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Old May 9th, 2013, 11:02 AM   #5281
big-dog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
Do you have any additional technical data about it?
Unortunately I don't have the tech data about this tunnel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Including Longhua-Futian-Kowloon West high speed railway, all of which lies in Pearl River Delta and is completed by 2016 (partly paid in Hong Kong dollars), and a part of Longhua-Xiamen high speed railway which lies in Pearl River Delta,and is completed by October 2013?

Including a large part of Shanghai-Beijing high speed railway lying in Jiangsu and invested in 2010 and first half of 2011, and most of Shanghai-Nanjing high speed railway, invested in first half of 2010?
The answer is yes to both questions.
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Old May 9th, 2013, 11:53 AM   #5282
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
So this will be the 4th longest railway tunnel in the world (not counting subways) after it opens in 5th longest few years later when Gotthard base tunnel become operational.

Do you have any additional technical data about it? What is the greatest overburden? Is there an emergency station in the middle like in Gotthard? Maintenance tube?
The tunnel lies at around 3300 m, and mountains around here are around 4200 m high according to Google Maps, so the overburden should be around 1000 m.

Apparently there is no maintenance tube and it is being built from the two portals without intermediate access (there wouldn't be any road to reach them anyway). If there is an emergency station it could only be an enlarged section in each tube linked one to the other, but without external access, like the emergency station of the Koralm tunnel under construction in Austria (around 32.8 km in length, maximum overburden 1200 m, but at a much lower altitude than the new Guanjiao tunnel: only around 500 m).
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Old May 9th, 2013, 12:33 PM   #5283
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
The tunnel lies at around 3300 m, and mountains around here are around 4200 m high according to Google Maps, so the overburden should be around 1000 m.

Apparently there is no maintenance tube and it is being built from the two portals without intermediate access (there wouldn't be any road to reach them anyway). If there is an emergency station it could only be an enlarged section in each tube linked one to the other, but without external access, like the emergency station of the Koralm tunnel under construction in Austria (around 32.8 km in length, maximum overburden 1200 m, but at a much lower altitude than the new Guanjiao tunnel: only around 500 m).
Thanks. Some of their tunnels are very long, but not much information about them available in languages I understand. This one is particularly interesting because of very high altitude.
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Old May 11th, 2013, 03:54 PM   #5284
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Shenyang North - Taiyuan Z194



by @anytrain
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Old May 11th, 2013, 06:51 PM   #5285
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Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
Shenyang North - Taiyuan Z194
This seems to be the only Z train from Shenyang. Whereas Taiyuan is served by three Z trains.

What are the differences between Z and T trains on same route?
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Old May 11th, 2013, 11:53 PM   #5286
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better stock, faster running speed, more expensive tickets
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Old May 12th, 2013, 12:44 AM   #5287
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what really struct me in those pictures is the urbanization...

sorry for ot
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Old May 25th, 2013, 06:59 AM   #5288
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Order/investments...

Quote:
Chinese rail industry to see more orders
English.news.cn 2013-05-24 13:25:36
BEIJING, May 24 (Xinhua) -- Booming demand for urban rail transit from an increasing number of Chinese cities would reignite the railway equipment industry, the China Securities Journal reported Friday.

The National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) on Thursday revealed an urban transit plan for Kunming, capital of southwest China's Yunnan Province, that features a total investment of 63.49 billion yuan (10.34 billion U.S. dollars).

The NDRC, China's top economic planner, has approved urban transit construction plans for several cities, including Guiyang and Chongqing, for 2013.

Official statistics indicate that total urban transit investment has reached 1.23 trillion yuan thus far, of which 189.6 billion yuan was used to build 337 km of subway lines in 2012. Another 220 billion yuan will be used to build 290 km of subway lines in 2013.

The increased input has accelerated the expansion of the rail equipment industry.

China CSR and China CNR, China's two biggest train manufacturers, have boosted their business with the help of the increased investment. China CSR is filling orders for urban transit vehicles in the cities of Shenzhen, Shanghai and Chengdu, while China CNR has signed agreements concerning train manufacturing or cooperation in public transit with several cities.

The increasing development of intercity railways will also benefit the rail equipment industry. The Pearl River Delta, one of China's most developed areas, will spend 118 billion yuan on intercity railways from 2012 to 2020. China CSR and China CNR have produced new trains that specifically cater to intercity railway networks.

