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Old November 19th, 2009, 12:12 PM   #1881
yaohua2000
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Driver's lost key makes the whole train wait

Time: 2009-08-03 18:16–20:16
Location: Tianjin Railway Station, platform 7

http://news.enorth.com.cn/system/200...04148369.shtml

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A high-speed CRH5 train had to postpone its departure time for two hours because the driver couldn’t find his key. The train D175 between Tianjin and Shenyang North stops at Tianjin station. “The key was lost during a work transfer, because the drivers for the route are different in each direction,” said the spokesman for the Tianjin Railway Station.

The train even broadcast news of the lost key on the train, asking passengers on board to help look for it. “We looked in the corners around our seats and the clerks and train crew also came around each carriage with flashlights, but with no result,” said a passenger who waited on the platform sweating.

The railway station had to call the Beijing Headquarters to bring a back-up emergency key.

The train finally departed from Tianjin Station after a two-hour delay.






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Old November 19th, 2009, 05:31 PM   #1882
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that s funny. it reminded me seinfeld's comic about plane keys and pilots.
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Old November 19th, 2009, 06:06 PM   #1883
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are you kidding me? lost the key!? that's so funny.
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Old November 19th, 2009, 08:17 PM   #1884
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^

LOL!!!!!!

somebody's getting fired...
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Old November 19th, 2009, 08:19 PM   #1885
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^

LOL!!!!!!

somebody's getting fired...
literally
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Old November 20th, 2009, 07:55 AM   #1886
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GE Transportation to Provide 300 Locomotive Assemblies to CSR Qishuyan in China

ERIE, Pa. & BEIJING

GE Transportation announced today that it has reached an agreement with CSR Qishuyan Locomotive Co., Ltd. to provide 300 locomotive assemblies for China HXN5 Mainline locomotives produced by CSR Qishuyan with Evolution Series diesel engines. The agreement helps to sustain close to 1,200 high-tech jobs in the U.S. The announcement was made as part of "GE's Clean Technology Week in China" activities.

The agreement follows an order of 300 Evolution Series China Mainline Locomotives originally placed in 2005. According to the agreement, GE Transportation will supply 300 locomotive assemblies that will be manufactured in Erie and Grove City, Pennsylvania, USA and shipped to China. The assemblies contain key components of the diesel engines and locomotive control systems that will be built into Evolution Series China Mainline locomotives assembled in China. The first batch of the locomotive assemblies is scheduled for delivery at the beginning of 2010. Lorenzo Simonelli, President and CEO of GE Transportation said, “China has been a vital partner to GE Transportation’s growth for close to 30 years. We are looking forward to building on our mutually beneficial company-to-country partnership.”

“GE Transportation’s rail technology is an integral part of China’s sustainable infrastructure development and increases China’s usage of the most fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly locomotives in its fleet,” said Tim Schweikert, President of GE Transportation China. “China’s Ministry of Railways sought a product that would significantly improve hauling capability and running speed on the China Mainline, while at the same time reduce emissions to meet increasingly rigorous environmental requirements. GE’s Evolution Series met those requirements.”

In October 2005, GE Transportation signed an agreement with China’s Ministry of Railways to supply three hundred 6,250-horsepower Evolution Series HXN5 China Mainline Locomotives. As of today, more than one hundred of those 300 Evolution Series HXN5 China Mainline Locomotives assembled in-country by CSR Qishuyan already have been placed in revenue service by the Ministry of Railways in China. Since 2005, GE Transportation realized US$ 1.2 billion in sales by serving the Chinese marketplace. The locomotive assemblies are based on GE’s Evolution technology, the result of an eight-year, $400- million development effort to produce the most technologically advanced, fuel-efficient and low emissions diesel-electric, heavy-haul locomotive to date.

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HXN5 Mainline locomotive
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Old November 20th, 2009, 08:58 AM   #1887
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Please, can they come up with another name besides Hexie!
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Old November 20th, 2009, 05:51 PM   #1888
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Substructure View Post
I haven't been able to find an answer to this question yet : at 350kph, what would be the most energy hungry, TGV or Maglev ?
And when the TGV ran at 575kph, did it use more or less energy then the Japanese maglev running at the same speed ?
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Originally Posted by Tri-ring View Post
Hypothetically, based on physics it's fairly a clear cut answer, Maglev.
First of all aerodynamic-wise, Maglevs have much less drag since it does not need bogies.
Second, no friction between wheel and rail.
Last no mechanical power transfer loss leading to much more efficient rely of energy to motion.
Of course there are unique energy consumption requirements for Maglevs such as power for mechanical coolants to maintain superconductivity for case of JR method but I believe it is trivial compared to the build up of drag by the boogies for Wheel to rail method.


TGV only needs to apply energy to maintain its mumentuum at high speeds ... drag aplies to both TGV/HSR and Maglev almost in the same manner.

The friction is the downfall of wheel on rail ... the energy consumption is the downfall of the maglev system.


Offtopic ... what's the difference between THIS track:


... and THIS track:


(sorry~: didn't find any good picture of the chinese HSR with trains in service)
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Old November 20th, 2009, 07:16 PM   #1889
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One *BIG* advantage with steel wheel/rail is that should the HSR track go down for whatever reason, the trains can still cross over to nearby conventional lines and continue on to their destinations at slower speed.

Mike
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Old November 20th, 2009, 09:18 PM   #1890
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German Firm Wins Major Rail Deal in China

16 November 2009
Railway-Technology.com

China's Ministry of Railways has awarded a €500m contract to German firm Knorr-Bremse to supply subsystems for its new CRH3 high-speed trains. The company will equip a total of 2,720 trains with braking and door systems, out of which 1,280 will also be fitted with air-conditioning systems. Supply is scheduled to begin in the final quarter of 2009 and run until 2012.

The CRH3 trains, being built by Chinese manufacturers Tangshan Locomotive & Rolling Stock Works and Changchun Railway Vehicles, will operate at speeds of up to 350kmph mainly between Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou.

The order marks the biggest-ever contract for the German firm.
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Old November 21st, 2009, 01:52 AM   #1891
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"2,720 trains"

this number is unreal. Are all of these for CHR3? Also, how come half of trains dont have AC. A modern bullet train without AC sounds ridiculous.
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Old November 21st, 2009, 02:22 AM   #1892
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxmulder View Post
"2,720 trains"

this number is unreal. Are all of these for CHR3? Also, how come half of trains dont have AC. A modern bullet train without AC sounds ridiculous.
I think its more like 2720 carriages, which would translate to /8 = 340 pieces.
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Old November 21st, 2009, 08:56 AM   #1893
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how come half of trains dont have AC
I would think a different supplier will be supplying the balance of AC systems. With big orders like these, subcontractors probably don't have the manufacturing capacity to fullfill them alone.
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Old November 21st, 2009, 03:50 PM   #1894
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sotavento View Post


TGV only needs to apply energy to maintain its mumentuum at high speeds ... drag aplies to both TGV/HSR and Maglev almost in the same manner.

The friction is the downfall of wheel on rail ... the energy consumption is the downfall of the maglev system.
I see you're shooting yourself in the foot AGAIN.
First of all drag does apply in the same manner with HSR and Maglev(love your creative figure of speech) but because HSR needs downforce to maintain optimum traction between rail and wheel it develops more drag than Maglevs designed for neutral lift.
(Drag also develops at parts sticking out of the body like boogies while maglevs with it's streamline design creates minimum drag.)

Friction(drag as well as rail to wheel contact) also means energy consumption because it's becomes resistance against forward motion, energy consumed is transfer into heat and noise.
Which do you think generates more noise and heat at same speed Maglevs or HSR?
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 01:21 AM   #1895
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http://www.infrastructurist.com/2009...-part-6-china/

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THE REAL WORLD
Meet The Train Makers, Part 6: ChinaPosted on Friday November 20th by Yonah Freemark.
This is the 6th installment in our series on high-speed rail manufacturers around the world. Previous stories looked at:


» Bombardier
» Japanese train makers
» Siemens
» Talgo
» and Alstom.
****************

Introduction

More than any other country, China has taken advantage of the recession to pursue a reconstruction of its transportation networks. And with hundreds of billions of dollars slated for construction of new high-speed railways, China’s future increasingly seems to be one that will be defined by its trains.

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Thousands of miles of new tracks will necessitate thousands of vehicles, and indeed, China has already become the world’s largest high-speed train market. So far, the country’s trains have been evolution of foreign designs manufactured by Chinese companies, but fully local products are already emerging. When the nation is able to offer independent technology, it could be a big player on the world stage, but it’s not quite there yet.

History

China’s race to modernize its rail lines began earlier this decade, with the first high-speed intercity operations opening in 2003 between Qinhuangdao and Shenyang, some 250 miles apart. The first trains that operated on the Qinshen passenger railway offered services at up to 125 mph.

That line, however, was just the first among many, and China is rapidly improving its rail offerings. In 2008, in coordination with the Olympics Games, the Beijing-Tianjin Intercity Railway opened, bringing the cities within thirty minutes of one another, down from 70. With new trains capable of 220 mph, that corridor hosts the world’s fastest conventional trains.

Much of the rest of the country’s exhaustive rail network, which will open in stages over the next decade, will have trains that run at similar speeds. The Beijing-Shanghai Express Railway, notably, will shuttle passengers 820 miles between the country’s two biggest cities in just four hours. It will open in 2012.

For decades, the publicly owned Chinese National Railway Locomotive and Rolling Stock company was charged with producing the country’s trains. In 2001, however, the government decided to split the company in two, forming the China South (CSR) and China North (CNR) enterprises, each of which, with about 100,000 employees, would own their own factories and produce distinct trains, though they would cooperate on designs. Though both companies would be government-controlled, they were charged with signing cooperation agreements with foreign manufacturers and constructing new trains for the country’s railways. Together, the two companies dominate China’s rail manufacturing landscape.

The first high-speed train offered on the Chinese market was the China Star (top of page), which was designed entirely by domestic engineers. Introduced in 2002, the train is capable of 170 mph operating speeds (faster than any American train) and has reached 200 mph during testing.

But this local effort was doomed by a country that wanted more from its trains, and only one example was built. Chinese engineers wanted help from foreign companies for their next trains — because they wanted the best technology on domestic soil.

Help they got — from all four major international players, Bombardier, Kawasaki, Siemens, and Alstom. Working in close collaboration with these foreign companies, China was able to develop trains specific to the domestic market that replicate those offered elsewhere.


Bombardier formed an alliance with Sifang, a subsidiary of CSR, to produce the CRH 1 (above), which can operate at speeds of up to 155 mph. Sifang also cooperated with Kawasaki to import Shinkansen technologies for the CRH 2, which is similar to the E2 Shinkansen that is no longer in production on the Japanese market.


Meanwhile, CNR invested in technology from Siemens and Alstom. The CRH 3 (above), which is the country’s fastest train, is a derivative of the Siemens Velaro vehicle also used in Germany, Spain, and Russia. It is now produced in a plant owned by CNR subsidiary Tangshan Railway Vehicle. The CRH 5 (below), meanwhile, is closely related to Alstom’s Pendolino and it is produced in CNR’s Changchun plant.

The first examples of each of the four trains was produced in the exporting manufacturer’s respective home country. Thereafter, using agreements called “technology transfers,” the two Chinese rail manufacturers gained the right to reproduce the product exactly as designed in local manufacturing plants. In many ways, this process is no different than that required for many American transit vehicle acquisitions, in which a majority of parts must be made in the United States to meet federal guidelines. Yet China’s willingness to demand that foreign manufacturers abandon their patented technology to Chinese industrial concerns is taking the situation a full step further.

Today

In 2004, Siemens offered its trains to Chinese buyers, but its bid was refused until the German company opened up to a higher degree of technological transfer; with a huge market available, Siemens was content to take a recent order of CRH 3 trains (below) with only 18% of the content actually made by Siemens.

