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Old December 29th, 2012, 06:49 PM   #61
ChrisZwolle
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The second deck of the Freeway 1 (Taipei - Zhongli) will be completed in February 2013. A part is already open to traffic.





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Old December 29th, 2012, 09:36 PM   #62
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Old December 30th, 2012, 07:39 PM   #63
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Holy cow! That looks like Suburbanist's heaven. Why is it all elevated?
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Old December 30th, 2012, 07:41 PM   #64
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I don't know for sure. Both the elevated structure and the mainline expressway are tolled. And it doesn't save much - if any - space compared to a conventional widening. The viaducts are 40 kilometers long.
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Old December 30th, 2012, 09:16 PM   #65
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Yeah, when I was living in Taipei, I always wondered why the heck did they decide to build an elevated expressway. As Chris pointed out, this doesn't really save any space at all.
But could it be less noisy for housholds along the route?
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Old January 9th, 2013, 12:36 AM   #66
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Airport to Taipei city, TAIWAN
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Old January 9th, 2013, 12:39 AM   #67
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Jianguo Expressway

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建國高架橋|Jianguo Expressway by Otori Jin, on Flickr
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Old January 10th, 2013, 02:28 PM   #68
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Here's another view of the elevated structure along Highway 1 south of Taipei.

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HIGHWAY NO.1 - TAIWAN by mambo1935, on Flickr
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Old March 20th, 2013, 05:00 AM   #69
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Wed, Mar 20, 2013
Center develops earthquake sensors for use on bridges
Taipei Times

The National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering yesterday announced that it has developed the nation’s first real-time fiber monitoring system capable of sending out a warning if it detects abnormal geological behavior around bridges.

There are more than 28,000 bridges across the nation and millions of people use them each day. This results in a high rate of deadly accidents on bridges that have been damaged by natural disasters, the center said, citing the 921 Earthquake in 2000, which destroyed more than 100 bridges in central Taiwan, and the collapse of the Shuangyuan Bridge (雙園大橋) in Greater Kaohsiung during Typhoon Morakot in 2009.

Lee Cheng-kuang (李政寬), an associate researcher at the center, said that people patroling bridges during natural disasters is difficult and unsafe, but is the primary monitoring method. Some of the country’s newer bridges are equipped with electronic monitoring devices, but they only have partial coverage because they are very costly to install and maintain.

The center’s new monitoring system is capable of sending data about a bridge’s stability through a computer network, allowing administrators to be updated in real time and enabling them to direct traffic signals to warn pedestrians and drivers of any danger.

“The best feature of the new system is that between 30 and 40 sensors can be installed on one fiber cable, meaning that the system can stretch over almost an entire bridge and so monitor every dilatation joint,” he said, adding that the system is highly accurate and less expensive to maintain.

The mechanism is also highly versatile and can be applied on different types of bridges or overhead roads.

For example, the Dazhi Bridge in Taipei would require just six fiber cables to monitor its 43 critical points, the center said, adding that the system is now being tested on the Dazhi Bridge and may be also be installed on the high-speed railway and MRT lines.
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Old March 20th, 2013, 06:21 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebasepoiss View Post
Why is it all elevated?
Actually it goes to ground level at Chungli. This extension was mostly meant to provide fast track connection between Taipei and Taoyuan airport (they have deliberate high occupancy vehicle line on it for that purpose too) and also shorten the commuting time for people traveling further south. There are many intersections on the north portion of highway No. 1 and during rush hours the main traffic slows down to a standstill on most of them. There are much less intersections on the newly built extension (actually only at highway No. 2 and Chungli), building it almost entirely elevated might have been the less complex way to bypass all existing intersections in between.
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Old March 20th, 2013, 11:11 AM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The second deck of the Freeway 1 (Taipei - Zhongli) will be completed in February 2013. A part is already open to traffic.





I was there in May 2012 and was wondering whether it was an elevated road or railway they were building. It's unbelievably high up close; unnecessarily so I thought and visually very intrusive.

Has there been any mention in this thread yet of the landslip problems on Taiwan's mountain roads? I remember seeing them in a number of places in the mountains including a huge one near Beidong YuShan. When these occur, whole hillsides give way and take any road in the way with them. Taiwan ends up spending a lot of money just clearing and repairing the damage.
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Old April 17th, 2013, 04:30 PM   #72
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Taiwanese media report the remaining stretch of elevated lanes along Freeway 1 will open on April 20.

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五楊高架 by dunhill_felling, on Flickr

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Untitled by aisiterucat, on Flickr
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Old April 17th, 2013, 04:49 PM   #73
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Google also pushed out some recent imagery of the area of the elevated lanes.

This imagery shows the viaducts briefly touch down at ground level to let traffic merge. This is located near Zhongli and provide a break of 2 kilometers in the elevated structure.

On the other hand, the viaducts do not start at Wugu, but actually appear to be merging with the older viaducts above Freeway 1 in Taipei, which would bring the total length of the viaducts to 35 and 12 kilometers. However, Taipei itself has no recent imagery to confirm this, but it's confirmed the viaducts do extend further east than the Wugu toll plaza.

Some explanatory imagery:

1. Proof that the elevated lanes do extend east of the Wugu toll plaza (center).


2. The elevated lanes briefly touch down here at Zhongli.


3. They begin again about 2 kilometers south.
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Old April 21st, 2013, 04:32 PM   #74
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Very cool sight.

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2013.04.21 台北 / 五楊高架 by MaxChu, on Flickr
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Old April 23rd, 2013, 06:26 AM   #75
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The elevated highway is supposed to be an extension to relieve congestion, especially between Taoyuan airport and Taipei.
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Old April 23rd, 2013, 02:02 PM   #76
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Do the elevated highways (or 'skyway') have higher toll compared to ground level road?
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Old April 24th, 2013, 02:01 AM   #77
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As far as I know there isn't any toll plaza along the elevated part. If you go from the South you'll just have to pay at the Yangmei toll plaza just as you would if you decided to take the old route.

I might be wrong though
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Old April 24th, 2013, 05:52 AM   #78
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That is correct, both Taishan and Yangmei tall stations are at ground level and serve the entry/exit points of the elevated sections of the highway.

By the way the traffic during rush hours improved significantly since its entry into service last weekend.
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Old April 24th, 2013, 06:09 PM   #79
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Ah okay

But how will the construction costs of those elevated expressways be recovered then?

What incentive is there to use the elevated expressway over the one that is at ground level?

Are there any pros and cons between either driving on ground level versus driving on the elevated expressway? (and vice-versa)?
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Old April 25th, 2013, 04:47 AM   #80
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There are only two interchanges for the elevated section between these two tall stations, one at highway no. 2 and one at Chungli. All people who travel between Taipei and Yangmei (or further south) will be better off if they drive on the elevated road because they will, in such case, avoid the congested traffic that forms around the interchanges at Linko, Nankan, Taoyuan (highway No. 2), Neili, Chungli and Pingzhen.
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