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Old August 13th, 2008, 11:58 AM   #901
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All aboard for the "Great Wall Express"

BADALING, China, Aug 12 (Reuters) - Beijing on Tuesday unveiled the "Great Wall Express", a sleek new train service that will whisk visitors to the foot of the World Heritage Site in Olympic record time.

The Great Wall winds across more than 6,400 km (4,000 miles) and receives an estimated 10 million visitors a year, mostly to the mere 10 km opened to tourists at Badaling, the nearest stretch to Beijing.

The train will cut in half, to one hour, the time it generally takes to get to Badaling. More importantly, it will avoid the traffic jams visitors routinely face on their return into the city.

"You look at Europe, for example Switzerland, they have their own famous sightseeing trains," Zhou Zhengyu, vice head of the Beijing Municipal Committee of Communication, told reporters aboard the train.

"We want to make this into Beijing's own tourist train."

Hoping to finish the project in time for the Olympics, workers took just four months to renovate an existing rail link and touch up the historic stations along what was the first railway line China designed and built on its own, Zhou said.

"We have what we call 'China speed', 'Beijing speed'," he said, asked whether four months was perhaps a bit rushed.

The train service was formally launched ahead of the Olympics opening ceremony last week, but regular services will only begin later this week after cycling events in the area are finished.

Visitors will like the ticket prices: just 17 yuan ($2.50) for first class and 14 yuan for regular seats.

However, Zhou admitted authorities were still working out some kinks. For one, visitors will have to walk about 15 minutes from the station to the wall, at least for now.

The project is part of a massive upgrade of Beijing's infrastructure that the Olympics have helped accelerate, and that analysts say will transform the city to be based more around suburbs much like many Western cities.

The number of subway lines has already risen to eight from two over the past several years and a high-speed train now carries visitors to the nearby city of Tianjin in just half an hour.

The government aims to roughly double the length of urban rail track in the capital to 560 km (350 miles) by 2015, Zhou said.

The United Nations listed the wall as a World Heritage Site in 1987. (Editing by Nick Macfie)
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Old August 13th, 2008, 05:44 PM   #902
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Shanghai - Hangzhou - Ningbo high speed railway

From Shanghai Daily on 8/13:

Comment sought on high-speed train line
Created: 2008-8-13
Author:Dong Zhen

CITY authorities began soliciting public opinion this week in connection with a planned express railway linking Shanghai with Hangzhou, Ningbo and other cities in Zhejiang Province.

The public comment phase is usually the last planning step before ground is broken on a major infrastructure project. Construction on the planned 160-kilometer railway is scheduled to start around the end of this year.

The rail link will carry only passengers, and trains will run at short intervals to improve travel times between Shanghai and five cities in Zhejiang Province.

Trains will travel at about 300 kilometers per hour, exceeding the maximum speed of 250 kph on China's current rail services.

The line will also connect with the Shanghai-Beijing Express Railway, which will be completed by 2010.

The Shanghai-Hangzhou-Ningbo rail line will have its own terminal at the Hongqiao Transport Hub, which is under construction. Another local stop will be built in Songjiang District.
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Old August 15th, 2008, 03:35 AM   #903
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
[
The project is part of a massive upgrade of Beijing's infrastructure that the Olympics have helped accelerate, and that analysts say will transform the city to be based more around suburbs much like many Western cities.
Errr.....that isn't a good thing Beijing.
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Old August 15th, 2008, 04:06 AM   #904
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
Errr.....that isn't a good thing Beijing.
20 years ago most of the city was within the old city walls. This was then paved over into the Second Ring Road.

10 years ago there was a Third Ring Road, with the Fourth Ring Road half-done.

