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Old January 11th, 2009, 02:06 PM   #1161
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China forecasts 188 million rail passengers over Lunar New Year

18 hours ago

BEIJING (AFP) — Chinese authorities are expecting 188 million people to travel by train over the Lunar New Year holiday, an important annual family get-together, a railways spokesman said Saturday.

"We predict that across the nation the railway network will receive 188 million passengers, a rise of eight per cent on the same period last year, with a daily average of 4.7 million people," Wang Yongping of the Rail Ministry told a press conference.

The Lunar New Year falls this year on January 26, but for the Chinese rail network the period between departures and returns lasts 40 days, with passenger numbers expected to peak between January 21 and 24.

Many Chinese have decided to combine their annual holidays with the festival because it falls this year in January, a month that includes three of the annual 14 national holidays.

In recent weeks official state media have frequently reported on mass movements of migrant workers from the south of China as factories close early because of a drop in demand for the good they produce.

The government in December asked provincial authorities to ensure these often exploited workers receives their wages in time for the New Year getaway. According to the official figures, China has some 210 million migrant workers.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp...j-pusCyTnuERDA
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Old January 11th, 2009, 11:13 PM   #1162
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does anyone know anything about the supposed 380 kph train? i read about it somewhere but i cant find it anywhere
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Old January 13th, 2009, 08:43 AM   #1163
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China forecasts 188 million rail passengers over Lunar New Year
10 January 2009
Agence France Presse

Chinese authorities are expecting 188 million people to travel by train over the Lunar New Year holiday, an important annual family get-together, a railways spokesman said Saturday.

"We predict that across the nation the railway network will receive 188 million passengers, a rise of eight per cent on the same period last year, with a daily average of 4.7 million people," Wang Yongping of the Rail Ministry told a press conference.

The Lunar New Year falls this year on January 26, but for the Chinese rail network the period between departures and returns lasts 40 days, with passenger numbers expected to peak between January 21 and 24.

Many Chinese have decided to combine their annual holidays with the festival because it falls this year in January, a month that includes three of the annual 14 national holidays.

In recent weeks official state media have frequently reported on mass movements of migrant workers from the south of China as factories close early because of a drop in demand for the good they produce.

The government in December asked provincial authorities to ensure these often exploited workers receives their wages in time for the New Year getaway. According to the official figures, China has some 210 million migrant workers.
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Old January 13th, 2009, 08:43 AM   #1164
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China denies closing rail industry to foreign manufacturers
10 January 2009
Agence France Presse

China Saturday denied allegations that it wanted to close its rail industry to foreign manufacturers and that it had profited from stealing their technology.

It was responding to comments made by Philippe Mellier, chief executive of French firm Alstom Transport, in a recent interview in the Financial Times newspaper.

Mellier called for a boycott of Chinese-made trains, claiming China blocked bids from foreign manufacturers.

"The (Chinese) market is gradually shutting down to let the Chinese companies prosper," Mellier said in the interview. "We're starting to see Chinese companies answering tenders around the world with Chinese freight locomotives, some of them being based on transferred technology," he said.

China's Ministry of Railways spokesman Wang Yongping responded at a press conference by calling Mellier's remarks "irresponsible."

Wang said China had developed its own high-speed train technology by co-operating with foreign firms such as Alstom.

"Foreign companies gained commercial benefits from the cooperation and we gained our own technologies. The property rights belong to Chinese companies," Wang said.

Wang said the accusation of closing China's market to foreign manufacturers was baseless.

Mellier said China was increasingly showing favouritism to its own companies when awarding contracts for big railway and underground projects such as the Shanghai-Beijing high speed line.

Meanwhile, Chinese train manufacturers were increasingly trying to beat sector giants Bombardier, Alstom and Siemens to contracts, particularly in the field of freight, Mellier said.

"If the (Chinese) market closes today, we do not think it is a good idea that other countries open their markets to such a technology because there is no longer any reciprocity," he said.
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Old January 13th, 2009, 09:29 AM   #1165
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中國的買辦官員對外只會軟棉棉無力的辯護. 不明白最好的辯護, 是針鋒相對地進行反指控.

法國佬若攻擊中國, 要外國不要賣買中國的車. 就要針鋒相對進行反攻. 如鼓勵相應方, 不

要當水魚, 買超高價, 在技術上無甚過人之處的法國佬車, 而應選擇價廉, 超值的中國車.

法國佬若攻擊中國偷他們的技術, 就問法國佬的技術是偷誰的? 偷日本的? 偷得國的? 偷中

國的?

法國佬若攻擊中國關閉本國市場, 不開放給他們. 就問法國佬為什麼在其本國不用得國車,

不用日本車? 日本為什麼什麼在其本國不用法國佬車, 不用得國佬車; 得國佬為什麼在其本

國不用日本車和法國佬車? 這三國是不是自封市場, 只選本國車?
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Old January 13th, 2009, 12:24 PM   #1166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gramercy View Post
does anyone know anything about the supposed 380 kph train? i read about it somewhere but i cant find it anywhere
I know something about a spanish 380 km/h train:

http://www.altavelocidad.org/tecnica...se-llama-avril
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Old January 13th, 2009, 04:02 PM   #1167
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thx!

this is a _very_ interesting read about the why china possibly wont go to 380 maybe not even above 350

http://www.eurotrib.com/story/2008/9/3/174412/0350
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Old January 16th, 2009, 09:49 PM   #1168
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China to double railway investment in 2009

Amid a surge in planned infrastructure projects next year aimed at boosting domestic demand, China plans to almost double its investment in railways to about 600 billion yuan ($87.9 billion).

The money is part of the 4-trillion-yuan stimulus package announced by the government earlier this year.

In 2008, China spent 330 billion yuan on railways, according to a national conference on railway construction held on Wednesday.

Part of next year's 600 billion yuan would be used to build a total of 5,148 km of new rails, said Minister of Railways Liu Zhijun at the meeting.

The money will also help put five passenger-dedicated, high-speed lines into operation next year, according to Liu. These rails will link the central city of Wuhan to the southern city of Guangzhou; Zhengzhou in central Henan province to Xi'an in northwest Shaanxi province; Ningbo to Wenzhou, both in eastern China's Zhejiang province; Wenzhou to Fuzhou in southern Fujian province; and Fuzhou to Xiamen, also in Fujian.

The ministry also planned to start 70 new projects next year with part of the money. Those projects will need a total investment of 1.5 trillion yuan to be completed, Liu said.

Rail transport strain to be eased

Liu also predicted railway travel would be much easier by 2012. Currently, there are not enough seats for all the people who want to travel, especially during the Spring Festival every year, when millions are on the move.

"There could be a historical change in the country's railway transport by 2012. The bottleneck restraints both in passenger and cargo transportation could be removed," he said.

Railways in the country would reach 110,000 km by 2012. About 13,000 km of passenger lines, which allow trains to travel between 200 to 350 km per hour, would be put into use.

"Such coverage of passenger rails should be able to ensure that passenger needs are satisfied," he said.


(Xinhua)
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Old January 18th, 2009, 02:11 AM   #1169
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Shenzhen Futian Station (part of Hong Kong - Guangzhou High Speed Rail line)

Jan.17


renderings and drawings






it will be connected with metro line 2 (also under construction) and future line 11




some info










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Old January 18th, 2009, 02:58 PM   #1170
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why shenzhen new railway station is so small? it isn't in top 40 among china new railstation(u/c & planned)
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Old January 18th, 2009, 05:31 PM   #1171
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I think it is not that small. Also, It is not a terminal destination like Beijing or Shanghai, it is more like a transit one.
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Old January 19th, 2009, 04:54 AM   #1172
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diting View Post
why shenzhen new railway station is so small? it isn't in top 40 among china new railstation(u/c & planned)
it's a station serving an almost commuter line. Shenzhen and Hongkong are directly adjecent to each other and the train will most likely run every 10 minutes. Don't need a huge terminal for an above ground "subway station".

For a better comparasion, think Beijing South Station vs Beijing West. Beijing South, although much newer, is much smaller than West.

On the other hand, Shenzhen's Main Station. Thank wikipedia.

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Last edited by UD2; January 19th, 2009 at 05:01 AM.
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Old January 19th, 2009, 05:31 AM   #1173
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There will be another station in Shenzhen on this line - Longhua Station, I think it will be much larger as it will also include costal line, here is the map:


Except for being transit station, this station will also be completely underground (first underground station in China) and it will be in the very heart of Shenzhen main CBD - in China stations are usually far from main CBD.
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Old January 19th, 2009, 06:27 AM   #1174
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nice map. FYI Shibi is where the new Guangzhou Railway Station, the largest in Asia, is being built.
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Old January 22nd, 2009, 03:33 PM   #1175
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China Railway Group Expects 2008 Net Profit To Fall Over 50%
22 January 2009

HONG KONG (Dow Jones)--China Railway Group Ltd. (0390.HK), the country's largest railway operator, said Thursday it expects its 2008 net profit to fall by more than 50%, as foreign-exchange losses offset revenue growth from new contracts.

The company said in October it incurred CNY1.94 billion worth of foreign-exchange losses on structured deposits as of Sept. 30. because of a sharp decline in the Australian dollar.

China Railway Group, which is listed in Shanghai and Hong Kong, has built over two-thirds of China's more than 75,000 kilometers of railway links and 95% of the country's electrified railway lines. It also builds expressways, bridges and tunnels.
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Old January 22nd, 2009, 04:22 PM   #1176
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China's nightmare train journeys have dream New Year destination
21 January 2009
Agence France Presse

Si Yuefeng was exhausted as he stumbled off a decrepit train after 28 hours of standing up, yet he was happy as the nightmare journey had finally brought him home for the Chinese New Year.

"No food, no hot water. I'm starving to death," the 24-year-old construction engineer said at the bustling railway station in Zhengzhou, a transport hub in central China.

Si paid just under 100 yuan (14 dollars) to make the 1,700-kilometre (1,050-mile) trip from his workplace in southwest China and arguably did not get his money's worth as there was no air-conditioning and no seat.

"It was overcrowded, the conductor even had to push some people off at the start. Otherwise the train would not be allowed to set off," he said.

Si had to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with hundreds of other people in one carriage and could not even get to the toilet for a long spell as someone had fallen asleep drunk in the lavatory.

Nevertheless, Si was all smiles as he left the Zhengzhou railway station to be picked up by his brother and return home for a once-a-year family reunion.

Si's travails are typical among the tens of millions of Chinese passengers travelling by train for the Chinese New Year, the nation's most important holiday and a time for family get-togethers that this year falls on January 26.

The government is expecting a record 188 million people to travel by train and another 24 million to fly over the 40 days before and after the New Year, in what is regarded as the biggest annual movement of people in the world.

Although China's rail network is already one of the world's biggest, it simply cannot cope with the massive demand and each year the phenomenal migration draws global headlines for the horrendous travelling conditions.

Rampant scalping is also a problem.

Zhang Ziwei, a pharmaceuticals salesman, said he had to pay a scalper a 20-percent commission for his ticket home from Zhengzhou to Guizhou province in the southwest, after days of fruitless ticket-hunting.

"It was expensive but I didn't have any other way to get a ticket," said the 22-year-old.

"Going home during the Lunar New Year is always so troublesome. But after spending a whole year away from home, I really want to go back and get together with my family.

"Speaking to them on the telephone or chatting on the Internet is not the same as being at home."

A regular train traveller for business, Zhang had a number of tactics to overcome the on-board inconveniences, including the most pressing problem of little access to toilets.

"Usually there will be long queues outside the toilets. So I'll try not to eat or drink too much on the train," he said.

"Also with the crowds squatting in the corridor, they get impatient if you pass through too often to go to the toilet."

Zhang did not resort to one of the more bizarre and humiliating tactics others adopt -- wearing nappies. Chinese companies have previously reported huge spikes in sales of large nappies during the Lunar New Year travel peak.

The government has said it expects to ease the train strains by 2012, when the country's railway lines will have been extended to 110,000 kilometres from 79,000 kilometres in 2007.

But before that, passengers will continue to have to put up with temporary fixes such as more frequent but poorly scheduled train services and the conversion of sleeper carriages into ones only with seats.

"We got on board at 2:00 am and just got off the train," said Su Xiaoqin, 27, who with her husband spent 16 hours sitting on hard seats in one of the converted carriages.

The couple had returned from their jobs in a shipyard in the eastern metropolis of Shanghai.

"My back is breaking and I just want to sleep," Su said, her arms resting on the handles of her suitcase. "But I should be grateful, at least we were able to get tickets."
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Old January 25th, 2009, 02:07 PM   #1177
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I think this is a very telling article...
Not sure how accurate all the facts as 100RMB for 1700km journey sound too low, but this isn't the most important or interesting point here.
What is more interesting is a philosophy behind the whole story/situation. Western journalist doesn't spare colors of horror describing the hardship of the journey. The clear goal is to assure readers in the West how Good have they got it and how better they are off than people in the communist dictatorship.
To be fair he mentions that the main character in the story was in the end happy. but the whole tone of the article leads to believe that this is a case because he is some how not "normal" form western point of view.
What should be actually the main point in this story is gets mentioned only briefly - the way country and system is trying to deal with this extraordinary even - namely sales of standing tickets (although the practice to charge for them a full fee is a questionable one), conversion of sleeper cars into a sitting one etc. So the point is to make sure that as much people as possible will get there - basically understanding the need of people and preparedness to do whatever it takes to satisfy it. And also the fact that that particular society is accepting this type of solution.
In the west they would simply stop selling tickets when train sitting/sleeping capacity is fully booked and that's it. No matter how much you want to get home it's your problem... Society is not prepared to pay price of seeing "ugly" scenes of overcrowded train in order to make the desire of an individual come through. It is actually quite inserting reverse side of the medal that on the face declares supremacy of an individual.

Also I wouldn't be all that hopefull that this problem will be resolved by year 2012 or anytime in teh forseable future.
It is a bit odd how extension of the railways is expected to fix this condition. This is an extraordinary situation with travel patterns significantly differing from those during the rest of the year. So, you either have to built special "new year" tracks, maintain huge number of excess rolling stock and personnel through out the year, or simply accept this as a force of nature (there is another way - to deal with it in "western style" - to simply turn the "excess" passenger off).
Alternative is to wait when tradition will , under the pressure of "modern living" subside...
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Old January 25th, 2009, 02:09 PM   #1178
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sorry Double posting..
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Old January 25th, 2009, 04:15 PM   #1179
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Quote:
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I think this is a very telling article...
Not sure how accurate all the facts as 100RMB for 1700km journey sound too low.
For the "normal fast" (pukuai) hard seat class without an air-conditioner, 1700 km cost ¥98.00

You can calculate price by simply giving rail distance and travel class using this software from a hobbyist:

http://www.ticketcalc.com/
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Old January 26th, 2009, 03:17 AM   #1180
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SimFox View Post
I think this is a very telling article...
Not sure how accurate all the facts as 100RMB for 1700km journey sound too low, but this isn't the most important or interesting point here.
What is more interesting is a philosophy behind the whole story/situation. Western journalist doesn't spare colors of horror describing the hardship of the journey. The clear goal is to assure readers in the West how Good have they got it and how better they are off than people in the communist dictatorship.
To be fair he mentions that the main character in the story was in the end happy. but the whole tone of the article leads to believe that this is a case because he is some how not "normal" form western point of view.
What should be actually the main point in this story is gets mentioned only briefly - the way country and system is trying to deal with this extraordinary even - namely sales of standing tickets (although the practice to charge for them a full fee is a questionable one), conversion of sleeper cars into a sitting one etc. So the point is to make sure that as much people as possible will get there - basically understanding the need of people and preparedness to do whatever it takes to satisfy it. And also the fact that that particular society is accepting this type of solution.
In the west they would simply stop selling tickets when train sitting/sleeping capacity is fully booked and that's it. No matter how much you want to get home it's your problem... Society is not prepared to pay price of seeing "ugly" scenes of overcrowded train in order to make the desire of an individual come through. It is actually quite inserting reverse side of the medal that on the face declares supremacy of an individual.

Also I wouldn't be all that hopefull that this problem will be resolved by year 2012 or anytime in teh forseable future.
It is a bit odd how extension of the railways is expected to fix this condition. This is an extraordinary situation with travel patterns significantly differing from those during the rest of the year. So, you either have to built special "new year" tracks, maintain huge number of excess rolling stock and personnel through out the year, or simply accept this as a force of nature (there is another way - to deal with it in "western style" - to simply turn the "excess" passenger off).
Alternative is to wait when tradition will , under the pressure of "modern living" subside...
I am totally agree with you. Generally, West has a biased view of China. You can see it clearly at bbc.com. Probably, some of you guys have already red some the stuff written by James Reynolds. He has a blog on the web site called James Reynolds' China. He writes about China and almost exclusively write about how China fails over and over on every subject. Even stories like Chinese space studies or Olympics written in a way that China is the biggest loser on Earth.

I hope one day CCTV hire a guy who writes about how Britain still has a Queen bla bla every day...
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