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Old January 10th, 2008, 11:13 PM   #41
xXFallenXx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidearl View Post
Where does Las Vegas and Phoenix get most of their water from?? I just don't understand how we can sustain those 2 cities into the future... seems so wasteful
The Colorado River.
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Old January 10th, 2008, 11:37 PM   #42
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what other major cities??

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The Colorado River.
Does this river provide water supply for any other major cities besides Phoenix and Vegas???
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Old January 10th, 2008, 11:38 PM   #43
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a lot of So Cal.
Other than that I don't know.
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Old January 10th, 2008, 11:49 PM   #44
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socal should stop using colorado river and start using desalination.
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Old January 10th, 2008, 11:54 PM   #45
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i agree 100%
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Old January 10th, 2008, 11:55 PM   #46
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that wont happen till the river runs dry, sadly...
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Old January 10th, 2008, 11:56 PM   #47
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ya i don't think it would cost anymore money tahn they already spend. other places do it for liek US$.50/cubic meter. energy consumption would go up a bit but so wat.

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that wont happen till the river runs dry, sadly...

by that time vegas and pheonix will be ghost towns. :-/
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Old January 11th, 2008, 06:50 PM   #48
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Plenty of water(abit too much along with floods) in Malaysia, but it was several years ago that Malaysia faced severe drought,that a whole reservoir dried up and reveled an old grave at its bottom and a resort went bankrupt.Meanwhile, our condo swimming pool dried up as the condo managment could not refill the water while water supply was cut the whole day and reconnected at night.

With the weather going unpredictable these days ,we may face the same situation again.
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Old January 17th, 2008, 06:04 AM   #49
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FEATURE-Shrinking lake highlights Bali's water woes

BUYAN, Indonesia, Dec 11 (Reuters) - Every year since 2000, the water level of Bali's Lake Buyan has been falling, leaving many locals puzzled.

Some believe deforestation in the surrounding mountains is to blame, while green groups suspect the shrinking lake is emblematic of looming water shortages the Indonesian island is likely to face as more and more tourists visit.

"I don't know why but it looks like the trees have been cut down," said vegetable farmer Nyoman Suarjaya, standing near an embankment now several hundred metres from the lake's edge.

"So there's no water catchment," he added.

He pointed to a pavilion built a few years ago for tourists to launch canoes onto the lake. It now lies abandoned near an expansive stretch of land that once used to be the lake bed and now has become fields for vegetable growers.

Lake Buyan, one of Bali's deepest, no longer draws tourists, just locals curious to see the receding lake which has faced a 3.5 metres (11 feet) drop in water levels since 2000.

In the densely populated south of Bali, tourism and the construction industry are fuelling a boom in the island's economy, which serves as a regional business hub.

About two-thirds of Bali's 3.5 million people live in the main city Denpasar and further south to the tourist areas of Seminyak, Legian, Kuta and Nusa Dua, where environment ministers are meeting this week to try to agree on the outlines of a broader pact to fight global warming.

Tourism has rebounded this year after a series of bomb blasts. The recent construction boom involving factories, malls, luxury villas, spas and high-end resorts has led to ever-greater demands for water, electricity and waste management.

But some parts of the island, named in a recent Travel + Leisure magazine poll as the world's best, are already facing water shortages or salt-water intrusion into wells.

Environmentalists and some government officials say the problems could become worse unless significant investment is made and people started conserving water.

"If there's no change in this fast-growing tourism development, it's not impossible that Bali will suffer from a water crisis in the next 10 years," said Agung Wardana from Wahli, a leading Indonesian environment group.

"The current emphasis is the development of the tourism industry which results in changes in productive and open lands that reduce the ability to provide ground water. This is made worse by neglect of river system," he added.

ALL IS NOT WELL

Many Balinese rely on wells for water but in some areas, particularly in the tourist centre of Kuta, so much is being extracted that salt water is fouling supplies. Rubbish and sewage being dumped into rivers was also affecting water quality.

Bali has few reservoirs and many of its rivers are used to channel water to an intricate traditional network of channels to feed the island's iconic emerald rice fields.

"Since the development of tourism industry is very fast, in the future we will have a big problem," said Ida Cakra Sudarsana, head of the mining and energy division in the Bali Department of Public Works.

He said Bali's problems were not lack of ground or river water but one of development and he urged an expansion of reservoirs and tree-planting schemes in Bali's volcanic mountains to curb deforestation and water-conservation schemes.

"We're supposed not to face a water shortage until at least 2025," said Raka Dalem, a senior lecturer in environmental management and ecotourism at Bali's Udayana University.

"But in actual situation we do face a shortage situation because of bad management of water resources.

"During the wet season, lots of water flows to the sea and then in the dry season we face a bad problem. That's the main issue, how we manage the water so that it can be used throughout the year," he said.

While tourist businesses and farmers diverting water from Bali's lakes were partly to blame, there was also significant damage caused by the felling of forest trees near catchment areas for cash crop cultivation, experts said.

A lack of trees meant water and silt rushed into the lakes during downpours but there were less regular river flows during the dry season. It also meant that water was not being absorbed into the ground to fill underground basins that will provide for Bali's water needs in the future.

Water conservation is crucial.

Already at Nusa Dua, an enclave of five-star hotels and a major conference centre, the government has banned deep-well water. All big hotels in Nusa Dua used recycled waste water for watering gardens.

Many luxury villas also used water-recycling systems, said Nils Wetterlind of ecovilla developer Tropical Homes.

But most villas also have large swimming pools filled from well or town water. And very few villas used solar/natural gas electricity systems now widely available or used certified plantation timber, meaning they weren't very green.
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Old January 17th, 2008, 06:20 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xXFallenXx View Post
that wont happen till the river runs dry, sadly...
The river doesn't normally go all the way to the Pacific Ocean unless it's been very rainy. It hasn't for years now.

Also, the US government built massive reservoirs out west around 75 years ago to give the locals jobs at the time, create power, control flooding and reserve bodies of water. There ARE massive bodies of water out there, but the government is not going to drain their supplies. The states need to find ways to use the water that falls each year without grabbing into the built up supplies in the reservoirs, which are already running lower than normal.

I think Phoenix actually has massive underground water sources and that's why it doesn't have restrictions or worry about water concidering it's in the desert.

Last edited by Chicagoago; January 17th, 2008 at 06:26 AM.
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Old January 23rd, 2008, 09:41 AM   #51
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Malaysian capital faces water shortage: report

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 18, 2008 (AFP) - Malaysia's capital faces a major water shortage in the next few days after a burst pipe disrupted supplies to a treatment plant, a report said Friday.

The Star daily said that the entire city centre would be affected by the damaged 1.2m (four feet) pipe which supplies raw water from a dam to a downtown water treatment plant.

Water authorities said the plant would not be able to meet the daily consumption of 136 million litres by 350,000 consumers in the city and that about a third of them were expected to experience shortages.

"We can expect some parts of the city centre to be affected until we are able to repair the damage," the official said, according to The Star.

Water was being diverted to the treatment plant from other sources, and to meet the expected shortfall, tanker lorries were on standby to transport water to affected areas, it said.

The Star said the pipe burst with a bang near a housing development in suburban Kuala Lumpur, causing panic among residents who then rushed to move cars and motorcycles as the water flooded their compound.
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Old January 23rd, 2008, 07:02 PM   #52
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Plummeting temperature freezes drinking water supply, affecting 100,000 in central China

WUHAN, Jan. 19 (Xinhua) -- More than 100,000 people are enduring a drinking water shortage in central China's Hubei Province since Thursday when the plunging temperature froze supply.

The low temperature, along with continuous heavy snowfall, burst water pipes and frozen hydrometers in Wuhan, the Hubei capital.

About 2,000 citizens have contact a water-supply hotline for help, a record high in recent years, according to the Wuhan Water Bureau.

"The water supply here has been cut off for four days since the water tank in our building froze. We have had to fetch water from downstairs ever since," said a local resident.

"I have not seen such a low temperature in Wuhan for more than 10 years," he added.

To ensure supply, the Wuhan Water Bureau deployed nearly 4,000 vehicles and 15,200 workers to repair broken pipes and hydrometers.

Heavy snow also closed five expressways in Hubei on Saturday, further burdening the Wuhan railway terminal amid the current Spring Festival travel peak that started yesterday.

Passenger flow at the Hankou Railway Station on Saturday had doubled compared to the same time a year earlier, reaching a record high of 47,000.

Heavy snow was also reported throughout the country.

In the northwestern Gansu Province, the local meteorological observatory issued a red warning, the highest alert, to remind drivers and pedestrians of the icy road conditions.

In the eastern Jiangsu Province, meteorological authorities in Nanjing forecast the snow, which began in the morning, would last for two days.

The eastern Anhui and northwestern Shaanxi provinces also reported heavy snow and a cold front.
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Old April 14th, 2008, 11:23 PM   #53
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I dont no much about the US but why doesnt lad vegas use the Hover damn? whats it for anyway? there seems to be so much water in it.
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Old June 18th, 2008, 09:05 AM   #54
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Splash of activities during S'pore Int'l Water Week

18 June 08

TODAY, 3.2 billion of the world's population lives in cities. By 2030, the figure will be five billion. This means three out of five people will be city dwellers in 22 years.
This is not good news, especially in Asia, where already 700 million people have no access to clean drinking water, and 1.5 billion, no to basic sanitation.

It is why more than 6,000 government officials, scientists, industry experts and businessmen from across the world will be meeting here next week to explore ways to make cities more liveable, at a time when population growth and economic progress are putting pressure on the world?s resources.

They will attend two inaugural events - the Singapore International Water Week and the World Cities Summit - which are being held for the first time and Singapore is organising both.

The theme for the water event, organised by the national water agency PUB, is 'Sustainable Water Solutions for Cities'.

The cities summit, organised by the Ministry of National Development, the Civil Service College and the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, will be along the theme 'Liveable and Vibrant Cities'.

Under the wings of these two big events are more than 20 international high-level meetings and workshops, including a conference with a special focus on East Asia.

Although most of the event's sessions will involve government officials, businessmen, scientists and industry experts, some activities will be tailored for students and the public.

Policymakers will largely be involved in meetings to discuss challenges of growing urban populations. Among the public events planned are forums and a concert at the Esplanade Concert Hall, where water is the guest star.

There will also be sports demonstrations and activities at Bedok Reservoir and Marina Bay, and a science exhibition at the Science Centre Singapore.

A concert featuring the composer of the Oscar-winning score of the Chinese film Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, will be held at the Esplanade Concert Hall.

Bedok Reservoir will come alive for the three nights from June 20 to 22 before the start of the water conference week with an energetic performance by Dutch theatre troupe The Lunatics.

The name of their performance is Hydro Sapiens, a play on the scientific term for human beings, homo sapien.

The Marina Bay area will also be turned into a field for canoe polo matches and a stage for water ski performances.

And the Science Centre Singapore is holding an exhibition on water and how it shapes ecosystems around the world.


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Old June 18th, 2008, 09:26 AM   #55
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City Views Sydney
Rain-drenched city fumes over costly desalination plant

1 May 2008
South China Morning Post

It is little wonder that Sydneysiders are feeling geographically challenged at the moment. After enduring a summer of water restrictions and grim warnings about global warming, they have just lived through the wettest April in 70 years.

Even harder to digest is the news that with the city's inland dams gradually reaching capacity, householders will soon be hit with a special levy to fund the state government's A$1.9 billion (HK$13.8 billion) desalination plant.

"I could barely read the letters criticising the expensive desalination plant because my copy of The Daily Telegraph [a Sydney tabloid] was so wet from all the rain," wrote one disgruntled newspaper reader. "Build a bloody dam."

The controversial project, which is being built in the seaside suburb of Kurnell, has already been labelled a white elephant by environmentalists - and is now attracting flak from local residents who claim that the pipeline is damaging their houses.

Ros Long, who has lived in Kurnell for 20 years, says test drilling for the pipeline that will carry water from the plant to central Sydney is beginning to crack her walls. "We felt like we were in an earthquake," she said. "My house was jumping up and down. I've worked all my life to get this house."

Other homeowners have reported bulging brick walls, subsidence and other problems since work on the pipeline began. They are outraged that the pipe is being laid through their suburb rather than beneath Sydney Airport- whose owners, Macquarie Bank, successfully repelled the giant underground pipeline.

James Stewart, another local, claims the construction work has already begun to pollute the waters of Botany Bay, the birthplace of modern Australia.

"It breaks my heart," he says. "I've grown up here all my life. This is where Captain Cook landed and they're trashing it. Kurnell has put up with a lot over the years, but this is the final nail in the coffin."

The heavy autumn rains couldn't have come at a worse time for the NSW premier, Morris Iemma, who is already struggling to defend his government's poor record on hospitals, schools and public transport.

Critics say that the desalination plant will use up to A$70 million worth of electricity each year and - since most of the city's power is from coal-powered generators - substantially expand Sydney's environmental footprint.

Opposition MPs argue that Sydney's water crisis could easily be avoided by fixing leaking supply pipes and recycling; at present 98 per cent of the city's used water is pumped into the ocean.

"Sydneysiders would rightly be scratching their heads and saying 'what has happened to all this precious rain, why isn't it being harvested and why aren't we pursuing lower-cost options'?" said Andrew Stoner, shadow minister for water utilities.

Environmental campaigners, meanwhile, say that apart from the huge cost of building the plant and its negative impact on Botany Bay, desalination is an unimaginative solution to Sydney's water shortage. "There are a large number of water savings and recycling projects that will be killed off by running the desalination plant," says Greens MP John Kaye. "It is the worst outcome of any for Sydney's environment."

Several other states - including Western Australia and South Australia - are also pursuing the desalination option. Unlike them, however, Sydney does not have a dry, Mediterranean climate, but a sub-tropical one. Indeed, Sydney receives twice as much rain as London - although Londoners endure more rainy days - and to date no one has suggested building a desalination plant on the English Channel.

Environmentalists are urging the government to abandon the Kurnell plant and adopt a far simpler solution: subsidise householders to install rainwater tanks.

"Even in drought, Sydney has a higher annual rainfall than the rainy cities of London or Melbourne", says Cate Faehrmann, director of the Nature Conservation Council.

"A mass rollout of rainwater tanks would allow Sydney householders to collect water when we have those drenching Sydney rains, and use the water when times are dry." But the government will not be swayed. It says the Kurnell plant will open, on schedule, in 2011.
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Old June 18th, 2008, 10:12 AM   #56
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This is ridiculous. Sydney does not need a desalination plant. They have on average over 1200mm of rain per annum. That is double as much as in most german cities. Just build another dam and restrict wasteful water usage.
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Old June 19th, 2008, 06:31 AM   #57
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http://www.cglg.org/projects/water/C...ementation.asp
http://www.glc.org/

Looks like no water will be leaving the Great Lakes to aid in any of the water crises in the US and Canada or even the world.
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Old July 24th, 2008, 03:38 AM   #58
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Water sector corruption threatens lives -report

BERLIN, June 25 (Reuters) - Corruption has made the cost of water more expensive in some developing countries than in cities like New York, London or Rome, threatening billions of lives, watchdog Transparency International said on Wednesday.

The Berlin-based non-governmental organisation found in its latest global corruption report that bribes, graft and other forms of wrongdoing are the main reasons for a "global water crisis" that is speeding the pace of environmental degradation.

The report, released in Berlin and New York on Wednesday, said water sector corruption ranges from petty bribery in water delivery to the looting of irrigation and hydropower funding.

Such corruption -- seen in rich countries as well as poor -- threatens to exacerbate a global food shortage.

"Corruption in the water sector puts the lives and livelihoods of billions of people at risk," the TI report said. "The onset of climate change and the increasing stress on water supply around the world make the fight against corruption in water more urgent than ever."

Huguette Labelle, chair of TI, said it was essential to overcome corruption in the sector.

"Massive new investments in irrigation have been announced worldwide to help counter the food crisis, yet water shortage means food shortage and if corruption in irrigation is not also addressed these efforts will fall short," Labelle said.

Calling its report the first to study the impact of water sector corruption, TI said 1.2 billion people have no guaranteed access to water and 2.6 billion are without proper sanitation.

Irrigated lands help produce 40 percent of the world's food supply but corruption in irrigation is rampant, TI said.

The report said in India corruption adds about 25 percent to irrigation contracts. Elsewhere, graft can increase the cost of connecting households to water networks by up to 30 percent.

"Corruption in drinking water and sanitation emerges at every point along the water delivery chain," it said.

"It drains investment from the sector, increases prices and decreases water supplies. One result is that poor households in Jakarta, Lima, Nairobi or Manila spend more on water than residents of New York, London or Rome."

The report said industrialised nations were not immune to corruption, with bid-rigging and price-fixing seen in water infrastructure projects in Europe and the United States.

"Corruption in the water sector is widespread and makes water undrinkable, inaccessible and unaffordable," TI wrote.

"It is evident in the drilling of rural wells in sub-Saharan Africa, the construction of water treatment facilities in Asia's urban areas, the building of hydroelectric dams in Latin America and the daily misuse of water resources around the world."
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Old July 24th, 2008, 04:08 AM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foadi View Post
socal should stop using colorado river and start using desalination.
THat is WAY too expensive and the local environmental effects are too severe. Desalinization is an incredibly energy intensive process.
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Old July 24th, 2008, 04:16 AM   #60
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Quote:
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I dont no much about the US but why doesnt lad vegas use the Hover damn? whats it for anyway? there seems to be so much water in it.
Errr........Hoover Dam is on the Colorado River and created Lake Mead, which is the source of water for Las Vegas. Hoover Dam also supplies Las Vegas with its electrical power.
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