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Old March 15th, 2013, 08:10 AM   #5241
maldini
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Assets value should be more, imho. Registered capital is different that assets value. Only train sets it has can be more than Also it depends how they define the as "assets". Do trains stations count? Apparently, this corporation will be responsible for the building of infrastructure too so that alone is a huge business.
The train station should count as asset. This also includes the large plazas surrounding the new big stations. These plazas can probably be sold for real estate development in the future.
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Old March 16th, 2013, 11:19 AM   #5242
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We are usually discussing new projects here, but I was wondering what is the overall density of China's passenger railway system. Any idea what is the percentage of sizeable towns (50,000+ inhabitants) without a regular service? How does it compare to the railway density in Japan or Western Europe?

I'm not as well informed about Japan, but in Germany, for example, there is only one such place and none at all in UK.
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Old March 16th, 2013, 11:49 AM   #5243
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The train station should count as asset. This also includes the large plazas surrounding the new big stations. These plazas can probably be sold for real estate development in the future.
Is that the actual plan?

I thought they were more "spill over" areas for dispersing the crowds during Golden Week etc. The stations are massive, and therefore the pedestrian/car approaches need to be massive to handle peak crowds.
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Old March 16th, 2013, 06:18 PM   #5244
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no, there is no such plans.
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Old March 16th, 2013, 07:09 PM   #5245
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This map of China is interesting for how it shows China's territory. It must be an ROC map because the PRC gave up its claim on Mongolia in 1945 to appease the USSR, while the ROC still officially claims Mongolia. It also shows large swathes of Tajikistan, India, and Myanmar as part of China. This map shows China at its greatest territorial extent since the Yuan Dynasty.
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Old March 16th, 2013, 08:13 PM   #5246
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Well, Qing China actually stretched much further than present-day China's boundaries. Technically, the Yuan Dynasty was confined to a smaller area around China, and does not include other Mongol territories further west that went all the way to Europe.
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Old March 17th, 2013, 11:24 PM   #5247
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Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
We are usually discussing new projects here, but I was wondering what is the overall density of China's passenger railway system. Any idea what is the percentage of sizeable towns (50,000+ inhabitants) without a regular service? How does it compare to the railway density in Japan or Western Europe?

I'm not as well informed about Japan, but in Germany, for example, there is only one such place and none at all in UK.
There still cities with 250k+ with no rail service. However, with with the recent buildout the number is fewer and fewer. Current the most glaring one is Macau. (With Zhuhai recently getting rail, and Macau think of rapid transit. that issue might be addressed)

Zhoushan (500k+ urban on central island, 1M+ metro) I believe the largest city without a rail connection. However, with no railway slot on the Jintang Bridge connect it to Ningbo, I doubt a rail link is possible soon.
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Old March 18th, 2013, 01:08 AM   #5248
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Originally Posted by luhai View Post
There still cities with 250k+ with no rail service. However, with with the recent buildout the number is fewer and fewer. Current the most glaring one is Macau. (With Zhuhai recently getting rail, and Macau think of rapid transit. that issue might be addressed)

Zhoushan (500k+ urban on central island, 1M+ metro) I believe the largest city without a rail connection. However, with no railway slot on the Jintang Bridge connect it to Ningbo, I doubt a rail link is possible soon.
I think it's only fair to give a break to a city located on islands. I was more wondering about the network in the west, north-west and south-west of the country far from the densely populated coastal regions. I guess the towns tend to be much smaller there, though.
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Old March 18th, 2013, 06:36 AM   #5249
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luhai View Post
There still cities with 250k+ with no rail service. However, with with the recent buildout the number is fewer and fewer. Current the most glaring one is Macau. (With Zhuhai recently getting rail, and Macau think of rapid transit. that issue might be addressed)

Zhoushan (500k+ urban on central island, 1M+ metro) I believe the largest city without a rail connection. However, with no railway slot on the Jintang Bridge connect it to Ningbo, I doubt a rail link is possible soon.
Binzhou with its 2.8 million people is probably the largest major city in China without passenger rail service. But Dezhou-Dajiawa Railway should open next year and it'll be connected.
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Old March 19th, 2013, 12:44 AM   #5250
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Is that the actual plan?

I thought they were more "spill over" areas for dispersing the crowds during Golden Week etc. The stations are massive, and therefore the pedestrian/car approaches need to be massive to handle peak crowds.
Could stations be extended over the existing squares? The pillars to carry the second story, and the scattering of stairs and lifts to reach the second story, would leave most of the existing ground level square still free for crowds.

Then again, building on pillars costs more than building on ground.
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Old March 19th, 2013, 09:53 AM   #5251
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Could stations be extended over the existing squares? The pillars to carry the second story, and the scattering of stairs and lifts to reach the second story, would leave most of the existing ground level square still free for crowds.

Then again, building on pillars costs more than building on ground.
What have been done before was build lofts functioning as additional waiting/lounge area inside the waiting hall which already has huge clearance. The construction can take place during off seasons so for stations such as Shanghai Hongqiao and Nanjing South the effective waiting area can be doubled, but the issue would be direct access to the platform.
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Old March 23rd, 2013, 11:16 AM   #5252
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Yang Chuantang

Now that railways are subject to Transport Ministry, who is the Minister?

Yang Chuantang is not a new minister. He has been the Transport Minister in Wen Jiabao´s State Council since August 2012, and was kept by Li Keqiang.

But who is that Yang? What is his background? What are his skills, interests and connections?

What are Yang´s plans for railways? And who are the new heads of China Railway Corporation and State Administration, respectively?
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Old March 23rd, 2013, 01:52 PM   #5253
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(...)
What are Yang´s plans for railways? And who are the new heads of China Railway Corporation and State Administration, respectively?
We will cover that soon, so DON'T MISS THE NEXT INSTALLMENT of this series!!
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Old March 24th, 2013, 01:10 AM   #5254
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Originally Posted by Geography View Post
This map of China is interesting for how it shows China's territory. It must be an ROC map because the PRC gave up its claim on Mongolia in 1945 to appease the USSR, while the ROC still officially claims Mongolia. It also shows large swathes of Tajikistan, India, and Myanmar as part of China. This map shows China at its greatest territorial extent since the Yuan Dynasty.
Just for the record. It was ROC (under Mr. Jiang) that recognized Mongolia independence in 1946 three years before PRC (under Mr. Mao) took power in the mainland. Of course Mao also recognized but that was around 1950
and at the same time Jiang renegaded. However he already lost the mainland by that time so this was an empty gesture.
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Old March 24th, 2013, 08:34 AM   #5255
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Just for the record. It was ROC (under Mr. Jiang) that recognized Mongolia independence in 1946 three years before PRC (under Mr. Mao) took power in the mainland. Of course Mao also recognized but that was around 1950
and at the same time Jiang renegaded. However he already lost the mainland by that time so this was an empty gesture.
Laojang

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In fact the US actually supported the ROC's claim on Mongolia at the UN. It was only when the Soviets threatened to veto the entry of newly independent African nations into the UN, did the ROC stop vetoing Mongolia's entry into the UN.
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Old April 7th, 2013, 01:10 PM   #5256
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Railway interchange in Yichang, Hubei Province



by Liu Shusong
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Old April 7th, 2013, 05:22 PM   #5257
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oh god so epic
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Old April 8th, 2013, 12:25 AM   #5258
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Railway interchange in Yichang, Hubei Province



by Liu Shusong
All diesel lines, or all under construction?
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Old April 9th, 2013, 04:54 AM   #5259
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Railway in Qinghai Province



by 中华火车迷部落
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Old April 9th, 2013, 07:57 AM   #5260
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I see that many people 'liked' the photo showing the interchange in Yichang, which was even commented as 'epic'.

Why do you guys like it? Is it of grand scale?
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