Now there's the 4, 5, and 6 Ring Roads, as well as eight radial highways. Thankfully most of them have exorbitant tolls to dissuade driver commuters.
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Old August 16th, 2008, 08:36 AM   #905
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
Errr.....that isn't a good thing Beijing.
Not all Western suburbs are the same like the US model.
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Old August 16th, 2008, 02:06 PM   #906
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Zhengzhou - Xian high speed rail

ERTMS order for China high-speed line
Published on 25 July 2008

A consortium formed by Ansaldo STS and Chinese firm HollySys has won the signalling and control systems contract for a new high-speed railway line in China, incorporating European-standard ERTMS Level 2 technology.
The 300km/h passenger line will be 460km long, linking Zhengzhou in Henan province and Xi’an in Shaanxi province. It is one of three high-speed train projects for which the Chinese Ministry of Railways has decided to use ERTMS (European Railway Traffic Management System).

The contract to design, build and operate the signalling and control system is worth RMB660m (£49m), of which the HollySys share is RMB151m (£11m). The work is expected to be completed by the end of 2009. Ansaldo STS is the technology leader on the project. A partnership agreement with HollySys covers local production of components and equipment, and the two companies will also create a joint venture for the future supply of ERTMS for high-speed rail links throughout China.

Earlier this year Nortel announced that it had been chosen to provide a highly secure GSM-R wireless network for communications between trains and ground staff along the line.

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Old August 18th, 2008, 12:35 AM   #907
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Quote:
By Lydia Chen | 2008-8-18 |

THE construction of the high-speed magnetic-levitation train linking Shanghai and Hangzhou has finally been given the go-ahead after more than a year of hold-ups.

While it was originally hoped that the line would be completed in time for Shanghai World Expo in 2010, that is now the year that construction is scheduled to begin.

The project was suspended amid widespread concerns among local residents that their health may be adversely affected by radiation from passing trains.

The provincial government of Zhejiang announced the decision in a 2008-2012 major construction-project plan, which included the building of a 13.42-billion-yuan (US$1.935-billion) Shanghai-Hangzhou passenger railway from 2009 to 2013, Xinhua news agency reported yesterday.

The Shanghai-Hangzhou Maglev line is expected to be completed by 2014 at a cost of 22 billion yuan, according to the Zhejiang plan.

However, the plan did not specify an exact route.

From 2008 to 2012, 6.5 billion yuan of the cost should be allocated, and the provincial office supervising the Maglev project should finish preliminary work of site selection of the Zhejiang section and environment evaluation this year, the plan said.

Total length of the Maglev line will be extended to 199.434 kilometers from 175 kilometers, including a section that connects the two cities and a minor section that links Shanghai's two international airports.

Trains on the Maglev track are expected to hit speeds of 450kmh, meaning a one-way trip will take only 30 minutes. At present bullet trains take 90 minutes.

The new Maglev route willbe separated from communities along its course in Shanghai by a greenbelt22.5 meters wide each side.
http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article...753&type=Metro
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Old August 18th, 2008, 02:35 AM   #908
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That's, what, the 12th time that maglev line is approved? I won't believe it's going down until I see some cranes working it...
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Old August 18th, 2008, 02:49 AM   #909
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its about the 100th time that is approved.... and nothing happened, so far.

I also dont believe it any more...

Dont know why Shanghai-Daily brings this news every 6 months, time and again....
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Old August 18th, 2008, 02:55 AM   #910
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Xinhua News:
Qinghai-Tibet railway to get six new lines
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Old August 18th, 2008, 03:59 AM   #911
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China gets these big infrastructure projects approved and built quickly. I wish it was the same in the U.S. HSR helps the environment so there shouldn't be much opposition from the environmental community.

We can have democracy and good infrastructure that isn't delayed too much.
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Old August 20th, 2008, 04:04 PM   #912
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HXn30001 or JT56ACe locomotive

From Railway Age on August 19 & other sources:

For EMD, a Chinese first


Electro-Motive Diesel’s first locomotive for China, an EMD-designed JT56ACe diesel-electric manufactured jointly with CNR Dalian Locomotive and Rolling Stock Co. (DLoco), left the factory in Dalian China, last month. The locomotive is China’s first 6,000-hp diesel-electric. DLoco and EMD will manufacture 300 JT56ACes for the Chinese Ministry of Railways (MoR).

“The JT56Ace was built with the needs of the Chinese market in mind,” EMD said. It is equipped with several EMD technologies, among which are dual isolated driver’s cabs, EMD’s type 265H 6,000-hp diesel engine, electronic fuel injection, a.c. traction, microcomputer control, and the ability to function in three-unit consists. Starting tractive effort is 69,700 pounds; continuous tractive effort is 65,000 pounds. The JT56ACe also includes EMD’s collision protection package, which EMD says “improves locomotive durability and driver safety.” With a 23.7-tons axle load, EMD says the JT56ACe “is the most powerful diesel-electric locomotive in the world at such a low axle load.” It can pull up to 4,900 tons at a maximum speed of 75 mph. Crew comfort was also taken into account with a microwave oven, air conditioning, refrigerator, and toilet.

EMD’s participation in the Chinese railway market began in 2001 with the licensing of radial truck technology. “With the localization of the JT56ACe, EMD looks forward to a long and fruitful relationship with the MoR, Chinese suppliers, and other Chinese customers,” EMD said.

In September 2005 EMD signed an agreement with the Chinese Ministry of Railways (MoR) and Dalian Locomotive Works (DLoco) for the supply of three hundred 6,000 horsepower locomotives, EMD's most powerful diesel-electric locomotive. The locomotives feature the latest heavy haul traction systems used on North America's major Class l railways and are being jointly designed and manufactured with DLoco under a technology license in Dalian, China.








Last edited by ANR; August 20th, 2008 at 05:47 PM. Reason: added picture
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Old August 22nd, 2008, 02:45 PM   #913
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CML 50001 or HXn 50001

From Railway Age on 8/21:

GE power en route to China


In October 2005, GE Transportation signed a $450 million contract with the Chinese Ministry of Railways (MOR) for 300 6,000-hp Evolution® Series CMLs (“China Mainline Locomotives”). The first of two fully assembled pilot locomotives, CML 50001, is on its way to Tianjin Port in Tianjin, China, and is expected to arrive on Aug. 30. After being transferred to the Tanggu Depot for inspection, CML 50001 will make its way to Beijing.

The CML series is configured a bit differently than GE’s North American Evolution Series locomotive. With a peak output of 6,250 hp, the locomotive produces about 40% more power (compared to 4,400 hp) and weighs 30% less than its western cousin. “The lighter weight design increases the eco-friendly properties of the locomotive,” GE says. “The Ecomagination-certified GEVO 16-cylinder engine generates 84% fewer emissions and increases fuel efficiency by 3-5%,” compared to a non-Evolution Series locomotive.

The balance of the CML order will be assembled in China at Qishuyan Locomotive and Rolling Stock Works (QSY) in Changzhou, using kits manufactured in Erie. Kits began shipping on May 18, 2008; delivery is expected to be completed by year-end 2009. QSY is to begin assembling locomotives in October, with all 300 CMLs delivered by June 2010. GE established three onsite teams in Changzhou, Chengdu, and Zhuzhou consisting of 20 local Chinese manufacturing and quality engineers to provide technical support for assembling the 298 kits.

“The MOR sought a product that would significantly improve hauling capability and running speed on China’s main lines, while at the same time reducing emissions to meet increasingly rigorous Chinese environmental requirements,” said GE Transportation China President Tim Schweikert. “The locomotive they will receive will meet and exceed those requirements.” He noted that GE is three months ahead of the original contract schedule.

From Erie Times-News on 8/21:

GE train engine China- bound
By Jim Martin

They're waiting for a train to arrive in Beijing.

Officials from Erie-based GE Transportation held a joint press conference Thursday with officials from the Chinese Ministry of Rail to announce the impending arrival of the first of 300 locomotives. The Chinese government placed the $450 million order in 2005.

The locomotive, which was loaded on a ship in the Port of Philadelphia, is one of just two that will be shipped whole and fully assembled. The remaining 298 locomotives will be shipped as kits, with the Chinese contributing more parts as the process moves along.

"It's on a boat right now. It's going to be here in days, and it's the first of 300 locomotives we are going to deliver," said Stephan Koller, a spokesman for the General Electric Co. unit.

The China Mainline Locomotive that will be arriving soon in China is based on the Evolution series, designed to reduce fuel costs and emissions. But it might not look familiar to Erie residents accustomed to seeing GE locomotives on local tracks. That's because this one was built specifically for the needs of the Chinese. "This is a newly designed and engineered heavy-hauling locomotive," Koller said. "It's more than 6,000 horsepower. The ones we use in North America are 4,400 horsepower. It's a 40 percent increase in power, but a 30 percent reduction in weight."

GE officials are hinting that more business from China could be on the way. GE Chief Executive Jeff Immelt said earlier this week that he expects GE's China business to double to $10 billion by 2010. "We've seen great growth in China," Immelt said in an interview with the International Herald Tribune in Beijing. "I think the whole focus on water and the environment, that's going to offer, we think, big opportunities for us as time goes on." That could also bode well for sales of the CML 50001, the Evolution-based locomotive being built for use in China. Koller stressed that no contracts have been signed and no deals struck, but that strong possibilities exist for both.

Koller said the Ministry of Rail has an aging fleet of 5,000 to 6,000 locomotives. "They will need to be replaced in years to come," Koller said. "The 300 locomotives we are delivering now, if they perform as we expect they will perform, it will position us well to be considered for replacing the aging locomotive fleet." That wouldn't necessarily translate into selling new locomotives. "If you have older locomotives, you have two choices," Koller said. "You can buy a brand-new locomotive or you take a locomotive that has been in service for many years and you can modernize it. It's the ultimate form of recycling."

Among the locomotives that might be considered for modernizing are Erie-built GE locomotives shipped to China in the 1980s, Koller said. There's reason to believe the Chinese might not wait 20 years before placing their next locomotive order. Koller said the government says it plans to invest $160 billion to upgrade the country's rail infrastructure between now and 2011. "There is huge potential," Koller said.

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Old August 22nd, 2008, 02:49 PM   #914
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great locomotives, great development.

But why do they have to be so fu**** ugly?
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Old August 22nd, 2008, 02:51 PM   #915
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Aren't locomotive supposed to be ugly ?
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Old August 22nd, 2008, 03:28 PM   #916
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not necessarily.

I think there are quite some beautyfull locomotives around. Electric- as well as Diesel locomotives. Passenger-, as well as Freight locomotives.

I know that this becomes off topic, so I stop at this point, but I post links to some pics:
Maybe, if one of the chinese bureaucrats reads this thread: Pleas build some beautyfull locomotives next time. They dont cost more, just beacause the look better.

Taurus

V200-One of the most beautfyfull diesels I know

Eurorunner Diesel-loco. At least with a little bit of industrial design-attempts

Bombaridier Electro-Cargo-Loco

not beautyfill but at least all-right-looking.
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Old August 23rd, 2008, 05:20 AM   #917
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How's the service on Chinese trains these days?
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Old August 23rd, 2008, 06:59 PM   #918
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Raw power, cost, and efficiency is important here not the look But really they look like 20 years old already
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Old August 24th, 2008, 05:27 AM   #919
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Quote:
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How's the service on Chinese trains these days?
Mostly, it's you get what you pay for. The low-class tickets are not so bad, and the high-class tickets are not so good. Of course, you'd probably get restless in a "hard seat" (lowest class seat) in a 40 hour train ride, so the service is mostly subjective.
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Old August 24th, 2008, 08:31 AM   #920
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I like steam trains
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