The intercity railway market is hoped to boost the slumping profits of the two companies, which have seen their income drop due to the country's suspension of bidding for bullet trains in 2010.

China CSR saw its year-on-year net profits fall in the first quarter of 2013, with income from bullet train sales slumping 50 percent from a year earlier to 3 billion yuan, according to a report from UBS Securities.

China CNR's quarterly report also showed weak performance, as its total sales amounted to 18.15 billion yuan, down 1.35 percent year on year.

However, the gloomy trend is likely to be reversed in 2013 due to the looming resumption of bullet train bidding, the journal reported.

The China Railway Corporation (CRC), newly formed in March 2013 after the breakup of the Ministry of Railways, has finished preparing for restarting the bidding, which is expected to begin in May or June.
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Old May 30th, 2013, 02:04 PM   #5289
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Fuzhou West

Fuzhou is to open a new station:
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/m/fuzho...t_16539747.htm
Which railways serve that station? Slow or fast?
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Old June 18th, 2013, 12:39 AM   #5290
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I've just noticed the picture at #5041, and have some more explanation. The train shown on the line under the bridge is at 3400 metres altitude (11,150 ft asl). The line was designed in the 1950s for steam engines and maintains a gradient of ~1%. The valley runs down from right of photo to left. From the summit tunnel to valley mouth is 16 kilometres in a straight line, but there are 32 kilometres of rail track twisted down the valley to descend 350 metres altitude.

If you imagine the train shown in that photo to be turned around and going up, in about two cars length it will start turning to the right 275 degrees at 300 metres radius. There is 160 metres of straight line, then the overbridge continues the curve another 142 degrees, another 135 metres straight then 50 degrees, straightening out on the second highway overbridge after a total 465 degrees of turn.

Center right of the photo you can see the station building at Erlang. After this the line goes out of picture to the right thru a 200 degree horseshoe loop to the left, coming back into picture. In the center of the photo you can see embankments and a bridge as the line turns 270 degrees to the right going thru four small tunnels. On the ridge above the last tunnel, vertically above the station building in the photo, I had my camera for this youtube clip. My companion was not willing to climb the ridge from where Luo chunxiao took his magnificent photo.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 09:25 AM   #5291
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Vactrain development

A little off-topic. The English wiki says that a 1000kph train can be put into operation in 10 years (that is 2020). And currently being researched in Southwest Jiaotong University.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vactrain

Is there any university near HK/SZ or GZ that offers masters degree focusing on these development?

I been looking everywhere in HK none. So i end up in enrolling into a financial engineering instead in HK. I am not yet officially enrolled but already admitted.

I really would like to return to core engineering research and dev. I am an electronics engineer by profession and systems/software engineer by work.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 03:19 PM   #5292
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meir David View Post
Hai friends

I feel very curious to travel in this train!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

You mean riding in the 1000kph train? If yes, then god speed. :-) maybe ride after 1 year trial service. hundred of things can go wrong at this speed.. This really needs lot of brainpower to develop this kind of technology to ensure safety.
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Old June 19th, 2013, 04:25 AM   #5293
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Fuzhou is to open a new station:
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/m/fuzho...t_16539747.htm
Which railways serve that station? Slow or fast?
Just for now it'll be mostly slow, the Xiamen Fuzhou CHR might come right thru town bypassing the old Fuzhou Central.
There is work visible on two new HSR lines,
Fuzhou Nanping Shangrao Huangshan and
Fuzhou Sanming Nanchang
but when trains start running on them is a mystery of the orient.
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Old June 20th, 2013, 08:47 PM   #5294
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silent_dragon View Post
A little off-topic. The English wiki says that a 1000kph train can be put into operation in 10 years (that is 2020). And currently being researched in Southwest Jiaotong University.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vactrain

Is there any university near HK/SZ or GZ that offers masters degree focusing on these development?

I been looking everywhere in HK none. So i end up in enrolling into a financial engineering instead in HK. I am not yet officially enrolled but already admitted.

I really would like to return to core engineering research and dev. I am an electronics engineer by profession and systems/software engineer by work.
Hey, I can recall two national key universities located in Guangzhou:
1. 中山大学 Zhongshan University; Sun Yat-sen University
2. 华南理工大学 South China University of Technology

South China U of Technology has the following schools that might fit you: School of Electronic and Information Engineering, School of mechanical and automotive engineering, School of computer science.

Sun Yat-sen U has the school of information science and technology.

I don't know if they offer research programs in high-speed rail. Hope it helps.
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Old June 21st, 2013, 03:15 AM   #5295
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Work on Guangzhou Metro Line 6 destroys five ancient tombs

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Work on Guangzhou Metro Line 6 destroys five ancient tombs
Monday, 17 June, 2013, 5:51am

Guangzhou Metro is facing a public outcry after contractors destroyed a group of ancient imperial tombs in the Menggang district during construction of Line 6 of its subway system.

The tombs, ranging from 2,200 to more than 3,000 years old and still being studied by archaeologists, were wrecked by excavators on Friday night.

The protected site, on the eastern slope of Da Gong mountain, had been sealed off by the Guangzhou Archaeology Research Centre, with warning signs posted and red lines marking the protected area.

It was fine when archaeologists left on Friday but had been torn up by the time they returned on Saturday.

"Yesterday we were still conducting archaeological excavations, but all five tombs were gone this morning," said an archaeologist quoted by Southern Metropolis Daily yesterday.

One of the archaeology technicians responsible for the site, Miao Hui , said: "At least five of them were destroyed … this time. They date from the late Shang dynasty to the Warring States. This is not the first time the construction company has destroyed ancient tombs. The area they dug up was sealed by red lines. They even specifically moved our archaeological tools aside before blazing in."

A foreman hired by the centre said the site was impossible to miss. "We have begun working with one of the tombs and used plastic film to cover the unfinished site. It's a very large and obvious target, it's impossible that the workers could miss it."

Yesterday's reports in most Guangzhou media put the number of tombs at five, while Xinhua reported on Saturday that six tombs were destroyed.

A manager for Guangzhou Metro's construction agent said the workers were confused by unclear warning signs and markings left by the archaeologists.

A Guangzhou Metro spokesman said the construction work had already been approved by the archaeology centre, according to Southern Metropolis Daily.

However, it was reported that the centre wrote to the company last month to say the site had not been cleared for construction.

The research centre's director, Zhang Qianglu , said the slope's densely packed tombs had significant historical value.

The subway project is reported to have destroyed more than a dozen ancient tombs in the first five months of the year.

The damage has triggered an outcry online, with internet users describing it as outrageous and shameless. One said she did not believe it was simply a mistake. "The constructor has never taken the historical relics seriously. If you are not sure where to dig, why don't you ask? They must be severely punished, otherwise we'll only see more cultural relics being destroyed."

This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as Guangzhou subway work destroys five ancient tombs

Warning: might be behind a paywall: http://bit.ly/19lUf3q
Maybe not directly related to railway, but there seem to be an increasing number of articles on how developers destroy historic sites.
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Old June 21st, 2013, 09:51 AM   #5296
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdolniak View Post
Work on Guangzhou Metro Line 6 destroys five ancient tombs
Bad fengshui. Watch for mysterious things happening to travellers on this line ...
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Old June 21st, 2013, 10:17 AM   #5297
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xinxingren View Post
Bad fengshui. Watch for mysterious things happening to travellers on this line ...

Yeah probably the ancient souls may ride for free in the trains..

Cant blame the workers. Blame the managers
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Old June 21st, 2013, 10:39 AM   #5298
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xinxingren View Post
Bad fengshui. Watch for mysterious things happening to travellers on this line ...
Like what Shanghai did to the elevated road pillar, they need to build something to calm those souls.....
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 11:44 AM   #5299
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
1.25 news on Beijing Station and Beijing West underground connection line



The 9.15km double line tunnel will be completed by July this year, the whole connection line will open in 2014 when millions of passengers don't have to suffer the transition difficulties between the two stations.

This project is way behind schedule. This is one of the most difficult digging projects of Beijing due to delay of land acquisition and hard geological conditions.

link

Is this a direct line between these two rail stations? not the current u/c line 7?
So no stations in between?
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Old June 22nd, 2013, 04:52 PM   #5300
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Seems it actually is the legendary railway tunnel, not a metro tunnel.


I wasn't even aware they had already started construction :P
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