Bombardier, which claims it has developed the world’s fastest train in the 236 mph Zefiro, has agreed to a similar lessening of its share. Though it received a contract for 80 examples of the train, the Canadian company will get less than 50% of total proceeds, with the rest going to CSR’s Sifang unit. Both Bombardier and Siemens evidently see these deals as the price of doing business in the world’s soon-to-be-biggest economy.

But Alstom has proven less happy about the deal, intentionally denying China access to its newest AGV train technologies and instead offering it only less advanced Pendolino trainsets. The CEO of the French company, Philippe Mellier, said of China, “They will use them, adapt them, aggregate them to [form] a Chinese technology based on foreign technology being leased by them.” He cites his own experience working with South Koreans on a similar technology transfer deal ten years back, arguing that the South Koreans have “developed” their own technology based directly on Alstom’s ingenuity. In other words, it’s something close to legalized stealing.

In the short term, though, Western countries are likely to benefit from the large number of contracts being signed in Beijing. But in the longer term, Chinese companies like CNR or CSR, strengthened by a huge domestic market, could prove formidable competitors to the likes of Alstom and Siemens.

The two corporations are already selling local and commuter trains to operators in countries as far removed as Australia, Namibia, and Mongolia; why are indigenously produced high-speed offerings any more difficult to imagine? After years of working directly with Western companies and understanding their advanced rolling stock from front to back, it seems likely that China will be competing with them sometime soon.
A nice article that I found about high-speed railways in China and internationally (there are some nice pictures of the ChinaStar, CRH1, CRH3, and CRH5). My favourite part is when they discuss about Alstom and how they basically kicked themselves in the a** for listening to a arrogant CEO that has gotten them lock-out and disregarded for the next couple of centuries in doing high-speed rail business in China

Last edited by Nozumi 300; November 22nd, 2009 at 03:41 AM.
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 01:47 AM   #1896
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Originally Posted by Tri-ring View Post
I see you're shooting yourself in the foot AGAIN.
First of all drag does apply in the same manner with HSR and Maglev(love your creative figure of speech) but because HSR needs downforce to maintain optimum traction between rail and wheel it develops more drag than Maglevs designed for neutral lift.
(Drag also develops at parts sticking out of the body like boogies while maglevs with it's streamline design creates minimum drag.)

Friction(drag as well as rail to wheel contact) also means energy consumption because it's becomes resistance against forward motion, energy consumed is transfer into heat and noise.
Which do you think generates more noise and heat at same speed Maglevs or HSR?
HSR doesn't require any downforce created by aerodynamics. The weight of the vehicle is sufficient. Even a high powered HSR train would only have the tractive effort, where downforce would be of any use, at lower speeds when the air is passing too slow to generate the downforce.
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 10:18 PM   #1897
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nozumi 300 View Post
http://www.infrastructurist.com/2009...-part-6-china/



A nice article that I found about high-speed railways in China and internationally (there are some nice pictures of the ChinaStar, CRH1, CRH3, and CRH5). My favourite part is when they discuss about Alstom and how they basically kicked themselves in the a** for listening to a arrogant CEO that has gotten them lock-out and disregarded for the next couple of centuries in doing high-speed rail business in China
Yup that's what I am thinking too. As people here can see, the German, Japanese and Canadians are winning more and more contracts in China except the French, not even a single report for a single contract.
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 11:29 PM   #1898
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Yup that's what I am thinking too. As people here can see, the German, Japanese and Canadians are winning more and more contracts in China except the French, not even a single report for a single contract.
I'm not sure Alstom is to be blamed here. We will regret this the day the first chinese train is running on the german lines..
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 11:33 PM   #1899
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Originally Posted by foxmulder View Post
"2,720 trains"

this number is unreal. Are all of these for CHR3? Also, how come half of trains dont have AC. A modern bullet train without AC sounds ridiculous.
I'm thinking half of the trains are for the notheast of China which will not require a/c due to the weather in that area.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 01:19 AM   #1900
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I'm thinking half of the trains are for the notheast of China which will not require a/c due to the weather in that area.
Even so, it doesn't make sense to me. By doing so you are effectively limiting the area you can use the trains. Decreasing flexibility for planners. It should be that expensive to have AC. All the cars today have them right?
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