AM   #5011
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The building under construction next to Shanghai Tower is Oriental Financial Center. The "plot" next to Jinmao is reserved green belt and no skyscraper will be built there.

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Old December 26th, 2012, 08:02 AM   #5012
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Dec 21 night at Tongzhou section of the Beijing-Harbin railway, Moron #1 driving close to the railway tracks got stuck in a ditch and called for help, Moron #2 showed up and rammed two trees, broke the railway fencing and got onto the track. CRH train D8 from Shenyang to Beijing was passing by and had to emergency break but still hit the Audi SUV. No one on the train was injured and the two morons were also okay. The CRH train broke its nose windshield and costed the 200 passengers a few hours of their time.

http://news.qq.com/a/20121222/000877...urce=weibolife

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The building under construction next to Shanghai Tower is Oriental Financial Center. The "plot" next to Jinmao is reserved green belt and no skyscraper will be built there.

Last edited by hmmwv; December 26th, 2012 at 08:34 AM.
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Old December 26th, 2012, 08:14 AM   #5013
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a Chinese version of Dumb & Dumber lol
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Old December 26th, 2012, 10:21 AM   #5014
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Why would they do that? Are they retarded? Audi SUV doesn't sound like something a complete retard would own.
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Old December 26th, 2012, 12:08 PM   #5015
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Why would they do that? Are they retarded? Audi SUV doesn't sound like something a complete retard would own.
An SUV is EXACTLY what a complete retard would own.
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Old December 26th, 2012, 01:10 PM   #5016
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A rich one, it should be added. BMW's are popular in my country with young men who have more money than intelect...
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Old December 26th, 2012, 03:02 PM   #5017
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An SUV is EXACTLY what a complete retard would own.
Well I mean if one was a complete retard he could not AFFORD an Audi SUV because I believe we're talking of a 500 000RMB+ car (a new one that is).
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Old December 26th, 2012, 10:16 PM   #5018
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Well I mean if one was a complete retard he could not AFFORD an Audi SUV because I believe we're talking of a 500 000RMB+ car (a new one that is).
To come from money does not require any brains.
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Old December 26th, 2012, 11:54 PM   #5019
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Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
To come from money does not require any brains.
nor does commenting on here.... obviously.

I'm going to assume that driver number 2 swerved to avoid driver number 1 and ended up crashing as a result
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Old December 27th, 2012, 01:32 AM   #5020
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Audi SUV doesn't sound like something a complete retard would own.
You haven't been to China, have you?
Audi drivers goes for the worst kind over there.
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