daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 6th, 2009, 05:43 PM   #121
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

MTR's border train fares seen by many as unreasonably high
27 May 2009
South China Morning Post

Most residents find the fares for MTR train services to the border unreasonable, a survey has found.

The train was the most popular mode of transport for Hongkongers crossing the border, the Chinese University survey showed. Some 51.4 per cent of respondents said the fares were "unreasonable" and 8.8 per cent said they were "very unreasonable". Thirty-three per cent found the fares "reasonable".

Chinese University surveyed 507 residents, aged 18 or above, on cross-border infrastructure between Hong Kong and Shenzhen in February.

The poll found more than 90 per cent visited Shenzhen at least once a year, while 20.4 per cent visited at least once a month. About 2.6 per cent went to the city almost daily.

Most of the travellers - 77.1 per cent - rode the train.

The cross-border coach was the second-most popular, with 22.2 per cent using it.

Asked to choose their preferred measures for improving cross-border infrastructure, 43.8 per cent of respondents wanted more 24-hour crossings, while 33.1 per cent preferred to have the checkpoints either moved closer together or merged.

The Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong high-speed railway, which is due to come into service in 2015, was the top cross-border infrastructure project for 44.8 per cent of respondents. That was followed by a rail link between the MTR West Rail and Lok Ma Chau Spur Line - the choice of 39.4 per cent.

Some 19 per cent selected the railway line linking the Hong Kong and Shenzhen airports. Shenzhen Mayor Xu Zongheng said earlier that construction of the line would not start until 2011.

More than 53 per cent believed that the development of cross-border infrastructure would affect Hong Kong positively, but 18.3 per cent felt it would have a negative impact. Another 18.1 per cent said it would have no impact.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old July 12th, 2009, 05:36 PM   #122
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

Fares announced for MTR's Southern Link
11 July 2009
China Daily - Hong Kong Edition

HONG KONG: The MTR Corporation's new Southern Link is scheduled to open at a still to be named date during the third quarter. The MTR said on Friday the fare from Tuen Mun to Austin Road in Kowloon's Jordan will be HK$15.8.

"The final tests on operation are now afoot. Once they are completed we will apply to the related government authorities for the official license to open Southern Link, around the third quarter of this year," said Choi Tak-tsun, head of operating of MTR Corporation.

The newly built Austin station is at the junction of Canton Road and Jordan Road, adjacent to the Canton Road Government Offices. The location is the future terminus for the Hong Kong leg of the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link.

The trip from Tuen Mun to Hung Hom will take about half an hour. Traveling time from Yuen Long to Hung Hom will be about 27 minutes. The terminus for East Rail will move forward from Tsim Sha Tsui East to Hung Hom. That will mean East Rail passengers heading for Tsim Sha Tsui East must change at Hung hom.

"The price from Tuen Mun, Yuen Long or Tin Shui Wai to Austin station will be HK$15.8 by octopus, HK$5 from Hung Hom to Austin station, and HK$10.9 from Sheung Shui to Austin.

"In a bid to promote use of the new rail extension, MTR Corporation will introduce a new 'Tuen Mun - Hung Hom Monthly Pass', at the price of HK$470, allowing holders unlimited rides on the line for a month," said Jeny Yeung, general manager of marketing and station commercial of the MTR Corporation.

The existing K16 feeder bus linking East Rail Line and West Rail Line will be phased out of operation within a month after the Southern Link commences operations.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 19th, 2009, 02:06 PM   #123
YannSZ
Shenzhen !
 
YannSZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Shenzhen
Posts: 579
Likes (Received): 217

Pictures - Sunday 19th of July

Here are some pictures taken today.
Those are the constructions going on between YiTian Road and ShenNan Road.
This is for the futur FuTian underground railway station for the HK-GZ Express Railway.

image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr

image hosted on flickr
YannSZ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2009, 04:31 AM   #124
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

Jacobs Receives Contract to Support Hong Kong-China Express Rail Project

PASADENA, Calif., July 7 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (NYSE: JEC) announced today that a subsidiary company received a contract from the Highways Department of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region to provide engineering services for the design and site investigation phase of the US$5 billion Hong Kong section of the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link (XRL).

Jacobs will perform monitoring and verification of work that is executed by MTR Corporation Limited and its associated consultants/agents. Jacobs' Hong Kong office will work directly with the Railway Development Office of the Highways Department, which plans and coordinates the implementation of new rail projects in Hong Kong.

