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Old August 23rd, 2013, 11:18 AM   #5381
big-dog
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it depends. For train trips lasting more than 5 hours I would pay for a sleeper if there's a choice.
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 01:07 PM   #5382
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Quote:
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it depends. For train trips lasting more than 5 hours I would pay for a sleeper if there's a choice.
Even in daytime?

Looking at Beijing-Guangzhou:
It is less than 8 hours by G train. Second class seat on G train costs 862 yuan, first class seat 1380 yuan, business class seat 2724 yuan. By my estimate, one business seat on G train is 316 % the price of second class seat.
The fastest T train, T201, takes 20:53. For some reason, no D trains Beijing-Guangzhou. The prices are hard seat 251 yuan, hard sleepers upper 426 yuan, middle 441 yuan, lower 456 yuan, soft sleepers upper 750 yuan, lower 784 yuan, luxury soft sleepers upper 1383 yuan, lower 1445 yuan.

Upper soft sleeper looks like 299 % hard seat price, lower soft sleeper 312 % hard seat price. So if a car with soft sleepers were added to a G train, the price difference between lower soft sleeper and business class should be lower soft sleeper about 34 yuan cheaper, at say 2690 yuan.

See that upper hard sleepers are just 170 % the hard seat price. Lower hard sleepers are more expensive at 182 %. So, an upper hard sleeper on a G train should cost like 1465 yuan. Which is just 85 yuan more than the 1380 yuan ticket in first class seat.

Would you like to try and spend your day working in an upper hard sleeper of a G train?
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Old August 24th, 2013, 04:46 AM   #5383
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While at present I can still seat in a vehicle for 8 hour and continue my busines when offboard. But as I'm getting older things will be tough.

Even in RMB1465 it's still in the same range with air fare and since most sleeper schedules are overnight trips, people can save the travel time entirely if they can have a good sleep on the train. So for Beijing-Guangzhou overnight trip I will go for Sleeper option.
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Old August 24th, 2013, 10:17 AM   #5384
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Even in RMB1465 it's still in the same range with air fare and since most sleeper schedules are overnight trips, people can save the travel time entirely if they can have a good sleep on the train.
Yes - if the sleeper actually is "overnight". Which is not the case with longer train trips. Nor, for some reason, with high speed trains.
Say Beijing-Guangzhou. I must have missed the fastest possibility - it is T15. 20 hours 31 minutes. Leaving 11:01, arriving 7:32.
You may have good sleep on the train, and arrive in Guangzhou well rested, having eaten a good breakfast in train restaurant and ready to embark on Guangzhou Metro to reach your destination in Guangzhou between 8 and 9. But the problem is, you will have spent most of the previous day on the train as well. You could instead have left Beijing rather later than 11:01, flown to Guangzhou and spent a hotel night there.
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So for Beijing-Guangzhou overnight trip I will go for Sleeper option.
Yes, but how about overday trip? Like G71, departure 8:00, arrival 17:38 - not really time for night´s sleep. Would you prefer business class seat, or a sleeper bunk?
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Old August 25th, 2013, 07:37 AM   #5385
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Now when this HSR line is finished thru Gansu & Xinjiang surely there will be sleeper cars on whatever replaces T35/T38. Currently G96/G97 is the fastest Guangzhou Nan to Xian taking 7h 40' for 2119km, requiring 14h 15' for the remaining 2565km at a D train average 180km/h. Or will flying remain the only option to T35?
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Old August 26th, 2013, 05:41 PM   #5386
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IMO it's a waste not using the HSR tracks at night time. It'll be fascinating if they can install the Japanese invented pea pods sleepers
What's the major advantage this system has over the current sleeper trains? It seems to be less efficient use of space, less privacy, and provides less luggage space.

HSR tracks are maintenance intensive so it's good that they are taking the time to do repairs and inspections during the night. During which the upgraded conventional lines can be used to run overnight trains.
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Old August 27th, 2013, 05:40 AM   #5387
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It's like an upgraded version of sleeper coach so it should be confortable sleeping there. And the concept is inspired by capsule hotel so it should be space efficient (assume its' double deck). Let alone the customized HSR coach which give passenger good view while travelling. I know it'll lead to cost issue but the concept is pretty attractive.

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Old August 28th, 2013, 12:37 AM   #5388
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I think it's more comfortable than hard sleeper but I would take soft sleeper over this anyday, this design's biggest problem compare to soft sleeper is privacy and access to amenities. But yeah for the same space you can fit six pea pods but only four soft sleeper bunks.
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Old August 28th, 2013, 07:12 AM   #5389
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But yeah for the same space you can fit six pea pods but only four soft sleeper bunks.
Or six hard sleeper bunks.
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 05:01 AM   #5390
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Nanchang Railway Bureau, Jingxi Province



by Luo chunxiao
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 05:15 AM   #5391
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Train ticket cancellation fees to rise
28 August 2013
Shenzhen Daily

RAILWAY travelers will be able to cancel or return tickets at any railway station in the country but also could be subject to significantly increased cancellation fees under new regulations that take effect Sunday.

Passengers previously could only make changes at their departure station or the station where they bought the tickets. Under the new regulations, people who return tickets more than 48 hours before departure will be given a refund minus 5 percent of the fare, China Railway Corp. said.

People who cancel tickets 48 to 24 hours before departure will lose 10 percent of the cost, while 20 percent will be charged to people who return tickets less than 24 hours before departure, the railway operator said.

Previously, railways deducted only 5 percent for all cancellations.

Travelers tend to book more tickets than needed, through methods such as asking friends to book online during peak travel seasons when tickets are in short supply, or even buying tickets for different classes of seats on the same train, reducing the supply for other travelers.

The trend invariably leads to high cancellation numbers, especially 24 hours before a train’s scheduled departure time. Railway authorities said the new regulations are aimed at cutting the high cancellation rates and easing demand during peak seasons.

Additionally, canceling tickets has become much easier since the start of online ticket sales in late 2011, shortly before the Spring Festival travel peak, when millions of Chinese ride trains during the nation’s biggest annual holiday.

From January to mid-July this year, there was a 77.6- percent rise in ticket cancellations compared to the same period last year.

The Spring Festival peak saw triple the average daily level of cancellations and a 110-percent rise compared to the same time last year. The pre-summer vacation period saw the cancellation rate double from a year ago.

About 74 percent of the cancellations occurred less than 24 hours before departure, while only 15 percent occurred more than 48 hours in advance.

(SD-Agencies)
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 09:01 PM   #5392
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Those pictures from Jingxi province are beautiful. This generally confuses me when I see a CRH1 on a conventional line. Does that mean these CRH1's run at high speed (200km/h) on these lines or are CRH1's sometimes used in place of conventional trains for conventional service?
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 10:57 PM   #5393
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Are they conventional lines or upgraded lines?

Are they perhaps shared conventional lines that lead from stations to highspeed tracks?
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 11:52 PM   #5394
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The answer is both, they run on newly constructed CR Grade 1 Trunk Lines which is the highest level of conventional rail lines in China, they are capable of supporting 200-250km/h EMU trains, 160km/h conventional passenger trains, and 120-140km/h freight trains. They also run on upgraded conventional lines which are essentially older lines upgraded to the CR Grade 1 line standard. In the former case EMUs can run at 200-250km/h most of the way, in the latter case certain sections have speed restrictions (i.e. 160km/h).

Correct me if I'm wrong but I don't think CRH1s are used on proper high speed lines (350km/h), at least not very often.
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Old September 4th, 2013, 03:43 AM   #5395
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If this is shared before, sorry for double post.

Lovely video:

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Old September 6th, 2013, 03:50 AM   #5396
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Quick question~ What is the general price per km for these high speed elevated railways? Is there such a data available? Thanx.
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Old September 6th, 2013, 04:28 AM   #5397
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~25 million/km
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Old September 6th, 2013, 04:29 AM   #5398
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yes for 300kmph HSRs such as Beijing-Shanghai, the per km fare is 0.42 RMB = US$ 0.0677
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Old September 6th, 2013, 10:54 AM   #5399
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25 million RMB or USD per km? I'd say it's RMB, right?
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Old September 6th, 2013, 11:29 AM   #5400
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Quote:
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25 million RMB or USD per km? I'd say it's RMB, right?
150 million RMB /km 25 million USD/km
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