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Old July 27th, 2013, 05:48 PM   #5341
stoneybee
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Originally Posted by xinxingren View Post
800 km of line from Xining to Ge'ermu has had double track, electric, and upgrade to 160km/hr since the opening of the Ge'ermu to Lhasa section in 2006. This required some small and some larger straightening and new tunnels. Remaining work on this section is the 32.6km Guanjiao tunnel. There is significant mineral traffic from this region eastwards to central China.

My guess as to why Ge'ermu - Lhasa is not in a hurry for double track electric is, traffic density too low, and the train would be the only substantial user of electricity, needing new HV transmission lines thru a desolate alpine region.
Agreed. I would even venture to guess that we will likely see the construction of a second Tibet route from either Sichuen or Yunnan into Lhasa before we ever see the double tracking of the existing line.
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Old July 27th, 2013, 05:55 PM   #5342
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How is the demand/capacity ratio on the Qinghai to Lhasa route? Is there actually a demand for a second track? Railways don't need be double track unless there is an actual demand for it. Overtaking loops are enough in such cases. The population of Tibet region is tiny. What about freight traffic? Maybe once the line to Nepal is open there will be a need to increase capacity?
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Old July 28th, 2013, 05:51 AM   #5343
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Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
July 26 10AM The tunnel is dug thru, finally, after 8 years construction

it's a 9151m, double-line tunnel connecting Beijing Railway Station and Beijing West.



by Beijing Railway
It looks like the tunnel ring blocks were not alternately positioned. Normally tunnel ring blocks were placed alternately not in line with each other to increase structural integrity. Well lets hope the ring blocks are interlocking.. like the TBM tunnel rings. Because by the looks of it, the tunnel ring blocks were manually positioned.
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Old July 29th, 2013, 10:34 AM   #5344
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It looks to me that its in-situ rather than precast concrete segments.

So in this case, those lines show the formwork, not segments as you say.

Also, it looks like that a TBM was not used here.
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Old July 29th, 2013, 11:00 AM   #5345
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the blue characters on the left say "tunnel boring machine construction" so I guess the boring machine is located behind the people in the picture.
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Old July 29th, 2013, 10:15 PM   #5346
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silent_dragon View Post
It looks like the tunnel ring blocks were not alternately positioned. Normally tunnel ring blocks were placed alternately not in line with each other to increase structural integrity. Well lets hope the ring blocks are interlocking.. like the TBM tunnel rings. Because by the looks of it, the tunnel ring blocks were manually positioned.
The picture is taken at the station end, the TBM is behind the people so not very visible. The tunnel itself has interlocking rings as you can see in following construction pictures:











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Old July 31st, 2013, 05:20 AM   #5347
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China's rail freight volume down 2.8 pct

BEIJING, July 18 (Xinhua) -- The volume of freight carried on China's railways declined 2.8 percent year on year during the January-June period as economic activities slowed, official data showed on Thursday.

Chinese railroads transported 1.94 billion tonnes of cargo in the first half of the year, down 55.07 million tonnes from the volume seen in the same period last year, according to statistics from China Railway Corporation.

The drop came as China's economic growth slid to 7.6 percent during the January-June period, the weakest first-half performance in three years.

The China Railway Corporation last month announced its plan to revamp its freight transport business, including simplifying rules and tailoring transportation to customers' needs, in a bid to better tap the logistics market.
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Old August 2nd, 2013, 05:11 AM   #5348
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This reminds me I heard that there are electrified railroads capable of handling double stacks in China. If so do you know which lines? Is there any pictures or videos on it?
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Old August 2nd, 2013, 05:08 PM   #5349
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I don't think they can handle the standard double stack, it has to be slightly lower containers.
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Old August 2nd, 2013, 11:26 PM   #5350
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There are a number of stories about having to either use lower height containers for Chinese internal traffic, or raise the wires. It looks like neither has happened. This China Daily story seems to have got lost in translation, or I don't understand how containers are measured. You can see on Youtube plenty of clips of standard flat wagons hauling 48 or 50 ISO 40 foot containers under the 25kv wires, plus this one of low stack wagons being used single loaded. There's an unanswered comment on that page asking for pix of double stacking ...
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Old August 3rd, 2013, 05:05 PM   #5351
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I don't think they can handle the standard double stack, it has to be slightly lower containers.
First of all, I am no expert here, so I could be dead wrong here.

IMO, I dont see any reason why the standard electrified railway cannot handle double decking of standard container with a low profile carriage. They should not need to either raise the electrical wire or create a new container standard. In fact, this is already done in a lot of places in the world.

The key is low profile carraige beds which China did not have in the past and is only slowly adopting. The standard configuration is usually two 20 foot container in the sunken bay and then you can stack a 40 foot even an 48 foot container on top.

Looking at the youtube video, I think there is enough clearance for that.
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Old August 5th, 2013, 01:29 AM   #5352
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Originally Posted by saiho View Post
This reminds me I heard that there are electrified railroads capable of handling double stacks in China. If so do you know which lines? Is there any pictures or videos on it?
I've found a picture in an obvious place, dunno where the train was tho'.
12306.cn has on the right hand side, just below the splash banner, a little panel rotating thru pics of goods trains.
One of those frames clearly shows a HXn loco pulling double stacked low wagons out on the open line.
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Old August 5th, 2013, 05:49 PM   #5353
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoneybee View Post
First of all, I am no expert here, so I could be dead wrong here.

IMO, I dont see any reason why the standard electrified railway cannot handle double decking of standard container with a low profile carriage. They should not need to either raise the electrical wire or create a new container standard. In fact, this is already done in a lot of places in the world.

The key is low profile carraige beds which China did not have in the past and is only slowly adopting. The standard configuration is usually two 20 foot container in the sunken bay and then you can stack a 40 foot even an 48 foot container on top.

Looking at the youtube video, I think there is enough clearance for that.
I'm fairly certain the Chinese rail containers that get double stacks are lower than the standard TEU. The Chinese system allows a maximum of two 2.4m containers or one 2.6m + one 2.4m containers to be double stacked, while in America they can double stack two 2.9m units. Standard TEUs are 2.6m and 2.9m. They do use low profile carriages but I don't think the clearance is enough, probably has something to do with catenary inside tunnels?
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Old August 6th, 2013, 03:57 PM   #5354
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That have something to do with standard Chinese loading gauge, according to that everything is build.
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Old August 6th, 2013, 08:43 PM   #5355
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Of course, that's what set the catenary heights and such.
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Old August 7th, 2013, 06:27 AM   #5356
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Railway photography, August 2013



by 扈军
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Old August 21st, 2013, 07:13 AM   #5357
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Some photos from a departing Z Sleeper Train at Fuzhou Railway Station.
Train Z57/60 leaves each day at 16:51 for Beijing. It travels via Yingtan, Huangshan, Nanjing.

Fuzhou is the Capital of Fujian Province in the Southeast of China, close by Taiwan.





Fuzhou Railway Station is the station where most classical sleeper trains originate. Coastal High-Speed trains Hangzhou-Ningbo-Wenzhou-Fuzhou Xiamen do not stop here.
Fuzhou South Railway Station is rather far away. Public bus takes 70 minutes.





The old station is a big construction site due to modernization:






The platforms:











Train Z57/60 Fuzhou - Beijing is ready to depart:













Z57/60 takes 19 hours and 47 minutes to cover nearly 2067 kilometers. It goes via Yingtan, Huangshan, Nanjing and Jinan.

Here is the complete video of the departure scene:

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:44 PM   #5358
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Lanzhou Railway Station, Gansu Province

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:45 PM   #5359
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Soft Sleeper in Train T116 Shanghai - Xian - Lanzhou

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:47 PM   #5360
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Hard Sleeper in Train T116 Shanghai - Xian - Lanzhou

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