Officials noted that the contract value is US$3 million.

In making the announcement, Jacobs Group Vice President Chris Nagel said, "We greatly appreciate the opportunity to build on our existing relationship with the Highways Department. We are eager to support the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region in its efforts to meet Hong Kong's increasing transportation needs and maintain Hong Kong's position as the southern gateway to China."

The Hong Kong section of the XRL will run in the form of an underground tunnel from a new terminus at West Kowloon to the boundary at Huanggang for connection with China's Mainland section. Construction is anticipated to start by end of 2009 and expected to finish in 2012.

Jacobs, with annual revenues exceeding $12 billion, is one of the world's largest and most diverse providers of technical, professional, and construction services.

Any statements made in this release that are not based on historical fact are forward-looking statements. Although such statements are based on management's current estimates and expectations, and currently available competitive, financial, and economic data, forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain. We, therefore, caution the reader that there are a variety of factors that could cause business conditions and results to differ materially from what is contained in our forward-looking statements. For a description of some of the factors which may occur that could cause actual results to differ from our forward-looking statements please refer to our 2008 Form 10-K, and in particular the discussions contained under Items 1 - Business, 1A - Risk Factors, 3 - Legal Proceedings, and 7 - Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. We also caution the readers of this release that we do not undertake to update any forward-looking statements made herein.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 23rd, 2009, 11:48 PM   #125
UD2
A very cool person
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,318
Likes (Received): 26

^

that black and white picture was great.
__________________
"Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed" - President Eisenhower
UD2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2009, 06:35 PM   #126
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

New rail link cuts no time off trip
25 July 2009
SCMP

A trip on the 50 billion yuan (HK$56.8 billion) high-speed rail link between Hong Kong and Guangzhou will take as long or longer than the existing through train because the new service will terminate 23 kilometres from the provincial capital's centre.

Unlike the present line, which stops in the heart of Guangzhou's business district at Tianhe , the much touted Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong railway due to open in 2015 will terminate southeast of the city centre at Shibi, Panyu .

Travellers arriving there after a 48-minute ride from Hong Kong will find convenient links to the mainland rail network, including a much faster ride to the central city of Wuhan , Beijing or other points north.

But to get to Guangzhou's city centre, passengers will have to transfer to Guangzhou Metro and ride it for 18 stops - a journey of about 45 minutes, the

A Guangzhou Metro spokesman said: "It is a normal metro train. We haven't decided the speed and the frequency of the trains. It will probably be slower than the normal speed in the beginning."

The through train to Guangzhou East station takes an hour and 40 minutes, meaning it will actually take just as long to reach the city centre using the new express, and then the Guangzhou Metro.

One infrastructure expert had doubts about the express link's effectiveness for Hong Kong people.

"[They] will have to transit by travelling at least 45 minutes on the Metro to reach the city centre," said Zheng Tianxiang, a Pearl River Delta transport expert and an adviser to the Guangzhou city government. "The arrangement will be rather troublesome for them."

Hong Kong's section of the new rail line will cost 39 billion yuan and the Shenzhen-to-Guangzhou link 11 billion yuan, the Ministry of Railways said on Friday.

Work on the Shenzhen-to-Guangzhou section has already begun and is expected to be completed before November next year. The Hong Kong government hopes to start building its part of the project by the end of this year.

Announcing the Executive Council's approval of the plan in April last year, the government said the new line "will cut the Hong Kong-Guangzhou travelling time to just under 50 minutes - twice as fast as the Guangzhou-Hong Kong through trains on the East Rail alignment".

The Transport and Housing Bureau has heavily promoted the 48-minute ride to Guangzhou as a time-saving service between the two cities.

"The proposed rail line will provide fast, convenient and reliable services to and from Hong Kong and Guangzhou via Shenzhen," a government spokesman said late last year.

The bureau estimates that in 2016, 88,000 passengers will use the new link to get to Shenzhen and Guangzhou daily, while 11,000 passengers will transit to other Chinese cities through Guangzhou's new station.

Du Wen, head of the team that selected the site for the new station said Shibi was chosen because of its abundant land. Compensation for affected villagers also would be cheaper there than in other places.

Hong Kong Polytechnic University transport specialist Hung Wing-tat said: "Quite a number of Chinese cities are building their new railway stations outside the city centre and this is also an international trend. In many foreign countries, new railway stations are no longer in the city centre because of a shortage of land."

But he said the government should make it clear that the Guangzhou it referred to when promoting the link was not Guangzhou central. "Panyu is part of Guangzhou but it is pretty far away from heart of the city. It is wrong to assume that the express link will take the passengers straight to Guangzhou's business district, like the existing rail line is doing," he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2009, 10:10 AM   #127
gramercy
hvorfor ikke
 
gramercy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,526
Likes (Received): 451

in europe this would be a problem,
but guangzhou will eat that neighbourhood like an amoeba in about 5 years..
__________________
Yume no Chikara ♥ Vorsprung durch Technik
gramercy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2009, 04:54 PM   #128
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

Even Tianhe isn't really Guangzhou's core. It's a new CBD east of the old city.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2009, 08:48 PM   #129
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

Business travellers to stick to old rail line
25 July 2009
SCMP

Travellers with interests in the business heart of Guangzhou are unlikely to switch to the new express line, rail passengers and transport pundits say, but those going to Panyu and nearby Foshan and Nansha will benefit.

Building the terminus in Panyu - 23 kilometres southeast of the business district - would also attract investment there, enabling the satellite district to develop into a new sub-centre of Guangzhou, they say.

"I won't use the new express link for sure," said David So, who travels between his home in West Kowloon and his office in Tianhe every weekend.

It will take 48 minutes to reach Panyu. But travellers then face an 18-stop metro ride into the city centre, which will take about 45 minutes.

"I may be able to save time on the first half of the trip but I will lose time on the second half," Mr Ho said. "Now I only have to travel one stop on the metro to reach my office. In the future, I will have to take 17 stops. And I bet the train ticket will be more expensive than what I'm paying now."

Yusuki Lam, an arts teacher who works in Guangzhou, agreed with him. "I probably will not take the new train. I doubt I can save much time. If it can save time, it will also need to be cheap. I don't want to pay more than what I'm paying now, which is less than HK$190 per journey," she said.

But Michael Ng, a businessman with a company in Guangzhou, said the new link would be good for him.

"Many of the factories where I need to visit before making orders are in Panyu and Nansha," he said. "It will be easier to visit them."

Business specialists on the Pearl River Delta said they expected those who worked and did business in central Guangzhou to keep using the high-speed Guangzhou-Shenzhen train.

"There is a division of labour between different rail lines," said Hung Wing-tat, an associate professor at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, said. "The new one is not for people who want to go to Guangzhou's business district. For those who want to go to the city centre, they can continue to rely on the existing rail lines."

But he said Hongkongers wanting to take advantage of the new line and move to Guangzhou could save a lot by living in Panyu, where property prices were only a fraction of those in central Guangzhou.

Zheng Tianxiang, a professor at Sun Yat-sen University's Centre for Studies of Hong Kong, Macau and the Pearl River Delta in Guangzhou, said the absence of vacant land in central Guangzhou had forced the city government to build the station at Panyu.

But Lin Jiang, director of the university's Hong Kong and Macau research centre, said that if the terminus had been put in the city centre or nearby it would have killed the existing Guangzhou-Shenzhen railway.

"Many parties' interests would have been seriously affected, such as the railway company town that the railway passes through, developers and property owners," he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2009, 08:47 PM   #130
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

Growing, growing, gone
A village of market gardeners might lose their homes, but not the memories

29 July 2009
South China Morning Post

It has been 16 years since Fung Yu-chuk moved out of Choi Yuen Tsuen, the farming village in Shek Kong where she grew up. Even so, she has never lost touch with the land. Admiring beds of crisp water spinach in a former neighbour's yard, Fung doesn't hesitate to wade into the mud, harvesting the best-looking leaves with deft hands.

The 48-year-old returns regularly to Choi Yuen Tsuen (literally Vegetable Garden Village), where she grows a variety of crops such as chilli and peas in her sister's market garden.

"I come back whenever I have time. I have to work in the field," says Fung, a cleaner at a TuenMun school. "It's something I can't live without."

Fung's efforts to retain her farming roots form part of an oral history project launched by heritage activist Chu Hoi-dick to better understand neglected villages and their contribution to agriculture in Hong Kong.

Under government proposals for a controversial HK$39.5 billion express rail link to Guangzhou, Choi Yuen Tsuen and the surrounding market gardens will be razed to make way for a shunting station. Compiled from interviews with 10 villagers aged from 40 to 80 about their struggle as market gardeners, the oral history project features detailed articles as well as videos, some of which can be viewed online (expressrailtruth.com).

Many regard the project as a bid to document a vanishing culture, but Chu, who has formed a Choi Yuen Tsuen support group, says he's not so pessimistic.

"While most people think nothing should get in the way of urban development, we're trying to show through this project that something precious is at stake here."

Choi Yuen Tsuen was largely wilderness when Fung's parents settled there in 1950s. They fled Guangdong after the communist takeover, but found themselves rejected as outsiders in clan-dominated villages in the New Territories. Instead, they made a new life for themselves with other migrants as market gardeners on the land around Choi Yuen Tsuen.

"We built our lives from scratch here," says Ko Chun-heung, who convened the Choi Yuen Tsuen Concern Group to co-ordinate the villagers' campaign.

Like Fung, she was born and raised in the village. "We belong here," she says. "We like the way we live and we're very proud of it. Others might think we have old-fashioned values, but they can't just dismiss it and take it away."

Villagers say they knew nothing about the plan until it was gazetted last November and officials began marking property with paint, but they are fighting to keep their homes. The proposal will require the 500 residents to vacate Choi Yuen Tsuen by next year.

Unlike clan villages, where most residents share the same surname, Choi Yuen Tsuen is made up of disparate families, many of whom were refugees from the civil war on the mainland. However, Ko says the community has long been neglected by the government. Choi Yuen Tsuen doesn't enjoy much of the infrastructure that indigenous villages take for granted, such as a village office and public toilets, and residents have had to maintain facilities themselves. The village only acquired its name and mailbox about 10 years ago through the help of a legislator.

Their proposed eviction further adds to the sense of injustice, Ko says. "We've been here for three generations and we deserve to be valued as a thriving community, just like any indigenous village."

Although Fung moved out of the village after she wed, her jobs in town made her appreciate the country life even more.

"I realised how free it is to be a farmer. I have more control of things and it makes me feel wonderful. When you work for others, it's very stressful and emasculating because no matter how hard you work at your job, praise is rare and you are seldom recognised for your contribution.

"I find it much more rewarding to farm because hard work often pays off, and its value is not measured only with money."

Weekends spent on a vegetable patch may not be enough to sustain Fung's family, but they feed her soul.

"It stimulates my creativity. A lot of thought goes into deciding what to grow and what to cook. I am sure I'd be more dim-witted without my farm," she says with a laugh.

Younger residents such as Lam Ho-cheong, 26, also prefer the simple pleasures of village life to the bustle of the city. "I feel free and happy here. You don't need so much money to get by. I won't starve as long as I have land to grow vegetables," says Lam, a construction worker. "I like the peace and quiet here."

His mother, Lai Kam-lan, 51, has raised Lam and his four siblings by growing vegetables for nearly four decades. "It not only feeds my family, but also gives me freedom because I can be self-sufficient," she says.

But with competition from cheap mainland suppliers and surrounding streams polluted by construction projects, vegetable cultivation is becoming problematic, Lai says.

Yet many in Choi Yuen Tsuen still prefer that to a new life in the urban jungle.

"I'd feel trapped and very sad," says Law Wai-lin, 52. "I love how free and easy it is. I can do a bit of weeding here and there or make dishes with the plants I grow."

The variety of vegetables cultivated in Choi Yuen Tsuen has often surprised volunteers interviewing them for the project.

University student Chan Ping-fung, 21, says: "They can pick up a vegetable somewhere that I haven't seen before and know what to do with it. They do it all the time."

She learned, for instance, about the versatile phoenix eye fruit, which can be used in a soup, to marinate meat or put in rice as a flavour-enhancer.

Chan joined the support group because she felt villagers weren't fairly treated and found herself moved by their determination to keep farming despite the modest returns, and she was charmed by their rustic lifestyle.

Chu hopes scattered rural settlements such as Choi Yuen Tsuen will receive the same treatment as indigenous villages.

"They may not have been around for 100 years, but theirs is a vibrant community compared to many areas in the New Territories where land has been turned into container storage sites and parking lots."

Beside documenting residents' lives, Chu's oral history project provides background information for the guided tours that he has been running every Sunday for the past three months. (The three-hour tour costs HK$40 and details can also be found at expressrailtruth.com.)

Fung often serves as a guide.

"It's great that more people now know we exist," she says. "It's important to get the facts right, so I did a lot of research about our history. I have to be well prepared as you never know what visitors will ask," she says. "I also discovered my talent for public speaking."

Choi Yuen Tsuen was already closely knit, but the project has made residents appreciate each other even more.

"It's been a great experience to get to know our people better," Ko says. "These stories are the best way to show others why this village should not be destroyed."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 4th, 2009, 04:43 AM   #131
mjx729
BANNED
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 111
Likes (Received): 1

that's good news
mjx729 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 6th, 2009, 12:07 PM   #132
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

Rail delay urged over 'ridiculous' green report
3 August 2009
South China Morning Post

The multibillion-dollar railway project that will link Hong Kong to the mainland's high-speed rail network may face delay as the government's environmental advisers will today demand that the MTR Corporation rewrites the route's environmental-impact assessment report.

At least two members of the Advisory Council on the Environment said they would lobby their colleagues at a subcommittee meeting to recommend that the environmental chief not issue a work permit for the project unless the corporation redoes a report on the project's impact on ecology and hydrogeology.

Work on the project is due to start before the end of the year.

Their decision followed the release of a report by Man Si-wai, an environmental academic who formerly taught at Chinese University, who said the report compiled by the corporation was not only biased and inaccurate but did not comply with the requirement of the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance.

"The report admitted the tunnelling work may cause underground water losses and subsidence of the ground above, but they only studied such impact on the project, and not the ecology and farmland around. This is ridiculous," Dr Man said.

She said it was both inaccurate and against the law that the report had not studied the ecological impact along the rail line but only on structures protruding above the surface, as underground water losses would certainly affect life on the ground.

She had contacted some green groups and activists who would be eager to stop the work through a judicial review if the director of environmental protection endorsed the report without conditions.

But a spokeswoman for the Transport and Housing Bureau said the report already covered the hydrogeology and ecological aspect. She said the risk of subsidence was near Tsoi Yuen village, and proposed mitigation measures were in place, but the government would accept any suggestions made by the Advisory Council.

Man Chi-sum, a council member and chief executive of Green Power, said he would not seek to reject the report, but it was only reasonable that the MTR Corp redo the part that it had not finished.

Edwin Lau Che-fung, another council member from Friends of the Earth, added: "They left many blanks in the report, which they should fill in with answers."

The report said most animals and plants identified along the work areas were common species of low ecological value, but Dr Man said in her report that there could still be consequences, as common species could live in a highly concentrated area.

She also challenged the ways the MTR Corp collected the samples.

The government has been criticised by green groups for pushing ahead with the project so quickly that it jump-started the legal process before obtaining a work permit from the Environmental Protection Department.

The local section of the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link, expected to be completed by 2015, would be ready more than four years after the mainland's high-speed rail network, due to be completed by next year. Four green organisations are backing a group of villagers fighting to avoid losing their homes to make way for the link.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2009, 05:47 AM   #133
gogo11
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 3
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Rail delay urged over 'ridiculous' green report
3 August 2009
South China Morning Post

The multibillion-dollar railway project that will link Hong Kong to the mainland's high-speed rail network may face delay as the government's environmental advisers will today demand that the MTR Corporation rewrites the route's environmental-impact assessment report.

At least two members of the Advisory Council on the Environment said they would lobby their colleagues at a subcommittee meeting to recommend that the environmental chief not issue a work permit for the project unless the corporation redoes a report on the project's impact on ecology and hydrogeology.

Work on the project is due to start before the end of the year.

Their decision followed the release of a report by Man Si-wai, an environmental academic who formerly taught at Chinese University, who said the report compiled by the corporation was not only biased and inaccurate but did not comply with the requirement of the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance.

"The report admitted the tunnelling work may cause underground water losses and subsidence of the ground above, but they only studied such impact on the project, and not the ecology and farmland around. This is ridiculous," Dr Man said.

She said it was both inaccurate and against the law that the report had not studied the ecological impact along the rail line but only on structures protruding above the surface, as underground water losses would certainly affect life on the ground.

She had contacted some green groups and activists who would be eager to stop the work through a judicial review if the director of environmental protection endorsed the report without conditions.

But a spokeswoman for the Transport and Housing Bureau said the report already covered the hydrogeology and ecological aspect. She said the risk of subsidence was near Tsoi Yuen village, and proposed mitigation measures were in place, but the government would accept any suggestions made by the Advisory Council.

Man Chi-sum, a council member and chief executive of Green Power, said he would not seek to reject the report, but it was only reasonable that the MTR Corp redo the part that it had not finished.

Edwin Lau Che-fung, another council member from Friends of the Earth, added: "They left many blanks in the report, which they should fill in with answers."

The report said most animals and plants identified along the work areas were common species of low ecological value, but Dr Man said in her report that there could still be consequences, as common species could live in a highly concentrated area.

She also challenged the ways the MTR Corp collected the samples.

The government has been criticised by green groups for pushing ahead with the project so quickly that it jump-started the legal process before obtaining a work permit from the Environmental Protection Department.

The local section of the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link, expected to be completed by 2015, would be ready more than four years after the mainland's high-speed rail network, due to be completed by next year. Four green organisations are backing a group of villagers fighting to avoid losing their homes to make way for the link.
"The report admitted the tunnelling work may cause underground water losses and subsidence of the ground above, but they only studied such impact on the project, and not the ecology and farmland around. This is ridiculous," Dr Man said.

Re. subsidence of the ground above
It is a serious risks for all buildings near the tunnel.
For 60-80 floor tall buildings with subsidence of ground, it make tall buildings fall. It may cause thousand people die.
Month ago, it happaned in Shanghai. There is in TV: Whole building fell.
There is hundred tall buildings near the tunnel in kowloon.
Over 100000 people is at risk of dead with the tunnel.
How come the govet do that ?
gogo11 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2009, 05:54 AM   #134
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

An environmental impact assessment is not supposed to be interpreted as a structural integrity assessment for all buildings along the route.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2009, 06:07 AM   #135
gogo11
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 3
Likes (Received): 0

Re. subsidence of the ground above

Fall of shaghai building month ago:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pktM_...eature=related
gogo11 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2009, 10:14 AM   #136
gogo11
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 3
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by gogo11 View Post
Re. subsidence of the ground above

Fall of shaghai building month ago:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pktM_...eature=related
Sorry. should be:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pktM__i-8IQ
gogo11 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 16th, 2009, 06:35 AM   #137
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

Exco poised to discuss Guangzhou rail route
13 July 2009
SCMP

The Executive Council is expected to discuss plans for an express rail line to Guangzhou in late September after an environmental impact assessment backed the plans.

Government sources said the report - to be released next week for public scrutiny - had found that the rail line would have little impact on conservation land and underground water resources along the route.

The sources said officials hoped to seek funding from the Legislative Council around November if Exco gave its approval.

But green groups have criticised the government for jumping the gun before it has an environmental permit, which will not be issued until the assessment has been scrutinised by the public and the Advisory Council on the Environment.

In addition, about 90 New Territories villagers who must move to make way for a railway depot are still not co-operating.

Under the plans, up to 20 million tonnes of construction waste generated by construction of the line's 26 kilometre tunnel will be recycled.

Twenty per cent of it will be used along the line, 30 per cent will be used on the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge project, and the rest will be shipped to the mainland.

The line, which will allow a rail journey from West Kowloon to Guangzhou via Shenzhen in just 48 minutes, will have soundproofed tracks to ensure the high-speed trains do not disturb activities at the future West Kowloon arts hub.

The government is facing obstacles in calculating compensation for villagers who have to move from Tsoi Yuen Tsuen. Some residents say they will try to block demolition of their homes.

Property ownership in Tsoi Yuen Tsuen is highly complicated, with about a quarter of the villagers living on government land and some suspected of occupying dwellings built illegally.

"The government needs to calculate the amount of compensation for each of the 150 households. It would be very helpful if the villagers can volunteer information," the source said.

Only 60 of the households have so far provided information.

Villagers and activists have proposed other sites for the Tsoi Yuen Tsuen depot, but the sources said they were not feasible since all would require the construction of a long spur line and that would affect more households and conservation land.

The sources said the village must be vacated by November next year.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 19th, 2009, 05:07 PM   #138
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,443
Likes (Received): 5525

The HK$39b question nobody asked
Cross-border station site never challenged

18 August 2009
South China Morning Post

Legislators considering the new cross-border express rail project spent a lot of time over the past nine years poring over funding figures and pondering matters of design, routing and environmental impact.

But not one member asked the crucial question: where would the Guangzhou terminus for the HK$39.5 billion Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong line be?

As deliberations rolled on - and as the government began touting the speedy 48-minute trip the new line would offer its passengers - lawmakers remained ignorant, as some still are, of the fact that a trip of similar length on a commuter line would be needed to reach central Guangzhou.

The question needed to be asked because, as a search of documents and minutes of the Legislative Council's railways subcommittee shows, the government was not telling them clearly either. While the Guangdong authorities decided in 2004 that the line would end at Shibi in Panyu , 23 kilometres and an estimated 45-minute metro ride from northern Tianhe in the central business district, where the present through train terminates, this information did not appear in a Legco paper until 2005.

Even then the Hong Kong government did not say - and no one asked - how the passengers, having made the much-vaunted 48-minute ride from West Kowloon, would get to the city centre or how long it would take.

The word Shibi was simply stated in Legco documents and the terminus shown on a map with no information about connections to the city centre. In fact, taking into account transfer time and the 18-stop metro ride, the journey will take at least as long as the present 100 minutes.

No legislator even asked where Shibi was. One, Albert Chan Wai-yip, spotted its location on a map in 2006, but he did not question it. Meanwhile, it has emerged that, even before the site was officially chosen, the Guangdong government was weighing up the merits of four alternatives - three of them in Panyu and one in Haizhu district - giving a clear signal to anyone alert enough to spot it that the station was going to be a long way from the city centre.

Some of the lawmakers sitting on the Legco subcommittee still do not know where the Guangzhou terminus is. "No, the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong express rail link does not head to Panyu. It goes to Guangzhou," unionist lawmaker Li Fung-ying said. When it was pointed out to her that Shibi is in Panyu, she said: "Then I need to follow this up in the next meeting."

Democratic Party transport spokesman Andrew Cheng Kar-foo, a member of the subcommittee since 2000, said he did not know it would take about the same time to travel to Guangzhou city centre with the new link as on the existing railway.

"I just heard this from you for the first time. We have not studied it in detail in the past," he told a South China Morning Post reporter.

Engineering sector legislator Raymond Ho Chung-tai said it was not important where the Guangzhou terminus was located since the link would be part of the national express-rail system. "We should not just narrowly look at how long it takes to travel to Guangzhou," he said.

Subcommittee chairwoman Miriam Lau Kin-yee, the transport sector legislator, said lawmakers had not questioned the location of the Guangzhou terminus because it was outside the legislature's scope.

As it turns out, the convenience of Hong Kong passengers was far from the minds of Guangdong officials planning the new line. "The four [alternative sites] were chosen because the new station is not solely for Guangzhou. It is also built to serve Foshan ," a mainland engineer involved in the project since the early 2000s said.

The terminus was shown on maps attached to some documents shown to legislators, but no mention was made of its distance from the city centre, although there were references to its being "at the heart of the Guangzhou and Foshan metropolitan zone". In fact, when the Hong Kong line was first mentioned in a government railway development strategy report in 2000, it was conceived as an express route to the border - an alternative to the then Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation's multi-stop commuter line.

A government spokesman said Hong Kong had agreed on the location in March 2005.

But legislators were briefed on the route only in December 2005, when they were provided with a map showing Shibi's location. The map showed the terminus would be some distance from Guangzhou's centre, but not exactly how far away nor what the transit arrangements would be. And no one asked.

An international tender to design and build the station was issued by mainland authorities in May 2004. It stated clearly that it would be in Shibi, Panyu, and would serve the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong express link. This was almost a year before Legco was informed of the terminus' location.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2009, 03:07 AM   #139
YannSZ
Shenzhen !
 
YannSZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Shenzhen
Posts: 579
Likes (Received): 217


I am very curious to know the real reasons behind the choice of this location for the Guangzhou train station. That seems ridiculous.
This might be the decision of greedy officials who, prior to chose the location, had carefully bought some land in Panyu...
You cannot decide the location of a xxx billion $ project without a huge study justifying the choice.
YannSZ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2009, 03:25 AM   #140
urbanfan89
Registered User
 
urbanfan89's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,490
Likes (Received): 32

Perhaps in the far future a tunnel could be built connecting the existing KCR line at Buji District (which is upgraded to 250 km/h) with the high speed rail tunnel at Huanggang, so that trains from West Kowloon can run on the existing line to Guangzhou East Station.

But it's another multi-billion dollar (or Yuan) mistake.
urbanfan89 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu