daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 21st, 2013, 03:21 PM   #3281
da_scotty
Registered User
 
da_scotty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Oss/Delft
Posts: 3,357
Likes (Received): 791

On a side note... Those Gantry Signs are pure horror, unclear, messy and way to chunky!

The regular signs on the side of the road are just fine, clear and simple!
__________________
Student at Delft University of Technology specializing in Transport & Infrastructure and Airport Design.
da_scotty no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old May 21st, 2013, 04:28 PM   #3282
sotonsi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,562

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The amount of grade-separated dual carriageways is circa 2700 - 2800 kilometers, or circa 1,700 miles. Not all of these will comply to rigid motorway standards though, but it gives an idea.
A great deal of them have right turns with minor roads using central reservation gaps, though, so aren't really 'fully grade-separated', just 'grade-separated much of the time'. Driveways are a less bothersome problem in rural areas, and I was excluding them (like Michelin does) to get my low figure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stahlsturm View Post
I'm looking for a paper map (or rather, a series of those) that'll show me those somewhat reliably.
Ordnance Survey Landrangers (see http://www.maptasm.com/ online for what it looks like)? Your best bet for a cheap hit is an Atlas that shows junction details - A Navigator, or an AZ atlas.

Though Michelin atlases do standard of the road better than anyone else (and mark GSJs like the AA, etc), no one really likes their UK mapping - the colour scheme is all wrong for the road network and the standard of road stuff isn't seen as that useful.

Even a bargain bin GB Road Atlas from Collins/AA is fairly reliable at showing where there is grade-separation (even if they don't tell you what direction it is in - only a few junctions where the priority isn't what you would have guessed).

----

Today, the Government have launched a consultation for a Lower Thames Crossing.

https://www.gov.uk/government/organi...hames-crossing

The 3 options:
  • Another crossing at Dartford, with the tunnels being used for local traffic
  • A crossing between the A1089 at Tilbury and Swanscombe, with a link road passing through Ebbsfleet to the A2
  • A crossing between Tilbury Marshes and Chalk (so east of Tilbury and Gravesend), with access roads linking to the M2/A2/A289 at Park Pale and the M25 at North Ockendon (and I imagine a couple of intermediate junctions). This has a variant which widens the A229 between the M2 and M20.
sotonsi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2013, 06:09 PM   #3283
piotr71
Registered User
 
piotr71's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Beskidy
Posts: 4,300

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stahlsturm View Post
I'm looking for a paper map (or rather, a series of those) that'll show me those somewhat reliably.
Michelin atlas shows everything precisely. Every roundabouts, junctions and their shapes and even farm entrances on single and dual carriageways. I will post some examples soon.
__________________
piotr71 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2013, 06:14 PM   #3284
Road_UK
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Mayrhofen AT, Sneek NL, Bromley UK
Posts: 5,855
Likes (Received): 1599

My favourite atlases (Britain, France and Europe) has always been from Phillips, not to be confused with the electronic manufacturers.
Road_UK no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2013, 11:02 PM   #3285
Moravian
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 747
Likes (Received): 930

The highway A23 Central London - Brighton (at the start and finish of the important road):



Moravian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2013, 11:36 PM   #3286
piotr71
Registered User
 
piotr71's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Beskidy
Posts: 4,300

A propos A23:

Quote:
Current Progress: April 2013

The first phase of the works is close to completion and despite some very poor weather during the later half of 2012, we have:

Completed the first phase of southbound carriageway temporary widening including rebuilding the eastern and central sections of the southbound Slaugham Bridge.
Completed new accesses to the East Park and Stanbridge properties.
Completed earthworks shaping, drainage and most of the surfacing to the new Warninglid northbound junction.
Constructed two balancing ponds near the closed Slaugham junction.
Diverted 1500 metres of water mains pipes and 900 metres of electricity cables.
Closed Slaugham junction.
http://www.highways.gov.uk/roads/roa...to-warninglid/
__________________
piotr71 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 27th, 2013, 06:40 PM   #3287
geogregor
Registered User
 
geogregor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: London
Posts: 15,528
Likes (Received): 19203

I had a day off today so decided to have some geeky walk around the M25/M23 junction. Here are the shots:
M25 from A23 at Merstham










And from the pedestrian bridge










Two shots on the London-Brighton railway line
Looking north:


Looking south:
M25 goes under the railway bridge

Last edited by geogregor; June 27th, 2013 at 06:49 PM.
geogregor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 27th, 2013, 06:47 PM   #3288
geogregor
Registered User
 
geogregor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: London
Posts: 15,528
Likes (Received): 19203

Looking from Rockshaw Rd over the M23 south to M25/M23 junction


M23 north


Slip roads from M23 to M25




Now views from the Warwick Wold Rd west at the junction






Looking east:


Slip roads from the M25 to M23






geogregor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 27th, 2013, 06:55 PM   #3289
geogregor
Registered User
 
geogregor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: London
Posts: 15,528
Likes (Received): 19203

Walking along the south side of the M25 back towards Merstham. It looks quite rural just off such a major road.


Now views from another pedestrian bridge in Merstham.


No need of explaining where are we looking




Southern train




Thameslink train


Last shot at the pedestrian bridge.
geogregor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 27th, 2013, 08:27 PM   #3290
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,612
Likes (Received): 19400



ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 28th, 2013, 12:17 PM   #3291
Mackem
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Here there & everywhere
Posts: 123
Likes (Received): 8

Most of these "announcements" are going over what has gone before. The A14 toll idea has been announced probably more times than I've driven on it (generally 4-6 times a week), in the hope that it will eventually get some support.

So far we've built a guided busway, but how that was supposed to cure a problem for a road where much of the traffic is from the north of England trying to get to the south east is beyond me.

Problem is we have no money but we're trying to pretend we have by talking about schemes up to 30 years ahead.............
__________________

geogregor liked this post
Mackem no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 28th, 2013, 12:49 PM   #3292
geogregor
Registered User
 
geogregor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: London
Posts: 15,528
Likes (Received): 19203

What are all those "managed motorway" schemes? Just a hard shoulder running? I think it is trying to solve problem on the cheap, without realizing potential problems in the future. First with the capacity but also with the safety.
So far the managed motorways were rather short stretches far between and loaded with cameras and variable signs. I read on some forum that those new schemes will have less monitoring and control. Even some police forces are concern about their proliferation. Hard shoulders exist for a good reason, so the emergency services have easy and uninterrupted access to the accident sites.

Surely all these cheap solutions might have impact on safety.
geogregor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 28th, 2013, 03:32 PM   #3293
sotonsi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,562

Quote:
Originally Posted by geogregor View Post
What are all those "managed motorway" schemes? Just a hard shoulder running? I think it is trying to solve problem on the cheap, without realizing potential problems in the future. First with the capacity but also with the safety.
Also variable speed limits.
sotonsi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 28th, 2013, 03:50 PM   #3294
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,612
Likes (Received): 19400

Managed motorways are not as cost-effective as it appears. Of course the initial investment is lower because it can utilize existing pavement, but they have higher operational costs. CCTV, detection and electronic signs don't live to 30 years.

It's quite notable that the current budget for Britains motorways and trunk road network is lower than the budget for motorways and trunk roads in the Netherlands, while Britain has 4 times more population (and tax base).
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 28th, 2013, 06:02 PM   #3295
Mackem
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Here there & everywhere
Posts: 123
Likes (Received): 8

Quote:
Originally Posted by geogregor View Post
What are all those "managed motorway" schemes? Just a hard shoulder running? I think it is trying to solve problem on the cheap, without realizing potential problems in the future. First with the capacity but also with the safety.
So far the managed motorways were rather short stretches far between and loaded with cameras and variable signs. I read on some forum that those new schemes will have less monitoring and control. Even some police forces are concern about their proliferation. Hard shoulders exist for a good reason, so the emergency services have easy and uninterrupted access to the accident sites.

Surely all these cheap solutions might have impact on safety.
We try to pretend that they are cheap road widening, but they end up as long slip roads to junctions. They also have over enthusiastic operators on the message boards - 20mph being a regular limit at night time works. Plenty of speed cameras on the back of the overhead gantries though.
Mackem no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2013, 01:30 AM   #3296
flierfy
Registered User
 
flierfy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,886
Likes (Received): 296

Quote:
Originally Posted by geogregor View Post
Hard shoulders exist for a good reason, so the emergency services have easy and uninterrupted access to the accident sites.
Hard shoulders do exist for several reasons. Yet, providing space for emergency vehicles is not among them.
__________________
Rippachtal.de
flierfy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2013, 02:49 AM   #3297
Tom 958
Registered User
 
Tom 958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: near Atlanta
Posts: 786
Likes (Received): 163

What are "super-connected cities"?
Tom 958 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2013, 02:57 AM   #3298
sotonsi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,562

Quote:
Originally Posted by flierfy View Post
Hard shoulders do exist for several reasons. Yet, providing space for emergency vehicles is not among them.
Maybe not in Germany, where they do that good make-path-in-middle thing, but in the UK its a different story...
sotonsi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2013, 02:32 PM   #3299
flierfy
Registered User
 
flierfy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,886
Likes (Received): 296

Quote:
Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
Maybe not in Germany, where they do that good make-path-in-middle thing, but in the UK its a different story...
It is the same story in the UK. Emergency vehicles need to be quick. Hence they use the carriageway as any other vehicle.
Just a tiny fraction of all roads is equipped with hard shoulders. And even there where one is in place they are discontinuous at several places. If emergency crews would rely on hard shoulders they wouldn't reach their operating site very often.
__________________
Rippachtal.de
flierfy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2013, 04:03 PM   #3300
geogregor
Registered User
 
geogregor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: London
Posts: 15,528
Likes (Received): 19203

Quote:
Originally Posted by flierfy View Post
It is the same story in the UK. Emergency vehicles need to be quick. Hence they use the carriageway as any other vehicle.
Just a tiny fraction of all roads is equipped with hard shoulders. And even there where one is in place they are discontinuous at several places. If emergency crews would rely on hard shoulders they wouldn't reach their operating site very often.
Crew of the emergency vehicles might not be using the hard shoulders but other drivers can easily move onto them thus creating wider path for the emergency vehicle.
geogregor no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
highways, motorway, united kingdom

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium