daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation

Airports and Aviation » Airports | Photos and Videos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 11th, 2008, 05:37 AM   #61
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

NJ's Newark Airport's flights per hour capped at 83 in DOT's effort to ease delays
10 March 2008

WASHINGTON (AP) - The federal government is reducing by 13 percent peak-hours flights out of New Jersey's Newark Liberty Airport to blunt New York City-area airline delays that routinely spread nationwide.

Newark will be limited to 83 flights per hour during peak periods starting in early May, Department of Transportation Secretary Mary Peters said Monday. The airport handled about 95 flights per hour during last summer's peak.

The 83-flight cap is the same one that starts Saturday at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, where about 100 flights per hour were scheduled last summer. Similar flight caps, which are intended to alleviate record-high delays, already exist at New York's LaGuardia Airport.

The caps will be in place at Newark and JFK for two years, while LaGuardia's will remain unless the government replaces it with a new rule, a Transportation Department spokesman said.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs all three airports, knew caps were coming to Newark. Peters announced the move late last year, but the government had not released the specific number until Monday.

JFK, LaGuardia and Newark last year had the nation's lowest on-time arrival rates; aviation officials say delays there cascade throughout the system.

The flight caps are designed to result in fewer scheduled flights during delay-vulnerable peak hours, and to create more options during the middle of the day, Peters said. The Newark caps should create about 30 more flights daily spread throughout the day and as capacity grows, the department will auction those slots, she added.

A Port Authority spokesman disagreed and said a recent reduction in late flights due to better weather and a heightened focus on the problem "demonstrate (that) delays can be reduced without limiting flights through caps and raising ticket prices through auctions."

A spokesman for Continental Airlines, which operates a hub at Newark, said the carrier had not yet seen the Federal Aviation Administration's order, although an 83-flight cap "would require us to adjust some of our schedules, but we would be committed to making it work."

The nation's largest airlines and the Port Authority prefer flight-path changes and improvements aimed at increasing flight capacity at airports.

"In the meantime, limiting flights can help to match airline schedules with capacity," Continental spokesman Dave Messing wrote in an e-mail.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 11th, 2008, 07:54 AM   #62
world1
YAAY! IM 17!
 
world1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: bangalore
Posts: 367
Likes (Received): 2

is this thread only for american delays??? means only in america or something?
__________________
A government big enough to give you everything you want is big enough to take everything you have!!
world1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2008, 09:16 AM   #63
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

^ No. I did have an article on Europe a page back.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2008, 12:26 PM   #64
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

U.S. Plans Steps to Ease Congestion At Airports
17 May 2008
The New York Times

WASHINGTON -- To hold down ticket prices and ease airplane congestion over the New York region, the Bush administration proposed Friday to auction landing slots at two major airports, Kennedy and Newark, and to impose a limit on airline traffic at Newark.

Together the changes are meant to untangle the metropolitan skies and to make it easier for new airlines to gain access to the lucrative New York market, a step the administration expects will help keep fares down.

Eventually, the administration hopes, the changes will help smooth air traffic throughout the country. A third of the nation's air traffic passes through the New York region, and three-fourths of the chronic delays around the country can be traced to delays in New York, according to the federal aviation officials.

The latest moves come on top of previous proposals for major changes at the airports serving New York, suggesting that in the late stages of its term, the Bush administration is trying to address problems that have grown worse on its watch.

Last month, the Transportation Department proposed to auction slots at La Guardia, the third major New York airport. The cap on flights in and out of Newark Liberty International means the government has now limited flights at all three major airports.

Auctions have never been held for airport slots in the United States or other major airports around the world. Because of stiff opposition from airlines and influential lawmakers, it was not clear whether such auctions could actually be conducted before the Bush administration ends.

The auctions are a necessary complement to the caps, administration officials say. The caps are meant to prevent airlines from crowding flights at peak hours when most passengers want to fly and to force them to spread flights out around the clock.

Such caps run counter to the pro-competition leanings of the Bush administration, but officials say they regard the auctions for takeoff and landing slots as an appropriate ''market mechanism.''

By both capping flights and auctioning slots, the thinking goes, carriers that now dominate the three airports will not be able to use that dominance to raise ticket prices. Allowing the existing carriers to remain without new competition would be ''a formula for failure,'' said D. J. Gribbin, the general counsel of the Transportation Department.

Mr. Gribbin said in a briefing with reporters that the government had to have a system to allow ''the next Virgin America, the next JetBlue, or whoever, to get access to some of the most valuable airspace in the world.''

The department proposed different auction systems, but they would all take slots away from big carriers and make them available to others.

For Newark, it said, each airline would get to keep up to 20 slots a day, but 10 percent of the remainder would be auctioned over 10 years. Any airline, including the one whose slots were being offered for redistribution, could bid. At Newark, this would mean auctioning 96 slots over 10 years, out of a total of 1,219.

For Kennedy International, the government proposed the same auction system as for Newark but it also offered a more aggressive alternative under which each airline would keep up to 20 slots while auctioning 20 percent of the remainder over five years. The incumbent airline would not be allowed to bid under this alternative.

The different proposals arise from the oddities of market share. Continental Airlines will have 72 percent of the departures from Newark in August, based on schedules that the Air Transport Association has compiled. All other carriers at Newark have a market share in the single digits. Thus, forbidding Continental to bid on slots it gave up would not be fair, transportation officials said.

At La Guardia, US Airways will have a 32 percent market share, American 22 percent and Delta nearly 20 percent. At Kennedy, Delta has 31 percent of the planned departures, JetBlue 27 percent and American, 15 percent.

Auctions are often used to distribute scarce public resources like broadcast spectrum, but they are not as well accepted as they are in the Bush administration and among some conservative academics.

The airlines plan to argue that they won the slots and that an auction would be an unlawful ''taking.'' They also plan to argue that auctions would be a tax on airline operations, and that only Congress can impose such a tax.

''Implementing an untested scheme to impose auctions at the busiest airports in America is nothing short of insanity,'' said Senator Charles E. Schumer, Democrat of New York, in a statement. ''Auctions have never been tried and were hatched by a handful of ivory tower types in the administration. It shows that this administration puts ideology above the safety and economic well-being of the American flier.''

In some markets, airlines that hold slots can sell them to others, according to Douglas E. Lavin, vice president for North America of the International Air Transport Association. ''That's how carriers like Delta and Continental are getting into Heathrow,'' in London, he said. But, he added, ''As far as I know, there's no government organization that takes slots and auctions them off.'' Mr. Lavin formerly served as the assistant administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and the incumbent airlines say they will oppose the auction idea. The Air Transport Association, the trade group of the big carriers, said the Transportation Department had a ''continued fixation'' on auctions. The F.A.A. should focus on steps that will increase capacity, said James C. May, the group's president and chief executive. ''This experiment will penalize the public,'' he added, because airlines will pass on costs to passengers.

The airlines say that they have spent many years and millions of dollars building market share and physical facilities at the airports, and that the slots should not be taken away from them. The Transportation Department, however, insists that the F.A.A. owns the slots.

The Port Authority said the auction proposal was poorly conceived. ''The Port Authority will work with the airlines to examine our options for prohibiting the federal government from implementing this auction plan,'' the agency said.

The department's goal is to hold the auction this year or at ''the very beginning'' of next year. Mr. Bush leaves office on Jan. 20.

The department also said on Friday that an airline that charges extra for a second piece of checked luggage would have to disclose that charge before it sold a ticket.

The department said it would close a loophole that makes airline on-time statistics look better than they really are. At present, planes that leave the gate on time but then sit on the tarmac for hours and return to the gate are not counted as delayed.

The department also said it would give the Port Authority $2 million to study how to extend train service to Stewart Airport, in Newburgh, 90 miles north of Manhattan. ''Ultimately, this will help make Stewart New York's fourth major airport,'' Mr. Gribbin said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 12th, 2008, 04:21 AM   #65
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

Fewer Planes, but Not Fewer Delays
10 June 2008
The New York Times

WASHINGTON -- With airlines grounding planes because of fuel costs, there will be fewer planes in the sky. Logic suggests passengers could hope for fewer delays.

But the Federal Aviation Administration cautions that air traffic lanes will continue to be full in air space that is normally crowded.

The reason is that the airlines will contract their flying schedules in less-busy cities, which never had much congestion to begin with, and landing slots at busy airports will, for the most part, continue to be fully used, F.A.A. officials say. After all, big airports are the places where airlines can fill up big planes.

''We're going to see the concentration of large operators at the large airports,'' said Michael J. Sammartino, director of system operations at the F.A.A.'s Strategic Command Center in Herndon, Va.

Even so, the agency plans a variety of new steps to reduce delays, relying on new technologies and procedures.

Traffic at the top 35 airports was up 1.5 percent from October through April, compared with the same period a year earlier.

As always, the pattern among airports was mixed; Seattle-Tacoma was up 13.9 percent; San Francisco, 9 percent; Orlando, 8.4 percent; Reagan National Airport in Washington, 8.3 percent; and Charlotte, N.C., 7 percent. Two historically congested airports, Kennedy Airport and Newark Liberty, showed increases of 5.1 percent and 1.1 percent, respectively. But Boston's Logan was down 3.6 percent; Pittsburgh, 3.4 percent; and Chicago's O'Hare, 3 percent.

Not everyone agrees that traffic will stay strong at the big airports. The cuts will ripple through some of the country's biggest hubs, said Joseph P. Schwieterman, a professor at DePaul University and an expert on air transportation.

''Some airports will see a double-digit percentage decline in flights by late fall,'' he added, though most of the cuts are likely to occur during off-peak flying periods. ''All the airlines haven't played their hands yet, but at $130 fuel I don't think there's much doubt'' that there will be steep cuts in service.

The cuts will not be permanent, some industry experts say. ''The reduction in service domestically is a short-term phenomenon,'' said Aaron J. Gellman, a professor of management and strategy at Northwestern University's Transportation Center.

''This is partly based on the belief that fuel prices will come down and economic growth will become quite vigorous again,'' he said. ''There's a market out there to be served. I don't think the airlines will fail to do so.''

In New York, the big change is probably not in the volume of flights, but in caps imposed by the F.A.A. on the number of landings and takeoffs that can be scheduled per hour at Kennedy and Newark. The busy time now starts earlier in the day, and the total number of flights may rise, according to the F.A.A. and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

With the old system of peaks and valleys in the level of operation, controllers could use a normally quiet time to clear out a backlog; now there are no normally quiet times. The result, said Nancy B. Kalinowski, vice president of the F.A.A.'s Air Traffic Organization, is that ''a good day should be good, but a bad day will be horrid.''

Port Authority officials say delays at New York-area airports have varied independently of the level of operations, and they are not sure that thinning out the traffic will reduce delays.

''I don't get the level of delay we're getting now,'' said William R. DeCota, executive director of aviation at the Port Authority. The Port Authority opposed the flight caps imposed by the F.A.A.

The F.A.A., though, says the caps will help smooth out the traffic flow. It has a variety of other changes in place, in New York and elsewhere, to cut delays. Ms. Kalinowski says that ''2008 is going to be different from the summer of 2007. I'm not going to use the word 'hoping.' We are planning for it to be different.''

To speed up traffic, the F.A.A. is opening new routes for jets that are equipped with satellite navigation. The routes are separated by 8 to 12 miles -- close by traditional standards but a lot of space if the plane's location is more precisely known.

Those routes are over land, and the agency has taken a parallel step over the Atlantic, adding paths that airliners equipped with satellite navigation can follow from the New York area to the Caribbean. Planes flying over water, where there is no radar, used to be separated laterally by 90 miles; now they are separated by 50.

The F.A.A. will also borrow space off the Atlantic coast from the military this summer, as it did last Thanksgiving and Christmas, but it plans a more sophisticated approach, with predesignated routes, which will make it easier for airlines to plan their flights. The F.A.A. also plans to make requests from the Pentagon longer in advance, on the basis of forecasted thunderstorms.

The agency has also adopted ''dispersal headings'' for planes departing from Newark and Philadelphia. Planes leaving those airports will peel off in different directions earlier in their flights, allowing more departures each hour.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2008, 10:41 AM   #66
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

Father's Day turns sour for NY-bound airline passengers
15 June 2008

ONTARIO, Calif. (AP) - John Ehrlich says he's heard quite a few excuses from airlines about flight delays. But the one given to him on Sunday that prevented him from spending his Father's Day at a New York Mets game with his three sons was a first.

Scheduled to leave for New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport on a JetBlue redeye flight, Ehrlich and more than 100 other passengers were told their departure would be pushed back until the flight attendants, delayed by an East Coast thunderstorm, received their mandatory nine-hour break.

Ehrlich, 55, said the airline initially promised a several-hours delay, but it eventually turned into an overnight stay at the Ontario International Airport as grouchy passengers huddled up in chairs and slept on the floor waiting for a backup crew to arrive.

"It's unbelievable to me how they could send a plane out and the plane is gassed up and ready to go and they can't send it out because the flight crew must take a mandatory break," said Ehrlich, of Westchester. "If that was the case they should have sent along two or three extra crew members."

JetBlue spokesman Bryan Baldwin said thunderstorms on the East Coast delayed the jet from arriving at Ontario for six hours. The plane, with a new flight attendant crew scrambled from nearby, took off for New York at 10 a.m. Sunday.

The attendants who work the flight from New York to Ontario normally accompany the plane back, Baldwin said. After it was delayed, federal regulations wouldn't allow putting them back on board sooner.

"Flight attendants usually do the turnaround," he said. "We have pilots ready to go, but we normally don't have a flight attendant crew. We try to plan ahead as much as we can."

Airline passengers can expect a rough summer as carriers pass along higher fares and service charges because of record fuel prices. Data released last month by the U.S. Department of Transportation showed nearly 30 percent of domestic flights were late or canceled in March.

Flight attendants whose shifts are 14 hours or less are entitled to rest periods of at least nine consecutive hours, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. The break can be reduced to eight consecutive hours if the flight attendant is provided a subsequent rest period of at least 10 consecutive hours, the FAA said.

Ehrlich, an advertising salesman, was frustrated that he wouldn't be able to go to the Mets game with his sons.

"Now, 132 people don't have Father's Day with their families," he said.

Some passengers took the delay in stride. Bill Schlote, of Sierra Madre, Calif., and his son were traveling to New York to see the New York Yankees play the San Diego Padres on Tuesday. Schlote, 65, said he likely will miss a party on Long Island to celebrate his friends' wedding anniversary.

"I'm too old to worry about this stuff anymore," said Schlote, who added he's not a frequent flier. "But if I had to put up with this all the time, I'd be upset."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 25th, 2008, 11:29 AM   #67
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

BAA 'should axe 5,000 flights' to reduce delays at Heathrow
25 June 2008
The Guardian

BAA, the owner of Heathrow airport, should scrap nearly 5,000 flights per year to ease congestion at Britain's biggest flight hub, according to a business group.

London First said action needs to be taken immediately to stop delays at Heathrow, because a proposed third runway will not be ready until at least 2020. The lobby group for businesses in the capital said Heathrow's owner, BAA, could reduce delays by cutting 1% of flights - equivalent to 4,800 arrivals and departures.

Baroness Valentine, London First's chief executive, said Heathrow had been turned from a "silk purse to a sow's ear". She added: "While proposals for Runway 3 will undeniably address capacity issues in the long term, we need a better Heathrow now." London First proposes a reduction in flights in a report into poor service standards at Heathrow.

The report, out today, also recommends delegating responsibility for monitoring security queues, currently shared by BAA and the Civil Aviation Authority, to a single organisation, while revenue from landing fees should be docked if passengers receive poor service.

London First added that the regulatory framework, which is overseen by the CAA and sets landing fees, was geared to "cramming in extra flights and passengers".

Ruth Kelly, the transport secretary, is expected to back the report at its launch. The government claims it is making passengers' lives easier in the short term by lifting restrictions on hand luggage - only one bag per passenger until recently - and backing plans for a third runway. The government has also ordered a review of airport regulation, prompting speculation the CAA will undergo significant reform.

The chief executive of BAA, Colin Matthews, is expected to reject the London First report today at a conference on aviation and the environment. Matthews, who joined BAA in the spring, is expected to argue making Heathrow better before it is bigger is a "false choice" because building new and improved terminals without new runway capacity will not reduce delays.

Four out of 10 Heathrow flights are delayed because both runways operate at 99% of capacity, meaning a minor security scare or freak weather wreak havoc.

In the latest disruption, 69 flights were cancelled nearly a fortnight ago when President Bush flew in, forcing the closure of one runway and a temporary block on all departures. Willie Walsh, British Airways chief executive, said he was "angry" that BAA allowed the president's entourage to use the airport. BA cancelled 53 services.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 25th, 2008, 11:30 AM   #68
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

Cut flights to combat 'Heathrow hassle': London business group
24 June 2008
Agence France Presse

London Heathrow Airport should operate fewer flights to reduce the "Heathrow hassle" factor threatening the city's prosperity, a top London business organisation said Wednesday.

Alternatively the size of Heathrow -- the world's busiest international passenger airport -- should be increased, but the flight levels kept unchanged, said London First, which represents the British capital's leading employers.

The lobby group, which wants to make London the best city in the world in which to do business, is worried that customers and clients may go elsewhere if they find using Heathrow a bother.

Heathrow is struggling to regain its reputation after the new 4.3-billion-pound (8.7-billion-dollar, 5.6-billion-euro) Terminal 5 descended into chaos with chronic baggage problems.

London First said in a report that "warped incentives" caused "Heathrow hassle", with passengers suffering flight delays, long waits, poor service and deteriorating buildings.

The financial incentives for the Civil Aviation Authority regulator and the airport's operator BAA were geared to "cramming in extra flights and passengers", the group said.

The report suggested making one organisation responsible for cutting passenger queues; improving sub-standard buildings, and reduce flight delays by either increasing Heathrow's capacity or cutting the number of flights.

"Heathrow has been turned from a silk purse to a sow's ear," said London First chief executive Baroness Jo Valentine.

"For years, government, policy-makers and the regulator have failed to prioritise the interests of airport passengers ... Quite simply, if business can't fly easily, reliably and comfortably from London, it will go elsewhere."

In April, British Airways chief Willie Walsh said the state of Heathrow was damaging the country's reputation and economy.

And Don Langford, head of customer services Europe for American Airlines, branded it a "bit of a dump" and the "worst" among major European air hubs.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown's government is considering plans to build a third runway and a sixth terminal at Heathrow, saying expansion is necessary to safeguard its status as a major world airport.

The British Chambers of Commerce, which represents British business interests around the world, says expansion is essential to keep the country economically competitive.

However, there is a large protest movement against the plans and London Mayor Boris Johnson opposes the idea.

"While proposals for Runway Three will undeniably address capacity issues in the long term, we need a better Heathrow now," Valentine said.

"An overhaul of airport regulation is needed to secure tangible and rapid improvement if the reputation of Heathrow and of London is to be restored."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 25th, 2008, 03:03 PM   #69
melbstud
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 667
Likes (Received): 7

I was watching CNN and Qantas has had a bad week/s with many delays, strike I think.
melbstud no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 26th, 2008, 12:29 PM   #70
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

^ Yes, strike actions have been plaguing Qantas in recent weeks.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2008, 12:15 PM   #71
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

EU Commission proposes air traffic overhaul
24 June 2008

BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP) - The European Commission will propose an overhaul of the EU's aviation sector Wednesday to clear the way for the likely doubling of air traffic by 2020.

The plan seeks to make room for more planes, create more fuel-efficient routes and cut 27 national air traffic control systems into nine regional zones.

The EU executive argues a revamp of Europe's air traffic control network is needed if the EU is to meet its climate change targets, end congestion at airports and in the air and provide room for aviation to grow in the years ahead.

Europe's air traffic management sector employs 50,000 people, including 15,000 air traffic controllers, whose wages account for 70 percent of overall ATM costs, according to EU data.

"The relative absence of fragmentation is one major element helping to make the United States air traffic management system twice as efficient as that of the EU," the European Commission says in a report to be released Wednesday.

The EU has worked to open up the continent's highly protected airways since the early 1990s.

It has led to the emergence of low cost airlines but the 27 EU nations still have 60 air traffic control centers. Officials want to simplify that system.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 9th, 2008, 06:09 AM   #72
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

Airlines get higher on-time grades
But May performance still included 21% of flights delayed.

ASSOCIATED PRESS
8 July 2008

NEW YORK

Domestic airlines improved their on-time arrival rates in May, though more than one in five flights still failed to get passengers to destinations as scheduled, according to government data released Monday.

A total of 21 percent of commercial flights in the U.S. arrived at least 15 minutes late, were canceled or diverted in May, according to the Transportation Department's Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

That is down from more than 22 percent of late flights in the same month last year and in April 2008. The previous month's figure was higher in part because AMR Corp.'s American Airlines, the nation's largest carrier, was forced to ground thousands of flights amid tighter government scrutiny of maintenance issues.

For the third month in a row, American ranked last in on-time service. Passengers on just over two-thirds of the Fort Worth, Texas-based carrier's flights - 67.3 percent - got to their destinations on time in May.

"Unfortunately, the main reasons include weather and significant (air-traffic control) delays at three of our main network operating areas" in Chicago, New York, and Dallas-Fort Worth, as well as in Miami, American spokesman Tim Smith said in an e-mailed statement.

UAL Corp.'s United Airlines, the second-largest carrier, which reported 72.4 percent of arrivals were on time, and Continental Airlines Inc., with 75.4 percent, rounded out the bottom of the on-time list..

The New York area continues to account for some of the worst delays. New York's LaGuardia and Newark Liberty International in New Jersey swapped places to rank second to last and last among major airports. Fewer than two-thirds of passengers at either airport arrived on time in May.

Weather was by far the biggest cause of late flights nationwide in May, accounting for just over 44 percent of all delays. Only about 39 percent of flights were late because of weather a year earlier.

U.S. carriers also improved their baggage handling in May. About 4.6 passengers of every 1,000 reported a mishandled bag during the month, compared with nearly 6 per 1,000 a year earlier and 5 per 1,000 in April.

Reported passenger complaints fell to 885, compared with 930 a year earlier and 1,113 in April.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 9th, 2008, 01:39 PM   #73
SLion
:)
 
SLion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 159
Likes (Received): 7

Looks like a one man show...
My flight got delayed for 12 hours, and I'm travelling again tomorrow, Inshallah.
__________________
Free al-Quds
SLion no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 16th, 2008, 07:03 AM   #74
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

Impact of flight delay countermeasures questioned
15 July 2008

ATLANTA (AP) - Federal Aviation Administration and Department of Transportation actions that are being implemented will have a limited effect on reducing flight delays during the summer compared to last year, according to a U.S. Government Accountability Office study released Tuesday.

The study by the federal watchdog agency and testimony a representative issued at a hearing in Washington were based on an analysis of DOT data on airline on-time performance, a review of documents and reports, and interviews with officials from DOT, FAA, airport operators, and airlines, as well as aviation industry experts and associations.

The GAO cited DOT data that show that more than one in four flights either arrived late or were canceled in 2007, making it one of the worst years for delays in the last decade.

The GAO noted that to reduce delays and congestion beginning this summer, DOT and FAA have been implementing several actions to improve capacity at the airport or system level and the hourly schedule caps on operations at the New York area airports.

"DOT's and FAA's capacity-enhancing initiatives and demand management policies may help reduce delay, but the collective impact of these actions on reducing delay in 2008 is limited," the GAO concluded.

FAA spokeswoman Tammy Jones said the agency has put initiatives in place to try to reduce delays, particularly at the New York area airports. She said weather and congestion are problems.

"I think some of what we're putting into place is working, and some of it is pretty much out of our control," Jones said.

Tyler Duvall, acting undersecretary for policy at the DOT, said he believes the actions the government has taken are having a substantial impact in making sure the flight delay problem doesn't get worse, especially in the New York area.

"In our view, we are using every administrative tool we have at our disposal," Duvall said. "In the long run, Congress has to act to modernize the air traffic control system."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 7th, 2008, 07:07 PM   #75
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

US airlines threaten to sue over slot auctions

WASHINGTON, Aug 5 (Reuters) - U.S. airlines threatened on Tuesday to sue the Bush administration over its plan to cut delays at one of the nation's most congested airports even as new data shows over a quarter of all flights are late.

The Air Transport Association, the lead trade group for major carriers, said in a statement that the U.S. Transportation Department proposal to auction landing slots at New Jersey's Newark airport is unlawful and widely opposed.

"DOT has left us no options - we will sue to prevent this illegal action," James May, the trade association's chief executive said.

Relations between airlines and transportation planners have deteriorated sharply over the past several months as government efforts to reduce delays have clashed with carriers losing altitude financially due to record high fuel prices.

"The timing is incredible -- in the middle of an enormous financial crisis that is reshaping the industry," said Giovanni Bisignani, director general of the trade group representing overseas carriers, the International Air Transport Association.

The Transportation Department proposed on Tuesday auctioning unused rights for one round-trip flight at Newark to gauge interest and determine their value.

The auction decision came hours after the agency released its latest industry on-time figures showing delays remained stubbornly high in the first half of 2008 even though operations and travel demand were both down.

The on-time rating of 73.3 percent was just slightly better than the record low 72.6 percent in the first half of last year, even though operations contracted due to record fuel prices and bankruptcies. Several small airlines ceased operations this year.

Airlines flew 3.6 million flights carrying 303 million passengers in the January-June period, compared with 3.7 million flights and 309 million passengers a year earlier.

New York's LaGuardia Airport had the worst on-time arrival performance of the 32 busiest airports, while Chicago's O'Hare was last for timely departures. Both airports are notoriously congested and often rank at or near the bottom in performance categories.

Newark ranked next to last in on-time arrival performance, only ahead of LaGuardia.

MARKET MECHANISMS

Transportation Secretary Mary Peters has long championed "market-based" mechanisms for reducing congestion. She believes forcing airlines to bid for slots for the busiest times of day would prompt airlines to rethink their operations, perhaps using bigger planes.

"Such measures have been very successful at managing congestion in other transportation modes and can provide strong incentives for more efficient use of a strained resource, like New York-area airports," Peters said. The auction is planned for Sept. 3.

On Monday, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, which operates JFK, Newark and LaGuardia airports, said it would not recognize slot auctions on grounds they would hurt business and reduce service to small communities.

Transportation officials believe they have the legal authority to move forward unless Congress steps in and acts on pending legislation to block the move when lawmakers return in September.

Democrat Patty Murray and Republican Christopher Bond, the chairman and ranking member respectively of the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on transportation, told Peters in a letter on Tuesday to wait for "clear authority" from Congress.

"There is no question that your insistence on moving forward (with) these controversial efforts will subject the department and the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) to extensive and costly litigation that will benefit nether the taxpayer nor the traveler," they wrote.

Murray and Bond also are unhappy that Peters has diverted "millions in FAA operating funds" to administer the auction.

Airline shares shrugged off yet more bad news about delays, rising sharply Tuesday on lower oil prices. The Amex Airline Index rose 9.6 percent.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2008, 04:58 AM   #76
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

Airlines' July on-time performance improves
3 September 2008

ATLANTA (AP) - Delta Air Lines' regional subsidiary Comair had the worst on-time performance in July among airlines surveyed by the Transportation Department, according to government data released Wednesday.

But overall, the nation's airlines were on time more often in July compared to a year ago, and customers filed fewer complaints about their baggage, the agency said.

The DOT's Bureau of Transportation Statistics said the 19 carriers reporting on-time performance recorded an overall on-time arrival rate of 75.7 percent in July, higher than both July 2007's 69.8 percent and June 2008's 70.8 percent.

The agency also said that the nation's carriers canceled 1.7 percent of their scheduled domestic flights in July, lower than both the 2.1 percent cancellation rate of July 2007 and the 1.8 percent rate posted in June of this year.

Erlanger, Ky.-based Comair had the worst on-time arrival rate, at 63.31 percent. JetBlue Airways was next at 64.6 percent. UAL Corp.'s United Airlines was third worst at 68.25 percent and AMR Corp.'s American Airlines, which had the worst on-time performance in June, was fourth from the bottom in July, at 69.51 percent.

Regional carrier Pinnacle Airlines had the best on-time rate in July compared to a year ago, at 85.6 percent, according to the government's data.

Comair spokesman Jeff Pugh said in a statement that the airline has been steadily improving its performance over the years, though it continues to struggle with regional operational issues in the Northeast.

"Our focus continues to be on improving and controlling what we can," he said.

Among legacy carriers, Northwest Airlines Corp. had the best on-time performance in July compared to a year ago, at 79.51 percent, good for seventh best overall. Among discount carriers, Southwest Airlines was best, at 83.05 percent, good for third best overall.

The airlines got better in handling baggage.

Overall, the airlines posted a mishandled baggage rate of 4.86 reports per 1,000 passengers in July, an improvement over both July 2007's rate of 7.96 and June 2008's 5.15 rate.

Comair had the worst mishandled baggage rate in July with 9.02 reports per 1,000 passengers. Northwest had the best rate at 3.09.

In July, the airlines filing on-time performance data reported that 7.78 percent of their flights were delayed by aviation system delays, 7.17 percent by late-arriving aircraft, 6.3 percent by factors within the airline's control such as maintenance or crew problems and 1.01 percent by extreme weather, the government said.

Weather is a factor in both the extreme-weather category and the aviation-system category. This includes delays due to the rerouting of flights by the Federal Aviation Administration in consultation with the carriers involved. Weather is also a factor in delays attributed to late-arriving aircraft, although airlines do not report specific causes in that category, DOT said.

In July, 44.37 percent of late flights were delayed by weather, up 2.83 percent from July 2007, when 43.15 percent of late flights were delayed by weather, and down 6.02 percent from June of this year when 47.21 percent of late flights were delayed by weather.

Airlines struggling with high fuel costs have been raising fees for handling luggage and in some cases adding new fees for a first bag. Many airlines have been raising fares, as well.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2008, 05:29 PM   #77
serendip finder
Registered User
 
serendip finder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 78
Likes (Received): 5

American airports are the worst IMO. The new anti-terror measures are compounding the passengers' discomfort.

Two years ago when my family of 7 travelled to America, our airport of entry was Detroit. In the process of getting thru immigration, their computer system crashed. Me and 3 of my kids have already crossed immigration, while my wife and 2 of our kids were held up at the other end, along with other passengers. For the first few minutes we could still see and make faces to each other. But afterwards security moved those who were thru further away and around a wall so that we lost line of sight.

We had to wait 3 hours for the system to be restored, before the rest of my family got thru.

Afterwards, it was a mad dash to catch the alternate connecting flight we were assigned to.

Last edited by serendip finder; September 5th, 2008 at 05:33 PM. Reason: Clarity
serendip finder no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2008, 10:35 PM   #78
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

FAA: New flight navigational technology is greener
12 September 2008

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Federal Aviation Administration officials gathered Friday to promote new flight and navigational technologies that reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions while also decreasing passenger delays.

FAA officials at San Francisco International Airport watched the arrival of a blue-tailed Boeing 777 Airways New Zealand flight from Auckland to showcase airplanes controlled and monitored by satellite-based GPS rather than ground-based radar.

The flight was the first of its kind for the airline and part of an ongoing FAA effort to streamline trans-Pacific flights.

After exiting the plane, the Airways New Zealand pilot said Friday's flight saved 1,200 gallons (4,542 liters) of jet fuel and avoided 12 tons (11 metric tons) of carbon from being emitted into the air. Plus, passengers arrived five minutes ahead of schedule.

"From taxi to touch down, it's just flat-out green," FAA's Acting Administrator Robert Sturgell said of the coordinated use of GPS by airline pilots and air traffic control personnel.

The GPS-enabled technology allows planes to take more direct and fuel-efficient flight routes. Sturgell likened it to building a car pool lane in the sky.

Friday's display was part of a long-term initiative by the FAA to overhaul the technology used by the nation's air traffic controllers.

The FAA says the technology upgrade will improve safety, decrease delays and lower fuel costs for the struggling airline industry.

"With jet fuel going for three to four dollars a gallon, and more people than ever wanting to fly, we need to do everything we can to ensure that aviation remains a safe and efficient means of getting there," said Sturgell.

The FAA's GPS-based system requires increased collaboration between airline pilots navigating planes and air traffic controllers monitoring their movement.

The new system allows pilots more freedom in determining the most efficient route to a destination by climbing to high elevations more quickly and taking longer, more gradual descents to the runway.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2008, 07:41 AM   #79
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

Low-cost carriers top airline quality rankings
10 November 2008

DALLAS (AP) - Low-cost carriers topped the rankings of U.S. airlines for being on-time and uniting bags with passengers, while the big guys such as American Airlines brought up the rear, according to a new study of airline quality.

Overall airline performance continued a 5-year slide during the first half of this year, the researchers said in the study released Monday. But there were encouraging signs that the performance of the nation's top 17 airlines might be improving, as on-time arrivals and customer complaint rates improved in early summer over last year's levels.

The report's authors said the airlines might continue to sharpen their on-time performance because the skies are less crowded. Carriers have been eliminating flights in a move designed to reduce costs and drive up ticket prices by creating seat shortages.

"Air travel will cost more, but if you can find a seat, it may be operating better," said Dean Headley, a co-author of the report and a marketing professor at Wichita State University.

Headley said the dreaded holiday travel season -- December is usually the worst month for airline performance -- also could be better than expected.

The research is sponsored by Saint Louis University and by Wichita State. One of the report's authors moved from the University of Nebraska at Omaha to Saint Louis University earlier this year.

The researchers said low-cost airlines led the rankings, trailed by the bigger legacy carriers that operate vast and complicated hub-and-spoke flight networks.

Hawaiian Airlines was rated best at being on-time, at 92 percent for the January-June period. AirTran Airways was tops at handling baggage, and Southwest Airlines Co. best in customer complaints, at one for every 300,000 customers. JetBlue Airways had the fewest denied boardings.

AMR Corp.'s American Airlines was the worst in on-time performance, at just 63.2 percent. UAL Corp.'s United Airlines had the highest rate of customer complaints, seven times more than Southwest.

AMR's American Eagle, a feeder airline for American, was the worst baggage handler, mishandling luggage more than three times as often as AirTran.

Ratings by the Wichita State and Saint Louis University researchers were based on information compiled by the U.S. Transportation Department.

The academics' report is one of several widely watched measures of airline quality. Last week, the Transportation Department reported that more flights arrived on time in September but that cancellations increased.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 12th, 2008, 03:17 AM   #80
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,962
Likes (Received): 18223

New guidelines won't require action to help passengers on planes delayed for takeoff
11 November 2008

WASHINGTON (AP) - A federal task force that spent nearly a year wrestling with ways to assist people delayed for hours aboard planes parked on tarmacs has finalized its recommendations -- none of which requires airlines and airports to do anything.

The tarmac task force, as it is informally known, is expected to vote Wednesday on guidelines for airlines and airports on how to craft their own contingency plans for dealing with lengthy tarmac delays.

Among the problems: The task force was unable to agree on whether "lengthy" is one hour, two hours or 10 hours.

Kate Hanni, a task force member and passenger rights advocate, said Tuesday there is nothing in the draft document that requires airlines or airports to provide additional services for passengers stranded aboard airplanes going nowhere.

The report "is a set of best practices, but there's nothing enforceable where a passenger can say, 'I won't be held up for more than three hours or five hours or eight hours, or without a glass of water or a sandwich,'" said Hanni, founder of the Coalition for an Airline Passengers' Bill of Rights.

"We were hoping at a bare minimum to come out of this task force with a definition of what is an extensive on-ground delay," Hanni said, but that didn't happened because the airline industry "doesn't want anything that is remotely enforceable."

The 36-member task force was created last December by Transportation Secretary Mary Peters to develop model plans for airlines and airports after several incidents in which passengers were stuck for hours before their flight took off or they were allowed to get off the plane.

Task force members said it quickly became apparent that the group -- dominated by airline industry and airport representatives -- would be unable to come up with a model plan acceptable to a majority of members.

"The airlines don't want it, and the airports -- several of them major airports -- believe they already have plans" to deal with passengers stuck aboard aircraft, said task force member Paul Ruden, a senior vice president at the American Society of Travel Agents.

Ruden said his main objection is that the task force does not ask Peters to require airlines and airports to develop contingency plans.

"I had hoped we would do more," Ruden said, adding that the recommendations might still be of use to smaller airports and airlines.

The Air Transport Association, the trade association for the airline industry, said the task force achieved its objective and some of its recommendations are already being adopted by the industry.

"The success of the task force clearly demonstrates that not every problem requires a new law or regulation, especially when it comes to operational and customer-service issues," Elizabeth Merida, a spokeswoman for the association, said in a statement.

A draft of the task force report recommends that:

-- Airlines update passengers delayed on tarmacs every 15 minutes even if there is nothing new to report.

-- A secure room be provided for passengers from diverted overseas flights so they can avoid having to go through security checks when reboarding an aircraft to their final destination.

-- When practical, refreshments and entertainment should be made available to passengers confined aboard aircraft awaiting takeoff.

-- Airlines should "make every reasonable effort" to be keep airplane restrooms usable.

The Transportation Department's inspector general last fall recommended setting a limit for how long airlines can force passengers to wait on planes that have been delayed taking off.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium