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Old November 10th, 2009, 08:36 PM   #1861
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Knuddel Knutsch View Post
chinese Transrapid Copy


Sorry for my ignorance.

How is this a copy ? Please explain. Thanks.

This is Shanghai maglev from Transrapid.

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Old November 11th, 2009, 04:17 AM   #1862
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They might share some technology, even can be same thing under the skin but I don't think it is an illegal reverse engineered copy.
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Old November 11th, 2009, 05:04 AM   #1863
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You must admit these two designs are 90% similar. If you put the Japanese Maglev and the German together well then nobody will say thats a copy. The Chinese im sure basically just borrowed the overall shape and form and modify it somehow to make it their own, thus cutting the cost to research a design of their own for speed reductions. Why not use something thats already available as its own was probably their idea. But hopefully in the future Chinese can be more original. I dont like anything that "Looks like" something gives people the idea we copied which in this case honestly i believe they did.
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Old November 12th, 2009, 07:26 PM   #1864
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That photo looks more like a monorail than maglev.
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Old November 12th, 2009, 08:24 PM   #1865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
That photo looks more like a monorail than maglev.
It's almost the same config as the Transrapid one.

And the Chengdu Aircraft Company isn't in the business of making monorails either.
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Old November 13th, 2009, 02:15 PM   #1866
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zergcerebrates View Post
You must admit these two designs are 90% similar. If you put the Japanese Maglev and the German together well then nobody will say thats a copy. The Chinese im sure basically just borrowed the overall shape and form and modify it somehow to make it their own, thus cutting the cost to research a design of their own for speed reductions. Why not use something thats already available as its own was probably their idea. But hopefully in the future Chinese can be more original. I dont like anything that "Looks like" something gives people the idea we copied which in this case honestly i believe they did.
Where is the patent held? Germany still?

If it uses magnetic levitation, then technically it is a copy.
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Old November 13th, 2009, 10:00 PM   #1867
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
Where is the patent held? Germany still?

If it uses magnetic levitation, then technically it is a copy.
What an ignorant statement. How else should a maglev train move?

Magnetic levitation is used in many technology.
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Old November 14th, 2009, 01:01 AM   #1868
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
Where is the patent held? Germany still?

If it uses magnetic levitation, then technically it is a copy.
OK I am speechless........

Now that brings me to the next question.

How does a Japanese maglev operate ?
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Old November 14th, 2009, 01:32 AM   #1869
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snow is red View Post

How does a Japanese maglev operate ?
You know, ignorance knows not limit and that plus the constant brainwash of their media becomes an illness that is almost almost incurable.

The Japanese have Dragon Ball! Well, Sun Wukong is actually Chinese.
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Old November 14th, 2009, 02:05 AM   #1870
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The Shanghai Maglev project included some tech transfer from the Germans. It was well published years back. One can assume some of that technology was incorporated into the new train pictured above. I find it interesting that this is an aerospace company project/product when there is no shortage of train makers in China.
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Old November 14th, 2009, 03:20 AM   #1871
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I checked the last few dozens of pages or so in this thread... the developments in China seem of a colossal scale. I had read about China's HSR plans some time in 2003 or so... At that time it didn't seem too clear which lead me to thinking that it's not gonna happen anytime soon. I didn't have much idea of how things progressed since then. It's still hard to believe that things are moving forward THAT fast.
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Old November 14th, 2009, 05:21 PM   #1872
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OMG that maglev train is the most hideous thing i have ever seen. why are Chinese designs so disgustingly atrocious? I hate to say this but the Chinese have absolutely no sense of design or aesthetics whatsoever! Everything they design turn out horrendously tacky but why!?!?! The Chinese used to be excellent designers in pre-modern era... their ships were beautiful their buildings so elegant... what happened?!?
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Old November 14th, 2009, 07:51 PM   #1873
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So you find original MAGLEV design of Germans hideous too?
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Old November 14th, 2009, 11:33 PM   #1874
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
Where is the patent held? Germany still?

If it uses magnetic levitation, then technically it is a copy.
Not so.

There are three types of maglev trains,
EDS (electrodynamic suspension), EMS (electromagnetic suspension) and stabilized permanent magnet suspension (SPM).

* For EMS, same pole electromagnets in the train repel it away from a magnetically conductive track.
* The EDS uses electromagnets on both the track and the train, to push the train away from the track.
* SPM uses opposite arrays of permanent magnets to magnetically levitate the train above the track.
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Old November 18th, 2009, 02:44 AM   #1875
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GE and China MOR Sign Strategic MOU to Advance High-Speed Rail Opportunities in the U.S.

http://www.genewscenter.com/content/...2&NewsAreaID=2
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Old November 18th, 2009, 07:29 AM   #1876
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WOW, if US and China adopt the same technology system, that's a huge market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yaohua2000 View Post
GE and China MOR Sign Strategic MOU to Advance High-Speed Rail Opportunities in the U.S.

http://www.genewscenter.com/content/...2&NewsAreaID=2

GE and China MOR Sign Strategic MOU to Advance High-Speed Rail Opportunities in the U.S.

Partnership Positions GE as first U.S. High-Speed Rail Locomotive Manufacturer

Erie, Pa., USA and Beijing, China (Nov. 17, 2009) - GE and China’s Ministry of Railways today announced that they signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to jointly advance high-speed rail (HSR) opportunities in the United States. This collaboration will allow GE Transportation to be the first U.S. locomotive manufacturer to more effectively compete for high-speed rail projects against global competitors. In addition, the partnership would accelerate GE’s passenger rail technologies and create in the near future up to 150 high technology jobs in the U.S. The announcement was made as part of "GE's Clean Technology Week in China" activities.

Lorenzo Simonelli, President and CEO of GE Transportation said, “China is a vital partner to GE Transportation’s future growth, and we find that China’s Ministry of Railways and GE share a common goal – driving high-speed rail technology development more quickly and broadly. We look forward to pursuing this collaboration.”

Tim Schweikert, President of GE Transportation China, said, “High-Speed Rail in the U.S. and in markets worldwide is a significant opportunity for infrastructure and business growth. With the signing of today's framework agreement, GE and China’s Ministry of Railways have provided the basis for a cooperation-focused framework that will enhance economic development, create new jobs and promote research and development for high-speed railway technology.

“While GE currently is the world leader in locomotive diesel-electric and electronic control systems technology, China currently is a leader in high-speed rail technology for speeds of 220 miles per hour. Working together, both parties could develop the best solutions faster to serve America’s high-speed rail needs for many years to come.”

More than $13 billion will be spent over the next five years to support higher- and high-speed rail infrastructure development in the United States. Over the next three years, China will invest about $300 billion into its railways infrastructure, expanding its network by more than 20,000 kilometers, including 13,000 kilometers of track designed for high-speed trains capable of traveling up to 220 miles per hour.

GE currently is working with China’s largest diesel locomotive manufacturing company, CSR Qishuyan Locomotive Co., Ltd., to provide China’s Ministry of Railways with the most technologically advanced, fuel-efficient and low-emissions diesel-electric, heavy-haul locomotive available to date. More than 100 of these locomotives already have been placed in revenue service by the MOR.

This current project as well as past projects in cooperation with China’s Ministry of Railways have sustained and created high technology manufacturing jobs in the U.S. for American workers to manufacture and assemble key components essential to these types of projects.

The signing of the framework agreement on high-speed railway cooperation reflects a partnership expansion between GE and China’s Ministry of Railways and has the potential for 3,500 U.S. jobs to support HSR development. By terms of the framework agreement at least 80% of the content of any potential high-speed locomotives or signaling equipment would be sourced from U.S. suppliers, and all final assembly would be performed in the U.S.
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Old November 18th, 2009, 07:37 AM   #1877
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conc.man View Post
WOW, if US and China adopt the same technology system, that's a huge market.
Don't forget that regular Chinese and North American railroads are already 100% compatible (same track gauge, loading gauge, coupling and braking standards). Extending that compatibility into other areas of rail transport should not be much of a stretch.

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Old November 18th, 2009, 11:40 AM   #1878
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I haven't been able to find an answer to this question yet : at 350kph, what would be the most energy hungry, TGV or Maglev ?
And when the TGV ran at 575kph, did it use more or less energy then the Japanese maglev running at the same speed ?
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Old November 18th, 2009, 03:13 PM   #1879
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Substructure View Post
I haven't been able to find an answer to this question yet : at 350kph, what would be the most energy hungry, TGV or Maglev ?
And when the TGV ran at 575kph, did it use more or less energy then the Japanese maglev running at the same speed ?
Hypothetically, based on physics it's fairly a clear cut answer, Maglev.
First of all aerodynamic-wise, Maglevs have much less drag since it does not need bogies.
Second, no friction between wheel and rail.
Last no mechanical power transfer loss leading to much more efficient rely of energy to motion.
Of course there are unique energy consumption requirements for Maglevs such as power for mechanical coolants to maintain superconductivity for case of JR method but I believe it is trivial compared to the build up of drag by the boogies for Wheel to rail method.
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Old November 19th, 2009, 11:38 AM   #1880
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Bridge pier collapse kills one in east China

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2...nt_9004260.htm

When: 2009-11-19 00:10 CST (GMT+08:00)
Where: Shanghai-Hangzhou High-Speed Rail
Who: Zhang Kunxiang from Guizhou, 32 yrs old, killed; 5 others, 4 from Guizhou, 1 from Sichuan, injured





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