daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 16th, 2008, 10:17 PM   #81
I-275westcoastfl
Registered User
 
I-275westcoastfl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 6,144
Likes (Received): 790

Quote:
Originally Posted by gladisimo View Post
Two of my family friends used to have holiday homes in Fairview Park, then they realized they almost never used them and sold them.

Fairview Park is "Gum Sao Fa Yuen" right?

I must say, when I went there as a kid, it was quite exciting to see suburban style housing...
Isn't that funny how in America its the opposite, we are excited to see big cities, not suburbs.
I-275westcoastfl no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 17th, 2008, 12:47 AM   #82
zdaddy233
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 103
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by I-275westcoastfl View Post
Isn't that funny how in America its the opposite, we are excited to see big cities, not suburbs.
part of that is due to the vast population located in rural areas or smaller cities
zdaddy233 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 17th, 2008, 03:57 PM   #83
EricIsHim
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,397
Likes (Received): 28

You get the same "wow" effect for kids that grows up in New York City, especially those live in Manhattan. They think Fairfield County, Connecticut is a country side; and in fact that is the most developed urban area in the state.
__________________
EricIsHim
My PhotoBucket
EricIsHim no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 12th, 2008, 07:52 PM   #84
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

High-rise freeze call in warm Kowloon
Hong Kong Standard
Tuesday, June 10, 2008

A green group wants a freeze on skyscraper development in Tai Kok Tsui in west Kowloon to slow urban warming and to prevent the wind-blocking encirclement of its town center.

"It is a common complaint of local residents that the area's temperatures have been rising steadily over the past decade, while the only major changes have been the series of high-rises forming a ring around Tai Kok Tsui," said Greensense president Roy Tam Hoi- pong.

Tam's group, which is calling for the government to construct roof-top gardens on the district's low-rise apartment buildings, will meet the Buildings Department to call for a hold on tower developments in the area and the disclosure of further building plans in the neighborhood.

Tam said the old town center clustered near the intersection of Tai Kok Tsui Road and Fuk Tsun Street is being choked by a series of high-rises.

He said Park Avenue and Central Park are dominating the south, and One SilverSea, Harbour Green, Metro Harborview and the Urban Renewal Authority's Cherry Street and Bedford Street projects towering above the north and west.

The group is also calling for a halt to the construction of Sino Land's Hoi Ting Road project which will complete the circle and turn the district into "Kowloon's newest walled city," Tam said.

An application by concerned student Bernard Tang Fai-cheong to view Sino Land's construction plan at the Buildings Department was rejected.

A similar request to Sino Land was also turned down.

A May survey of 283 residents found nearly 67.5 percent thought the building's orientation would reduce airflow, and 31 percent thought the blocks were too high.

The survey also found 71.8 percent in support of full public consultation for future projects, and 71.4 percent thought the skyscrapers were responsible for reducing airflow.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2008, 07:46 PM   #85
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

MTRC escapes need for wall-effect study
Hong Kong Standard
Thursday, June 26, 2008

The government yesterday stonewalled lawmakers calling for height restrictions on two high-rise hotel blocks and 20 residential towers along the Tsuen Wan waterfront.

Lawmakers were told the Mass Transit Railway Corp development, said to be 194 meters tall, will not be subject to a "wall effect" assessment because approval was given 10 years ago.

The Town Planning Board has approved the project at the Tsuen Wan West Station of the West Rail, but work has not yet started.

Lawmakers called for the government to force the MTRC to study the "wall effect" of the project, which they claim will hamper air flow in the area.

But the government refused to push the rail operator to carry out an environmental impact study because the project was passed long before new air quality guidelines were introduced in 2006.

The Democratic Party's Lee Wing-tat, who raised the issue in the Legislative Council, said the project is a repeat of the Hopewell Holdings' controversial Wan Chai mega tower development, which faced fierce opposition over its effect on air quality.

"There is a public consensus the buildings have a high wall effect. The MTRC is majority owned by the government, and while it wants to reduce the density along the harbor, then why is this not being done?" Lee asked.

Secretary for Development Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor said the project could not be undone as there would be "consequential losses."

Democratic Party lawmaker Albert Ho Chun-yan said the aspirations and demands of the community for better air quality and the environment have changed in the past decade and the government needs to respond to them.

He called for town planning laws to be reviewed, so that projects approved before 2006 would need to face a second round of approval.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 14th, 2008, 06:32 PM   #86
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

Greens renew attack on Tsuen Wan 'wall'
14 July 2008
South China Morning Post

An environmental group has criticised the government for not heeding its calls to reduce building densities at Tsuen Wan West's developments.

Green Sense said the quality of life for about 70,000 Tsuen Wan residents could be at stake if 22 residential buildings and hotels were built along the waterfront, creating a wall 1km long blocking airflow.

Group chairman Roy Tam Hoi-pong said the Town Planning Board had agreed to the master layout plan of the project near Tsuen Wan West station, which included 20 residential buildings and two hotels.

The group wants the authorities to scale down the development projects by nine tower blocks, a move that Mr Tam said would create an 80-metre corridor for ventilation.

While he could not estimate the decrease in value of the plots that would result from the reduction, he said the move would bring long-term benefits for people's well-being.

"I think the health of the citizens is more important. When the government has such a surplus, it is important to consider carefully projects that could bring permanent damage to the community," he said.

The group also plans to apply for the rezoning of a hotel project at Lot 393 Yeung Uk Road to open space. He said a high-rise hotel would add to the so-called wall effect created by the row of buildings being planned along the coast.

The group has opposed the construction of high-rises packed in rows, a style often used so that buildings share the best view, saying the long-time approach to the city's development would harm the city in the long run by pushing up temperatures and decreasing ventilation.

Mr Tam said the government had ignored the group's call for scaling down the Tsuen Wan West project while having agreed to reduce density in other railway property projects in Yuen Long and Nam Cheong.

He said it was necessary for the authorities to review the development plan, even though it had been approved by the Town Planning Board, because the plan was approved when the consequences of wall effects was not well known.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2008, 06:48 PM   #87
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

Group wants project's plot ratio reduced
29 July 2008
South China Morning Post





An environmental group is to file an application with the Planning Department demanding a reduction in the plot ratio of a development in Tsuen Wan West, in an effort to lower temperatures in the town centre.

A spokesman for Green Sense said Tsuen Wan suffered from the heat island effect, which meant temperatures in the town centre were higher than those near the sea. Cement in the town centre absorbs heat during the day and releases it at night, leading to higher temperatures than elsewhere in the district.

In a study done on Sunday, Green Sense found the temperature in the town centre was 38 degrees Celsius, three to four degrees higher than areas near the sea. The group will apply to the department for the plot ratio of a proposed seven-building development in Tsuen Wan West to be reduced to three from five.

Plot ratio defines the total floor area of buildings allowed to be erected on a site. It is calculated by dividing net floor area by the net site area.

The Green Sense spokesman said the number of buildings would have to be cut to four if the plot ratio was lowered. "Tsuen Wan district residents' health and air quality are more important than developing these buildings, which would create a wall effect."

On Friday, the MTR Corporation sought expressions of interest for the proposed development of seven residential buildings, comprising 1,776 flats.

It is one of three sites the rail company plans to develop in the area. One of the other two sites is on top of Tsuen Wan West station, where 11 residential buildings are planned.

The MTR Corp inherited these sites from the merger with Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2008, 01:44 PM   #88
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

Opinion : Lawmakers should help citizens in fight against 'wall-effect' buildings
14 September 2008
South China Morning Post

Many Hong Kong people are now standing up and opposing developments which block airflow and raise the temperatures in the areas where they live.

This makes me happy because they are finally taking responsibility for the protection of their own living area. Many who were indifferent about society have now abandoned that attitude.

What saddens me is that our government and politicians seem to be doing nothing about this problem.

You read reports about a new building project [known as a wall development] which will cut off breezes to the flats behind it.

However the powers-that-be seem happy to turn a blind eye to this problem.

The Hong Kong government seems happy to sell land on the waterfront to developers so they can construct these [wall-effect] buildings.

Rather than thinking about what effect these buildings will have on the residents who are already there, it is more concerned with the fortune it will make from the land sale.

I hope those lawmakers in the new Legislative Council will stick to any promises they made to voters regarding the environment during their election campaign.

They must make good on their promises in the Legco chamber. What Hong Kong people want is better living standards. We want our basic human rights given back to us.

Those lawmakers who have professional skills should put them to good use. If they have expertise in fields such as surveying and town planning, then they should be willing to give advice to these activists who are trying to curb the growth of the wall-effect buildings. Ordinary people who are just trying to ensure better neighbourhoods could do with a helping hand, to, for example, understand technical terms in town planning documents.

Those residents who are taking action against such environmentally-unfriendly projects are not asking for much. They just want to be able to get a breeze and some sunlight in their homes and to have more public open space in the areas where they live.

Karina Ng, Ap Lei Chau
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 23rd, 2008, 05:55 AM   #89
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

Air flow study to be discussed
23 October 2008
South China Morning Post

The Town Planning Board will discuss tomorrow whether the MTR Corporation will have to conduct an air-ventilation study on a massive Tsuen Wan West development, which the Observatory suggests might block the prevailing winds blowing into the district from the sea.

The development calls for 20 residential towers and two hotels to be built along Tsuen Wan West Station. The environmental group Green Sense objects to the size of the project, arguing it will generate the "wall effect", blocking off air flow.

The proposed development is situated upwind, and Observatory data to be presented tomorrow shows the prevailing wind direction is mainly from the south to southeast, especially in summer. In the paper, the Observatory says it has no objection to Green Sense's application.

In July, Green Sense urged the board to review the plans. It asked the MTR Corp to lower the development density from 20 towers to 11 towers. In tomorrow's application Green Sense is proposing the number of towers behind Riviera Gardens be reduced from seven to four, a non-building area of about 1,700 square metres be designated northwest of the site, and a 20m wide non-building area be designated in the middle of the site.

Green Sense is also concerned about the urban "heat-island effect", which meant temperatures in the centre were higher than those near the sea. Cement absorbs heat during the day and releases it at night, leading to higher temperatures.

The paper reveals the Planning Department does not support the application. The department says Green Sense failed to prove its suggestions would improve air ventilation and reduce the visual "footprint" in the area.

A spokesman for MTR Corp said it was not required to conduct an air ventilation study because its master layout plan was approved in September 2005, which was 10 months before the government brought in new rules on the issue.

The corporation, however, would consider adding sky gardens and more greenery to the development to increase air flow to the inner city, the spokesman said.

The Planning Department said it had conveyed the concerns of the public to the MTR Corp but stressed the board had no provision to revoke the planning permission.

Town Planning Board vice-chairman Greg Wong Chak-yan said the MTR Corp and the developer should take its own initiative to conduct the air ventilation study as a social responsibility.

"It would be unfair to significantly change the project's scale after the tendering exercise," he said. "But a responsible developer would ensure its design will not downgrade the environment of residents living behind the development."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 23rd, 2008, 11:38 AM   #90
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

荃灣西站 環團申降密度料不批
23 October 2008
香港經濟日報

長實(00001)投得的荃灣西站第七區用地,遭環保觸覺向城規會申請降低密度,港鐵(00066)隨即提出反對,並指會預留20米通風廊,而規劃署亦指該地應按原計劃發展,不支持該申請,恐本周五難於城規會過關。

港鐵反駁 城規指應按原計劃

規劃署表示,由於荃灣西站第七區用地規劃為「綜合發展區」,早年在評估該地的發展內容時,已設定限制,加上該地位處鐵路上蓋的交通黃金地段,應盡量利用土地以配合交通發展,同時又指環保觸覺沒有提供足夠理據,顯示該地若降低地積比率及減少幢數,可以對空氣流通帶來改善,故不支持該申請。

環保觸覺就荃灣西站第七區用地,向城規會申請更改用地之註釋,包括︰○地積比若由5倍減至3倍,使由原計劃的7座減至4座;擔在地皮的西北方設面積約1,700平方米的非建築帶,以確保眾安街的通風廊不會被遮擋;以及○在地皮約中間的位置設下20米闊的非建築帶,避免座與座之間距離太近。

有關申請於公眾諮詢期間,共接獲11份意見,其中港鐵以項目代理人身份,向城規會提出反對意見,並羅列理據逐點反駁,並透露項目內7幢大廈分成3組設計,將預留最多20米的通風及景觀廊,力證有關發展不會對同區屋苑造成通風或景觀的問題。

另華置(00127)就位於東半山肇輝台12號新輝大廈,早向城規會申請略為放寬高限,擬建12層高住宅(包括4層平台及地庫),提供24伙,惟規劃署指有關發展之高度較比鄰大廈高了一截,恐對景觀造成影響,故不支持該申請。
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 24th, 2008, 01:43 PM   #91
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

Residents out to topple tower
Hong Kong Standard
Monday, October 06, 2008

Fortress Hill residents-turned-activists have enlisted the support of the city's pro- democratic forces in a bid to stop the building of a 123-meter tower near the harborfront.

Candise Chan Yee-wah of the Coalition Against the Proposed Development on King Wah Road will set up a booth close to the site on Sunday to boost awareness and collect signatures against the development. Political muscle has also been enlisted in the shape of the Civic Party's Tanya Chan Shuk-chong and the Democratic Party's Kam Nai-wai who are expected to make an appearance.

Candise Chan said they had collected 600 signatures so far.

"Ordinary people have the right to be informed of developments around their neighborhoods, and I don't think we are getting that from the authorities whose responsibility it is to inform us," Chan said. "The harbor belongs to us."

The Henderson Land Development project, in a car parking lot at 14-30 King Wah Road, consists of a 30-story commercial complex, "with eating places, shops and services," according to the Town Planning Board's website.

Cheung Kong Holding's 165-meter Harbour Grand hotel is already a building-in- progress directly adjacent to the empty lot.

"We are worried about the `wall effect' that another skyscraper will contribute to the area," Chan said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 24th, 2008, 10:37 PM   #92
gladisimo
If I could be anyone...
 
gladisimo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: SF, FC, HK
Posts: 2,525
Likes (Received): 39

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
"Ordinary people have the right to be informed of developments around their neighborhoods, and I don't think we are getting that from the authorities whose responsibility it is to inform us," Chan said. "The harbor belongs to us."

"We are worried about the `wall effect' that another skyscraper will contribute to the area," Chan said.
This is totally ridiculous. First of all, the harbour belongs to all of HK, not just these people in Fortress Hill. I agree they have a right to be INFORMED, but not that they can do anything about it. The piece of land belongs to the government, not them, and they have no right to protest what the government does to that piece of land, as long as it is reasonable.

If that building has the potential to benefit more than harm, there's no basis for these residents' argument at all, and there's no argument whatsoever when it comes to the harbor argument.

And the hype about the wall effect is just becoming disgustingly out of proportions.
__________________
I left my <3 in HK

RIP Dopey - 9/2005 - 20/2/2008
gladisimo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 1st, 2008, 07:10 PM   #93
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

城規會接295人投訴 憂塞車空氣污染
太古地產建屏風樓被拒

01/11/2008


【本報訊】政府提出修訂西半山分區計劃大綱圖,建議收緊多個地段的發展高度限制,包括太古地產仍與城巿規劃委員會進行法律訴訟的西摩道地皮;而太古地產提出反建議,高度上限不減反加,由政府建議的主水平基準二百一十五米,大幅增至二百七十三米,激發近三百居民及關注人士群起反對,炮轟太古地產的不合理建議會令附近一帶的屏風效應及交通擠塞問題加劇,損害公眾利益。城規會未有接納太古地產的反建議。

反建議放寬樓層限制
據現行規定,所有已獲批的發展圖則不受新修訂影響,但太古地產與城規會就西摩道地皮發展爭拗的官司仍未解決,一旦最終要改動在地皮建摩天屏風樓的圖則,將受新修訂規限,樓宇高度由五十多層減至三十層,太古地產因而提出反對,反要求城規會按其屏風樓的發展規模,放寬現有限制。

城規會公布太古地產的反建議後,接獲二百九十五份意見,反對太古地產的不合理要求,認為會引致附近交通擠塞、空氣污染、熱島效應等問題日趨嚴重。西半山關注組發言人李美娜指,一旦太古地產可成功建成屏風樓,會遮擋附近大廈,阻礙日光照射及空氣流通,居民難見藍天,令生活環境轉差。反屏風樓大聯盟六名成員亦在場外請願,要求城規會嚴守西半山樓宇高度及地積比率限制的重要關卡。

規劃署規劃專員區潔英表示,不支持太古地產的反建議,而城規會最終未有接納有關的反建議。
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2008, 06:32 AM   #94
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

Opinion : Reluctance for air study in line with MTR's Orwellian vision
3 November 2008
South China Morning Post

It is distressing that the MTR is not showing the corporate social responsibility one would expect from an arm of our government which claims it is dedicated to sustainable development and whose chief executive placed resolving air pollution to the fore in his policy address.

I refer to the reluctance of the MTR to conduct an air ventilation study on its massive Tsuen Wan development. Of course we know why the MTR does not want this study. It will conclude that the wall of concrete to be erected on the Tsuen Wan waterfront will have a significantly negative impact on airflow and ventilation and an adverse impact on the health and well-being of residents with homes behind it.

Once again the usual excuses that we are weary of hearing are trotted out - comprehensive development area, master layout plans, approvals and planning permission granted in the dark ages and ventilation studies were not compulsory at the time. Well, in the year 2000 we still had blue skies; now we look out of our windows every day on to the grey pea soup that passes for air.

On October 23, ATV's Focus Asia: Business Leaders featured Chow Chung-kong, chief executive of the MTR Corporation. I hope that I was not the only viewer who was disturbed by his Orwellian vision for Hong Kong. He boasted that living in gated high-rise communities above train stations allows people to go back and forth to their work place, dine and shop in internal malls and never leave the "mother ship" of the MTR.

This concept completely ignores the benefits to a community of interaction among different classes, leaving one's comfort zone, exploring, feeling the sun on one's face, getting a little dirty and the myriad experiences that go towards the formation of a society that is both experienced and integrated. The MTR vision on the other hand promotes exclusion, division of the community on income levels, lack of initiative and an unhealthy lifestyle.

It is time the MTR revaluated its focus in line with the aspirations of its stakeholders, the Hong Kong public. Government officials must stop hiding behind lame excuses and put public interest first. The air ventilation assessment must go ahead.

Martin Brinkley, Ma Wan
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 9th, 2008, 04:19 PM   #95
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

A group of socially conscious architects are pooling their ideas at Dutch firm MVRDV to tackle the problem of urban density.
They even have some plans for Hong Kong
7 November 2008
South China Morning Post

ID-AFTERNOON IN Rotterdam, and I'm inside a former print works that has been converted into a laboratory of ideas. Soft autumn sunlight pours through large windows, casting long shadows over desks littered with blue Styrofoam models. One is a house that extends over the edge of a hill for 80 metres. Another is a 40-storey tower block designed as a vertical farm for 4,000 pigs. Each floor has a carpet of sod and all the power is generated from pig waste.

This is the Dutch headquarters of architectural firm MVRDV, where its staff of young visionaries are trying to save Holland, and the world.

"Many people hate cities but most human beings live in one," says Jacob van Rijs, one of MVRDV's three partners. "As architects we have a special responsibility to make living in cities and under dense circumstances not just habitable but preferable."

This statement has to ring bells with anyone in Hong Kong. We live with some of the highest population densities in the world. Yet most of the tower blocks that crowd Mong Kok, Tsim Sha Tsui and Sheung Wan are brutal to look at and unpleasant to live in.

MVRDV believes Hong Kong can do better and its track record suggests it has the ideas to get the job done. When a Rotterdam couple wanted to extend their top-floor flat, MVRDV built them a rooftop village with three houses in the same shade of bright blue they use for their architectural models. The structure is a perfect example of MVRDV's belief that existing spaces must work harder if cities are to survive current rates of population growth. Density is a fact of life, the issue is how we deal with it and survive.

This is MVRDV's obsession and has been ever since the company was created by Winy Maas, van Rijs and Nathalie de Vries in 1991 (the trio's initials were used to create the company's name). When I met Maas and van Rijs in September they had just begun to develop a strategy for MVRDV's appearance at Hong Kong's Business of Design week, which takes place early next month. The working title for its presentation is Fantasies for Hong Kong and includes a plan to build what the maverick company calls a "flat skyscraper" with three tubular cities stretched from a single point in West Kowloon to three "landing points" between Sheung Wan and Central. The buildings would include mixed-income flats, parks and markets.

"It would be very different from the other high-rise buildings," says Maas. "It would give Hong Kong something special and would lead to an enormously symbolic connection between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon."

A look at MVRDV's past shows it's capable of getting its madcap ideas turned into steel and concrete. In Madrid, in 2004, it was asked to design a large apartment building for a housing estate already littered with inhuman, humourless slabs. The company designed a conventional rectangular building with a courtyard in the middle and then upended it on its side, so that the open space became a skypark with views of the Guadarrama Mountains. The building, called the Mirador, is a triumph and has become a tourist destination as well as a highly desirable place to live.

A new venture for MVRDV is the Logrono Montecorvo Eco City in the Spanish province of Rioja which includes 3,000 homes. This is a social project, to provide houses for Logrono's less wealthy citizens. The firm's design confines the houses to just 10 per cent of the site, its linear form allows the development to meander through the landscape provided by two hills on the site, giving every flat views towards the city. The energy required for the site is generated entirely by a combination of solar and wind power, giving the Eco City a neutral carbon footprint. By restricting the housing to just one-tenth of the site, MVRDV has been able to build an eco-park that provides recreation, beauty and unlimited energy.

"There is a tapestry of solar cells built into the mountain," says de Vries. "This covers the hills in a golden reflection of sunlight. On top of the two hills are windmills that generate energy and act as landmarks for the development, giving residents a sense of identity."

One fears that if Logrono were in Hong Kong a developer would seize the 90 per cent of land not used for housing and slap in tower blocks with small flats and tiny windows - he wouldn't be rushing to build an eco-park. The Harbour Place development in Hung Hom is a perfect example. Seven 36-storey towers with small windows, no balconies and featureless flats rise like concrete totem poles above a six-lane highway. Despite adding features such as a swimming pool and Duravit bathroom fixtures and Siemens kitchens the complex looks like a warehouse where people will be stacked like boxes. The complex maximises density at the expense of human scale. According to MVRDV such a strategy is doomed.

"Building something on a human scale is easy," says Maas. "An inhuman environment is not created by numbers but by political and economic choices. If there is the political and economic will to build on a human scale it can be done. It seems Hong Kong does not have the will to do that."

Politics and the human will are at the heart of MVRDV projects. In this sense they are not architects concerned with form, function and aesthetics, but more like anti-architects or no-brand architects, viewing the design of a building as a way to solve social problems.

The most extreme version of this guerilla approach to architecture is MVRDV's exercises in science fiction, designed to confront us with our own terrifying future. These research projects began as brainstorming sessions involving the three partners and their young team (which now numbers 57 architects). They evolved into mind-boggling documents like KM3:Excursions on Capacities, which warns that the Earth has only 25 per cent of the resources required to support the current rate of consumption and population growth. MVRDV's answer is to maximise the amount of land left available for agriculture while building ever upward, creating "a city in which ground-zero no longer exists, where the street is replaced by simultaneous distribution and division of routes and is expanded by elevators, ramps and escalators".

If this sounds like the Mid-Levels, then it's no accident, for MVRDV has often studied the way Hong Kong deals with the extremes of its urban environment. It was in their minds when they produced MetaCity/Datatown. In this exercise MVRDV theorists imagined a self-sufficient city of 250 million people (the population of the US) set down in just 60,000 square miles (the size of Finland) and then asked what difference it would make if every resident wanted to live in a detached house, an urban tower block or a flat with a terrace. In one scenario the city's waste is recycled to build 560 ski resorts while green space is created by building one million Victoria Parks stacked up over almost 4,000 storeys.

For MVRDV, which has turned its urban fantasizing into a highly lucrative business with construction projects in nine countries including China, these exercises are not just mind games. They flow from the company's observation that megacities which sprawl in all directions - think Shenzhen - are eating up space needed to grow food, generate energy, dispose of waste (including human bodies) and take recreation.

"We need to design buildings that have a higher population density but also are easier to live in," says Maas. "That means finding ways to introduce light, productive social interaction and privacy."

In practice that means MVRDV believes space can be manufactured and nature can be created out of nothing by conjuring up landscapes on the floors of buildings and reproducing them endlessly towards the sky. And the company seeks to do this in ways that help repair the environment.

Take Liuzhou, on the mainland, on the edge of a karst-like mountain range that has become a Unesco World Heritage site, there is a limestone mine. During mining operations to extract limestone five of the mountains were cut in half. MVRDV's solution is to clad the slopes with houses.

"Our plan restores the beauty of the mountains and creates a continuous wave with the surrounding landscape," says de Vries. "The floors of the houses follow the topography of the slopes, protecting the mountains from further erosion and ensuring good views and ventilation."

The planned development is also whimsical, it has a sense of humour. This is essential to MVRDV's approach. They want humanity to use less space for housing, to accept high-density living as the only solution that leaves enough of the planet left for agriculture, manufacturing and recreation. To sell this idea, MVRDV feels it must create buildings that are fun and sustain themselves, managing their own waste disposal and generating their own energy.

"We try to avoid any kind of aesthetic element in our designs," says van Rijs. "Unlike Gehry, Zaha Hadid and others whose work is easy to recognise we do not have a strong personal style. Our approach is based on logic. We see design as a dialogue of elements."

Which makes MVRDV a radical force for change and one that's increasingly popular despite its revolutionary perspectives. It would not be wise to bet against them building a city with 50 40-storey pig farms.

And don't be surprised if one day Hong Kong has a trio of tubular cities spanning Victoria Harbour.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2008, 04:48 PM   #96
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

政府續收緊各區發展 多個項目受影響 筲箕灣區增設高度限制
8 November 2008
星島日報

城規會昨日公布修訂筲箕灣分區大綱圖圖則,全區加入高度限制,主要介乎八十米至一百九十米之間,當中舊樓密集的發展、重建區,最高建築物高度限制為一百米或一百一十五米,區內多家發展商旗下項目,包括新地筲箕灣道項目、協成行東大街項目及恒生西灣河大廈項目未來發展將受影響。

城規會昨日公布修訂筲箕灣分區大綱圖圖則,內容就筲箕灣多處地帶加入高度限制,主要介乎八十米至一百九十米之間。當中住宅帶的高限經修訂後為(主水平基準上,下同)一百米至一百九十米;其中,位於筲箕灣道和西灣河街一帶舊樓密集的發展、重建區,最高建築物高度限制為一百米或一百一十五米。另註釋亦訂明住宅甲類用地地積比由六倍至十倍不等。

佔地400米獲准增高20米

城規會指,為配合把面積較細的土地合併發展,佔地四百方米或以上的土地的最高建築物高度將獲准增加二十米。區內多家發展商,包括新地、協成行、英皇、褔利置業、信和及恒生等均持有發展項目,料新地筲箕灣道項目、協成行東大街項目及恒生西灣河大廈項目未來發展將受影響。

事實上,不少發展商在該區內舊樓一帶,持有項目,包括褔利置業持有的筲箕灣道一百七十五至一百七十九號褔仁大廈,其中新地持有的筲箕灣道二百九十五至三百零五號,高限為一百一十五米,由於地盤在四百方米或以上,故此該物業高限可增加一百三十五米。而協成行旗下的筲箕灣東大街二十一至二十七號的發展項目,高度限制在一百米,該地盤面積約六千五百方呎,故高限可再增二十米。

影響新發展項目市值

此外,由恒生銀行持有位於筲箕灣道一百七十一號的恒生西灣河大廈,修訂為「住宅甲類(二)」,高限為一百米,據了解,由於地盤在四百方米或以上,故此該物業高限可增加一百二十米;該物業早前曾以公開招標形式出售,惟投標者出售未達標,故物業最終被收回。預料三項目筲箕灣圖則修訂後將對物業市值購成影響。

不過,亦有不少發展商項目,由於早前已獲批圖則及規劃申請等,若未來發展方案不作出大幅改動,則不受是次加入高限影響,包括國森集團及相關人士持有的筲箕灣道一百四十七號至一百五十九號項目,於上月份獲圖則,一幢三十層高的住宅,另加住客會所。涉及住宅樓面約四萬二千七百二十八方呎,而非住宅樓面約一萬五千二百零八方呎。現被城規會高限設在一百米之內,由於地盤較大,故高限可增加至一百二十米。

早前獲批圖則物業不受限制

至於英皇持有西灣河成安街十八至二十八號,高限設在一百一十五之內,該地盤面積約四千三百方呎,高限可提升至一百三十五米,早前獲批可建一幢樓高二十六至二十七層高的商廈,總樓面約四萬五千方呎,預估於最快於一一至一二年建成。

近年有不少港島區私有地皮被發展商申請改建成酒店,當中包括信和筲箕灣興民街海天廣場項目,亦於本年上半年度獲批可建一座二十三層高的酒店。該項目現修訂為高限為一百米。該地皮面積約七千八百一十八方呎,並以十四點五地積比發展,樓面面積逾十一萬方呎,落成後將提供二百九十二個房間。

另由房協及市建局合作的南安街重建項目亦不能倖免,加入高限發展。至於住宅甲類項目獲修訂外,城規會亦把明華大廈的一幅偌大地皮,改劃為綜合發展區,該地高限為一百米至一百二十米之間;同時劃出一列土地改作非建築帶之用。
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 12th, 2008, 07:04 PM   #97
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

黃 泥 涌 放 寬 高 限 六 新 意 見 初 步 否 決


(星島日報報道)城規會早前計畫在黃泥涌分區大綱圖加入高限,現規劃署再就個別人士提出的六份進一步申述意見進行初步審議,惟全數不獲支持。最終結果將於本周五公布。

在六份申述意見中,意見普遍反對在黃泥涌區加入高限,並要求放寬中華基督教會香港閩南堂高限至一百米(主水平基準,下同)。規劃署解釋,在黃泥涌分區大綱圖加入高限已考慮多方面因素,並且已權衡大眾追求更好生活環境以及私人發展的權益,因此高限並不會為該區帶來視野、交通以及空氣流通的影響。規劃署續指,對於在中華基督教會香港閩南堂以及馬會會所加入高限,未會對周邊環境帶來影響。

對於有意見表示支持放寬修訂項目F至H的最高高限,並同時要
求放寬一部分養和醫院的高限至一百一十五米或一百三十米高。規劃署指出,若欠缺充足的理由放寬高限,將會立下不良先例,最終會導致過高的政府、機構及社區建築物出現,使黃泥涌的休憩空間以及環境視野逐漸失去。規劃署指出,若放寬至申請高度,將與周邊的建築物不相符,故六份申述初步不獲規劃署支持,最終審議結果將於本周五公布。

2008-11-12
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 17th, 2008, 01:49 PM   #98
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

Development rethink to let fresh air into city
17 November 2008
South China Morning Post

Improving quality of life is one of the keys to Hong Kong's continued success. The government well knows that changing property developers' ways is central to achieving this aim. The so-called wall effect and canyons created by cheek-by-jowl buildings are synonymous with our city, but also make our environment uncomfortable. It is therefore good that authorities are considering significant changes to the present system.

Land being a premium has naturally meant that developers have done their utmost to maximise its potential. Scarcity means high values which translate into economic considerations being foremost when sites are planned. As a result, buildings with little or no space between them line the waterfront and hillsides. The views are spectacular, but for those at street level, the lack of air circulation and sunlight can be stifling, especially in the humid months of summer and when pollution is high.

As we report today, a public consultation could start as early as next month to look at a vastly different development approach. Among proposals are that only 70 per cent of the length of a site can be used, ensuring better air flow between buildings, and that 30 per cent of the total area be set aside for greenery. Such a model seems on its face to be a much-needed breath of fresh air for our city, but it needs to be carefully considered. A balance has to be found to ensure that developers are not overly jeopardised; height restrictions of buildings may have to be relaxed to compensate for area densities being lessened.

There is significant reason for a rethink. Developers who presently voluntarily add green features like podium gardens to buildings are given incentives such as extra floor area. This has not always been conducive to improving the environment. There are cases of the system having been abused, to the detriment of the community.

The government is to be commended for taking environmental concerns firmly on board and pushing ahead with finding a better system. If Hong Kong is to flourish and thrive, we have to improve living standards. But developers have to be listened to and rules made flexible. With care and forethought, the mistakes of the past can be avoided.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2008, 12:50 PM   #99
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,404
Likes (Received): 25

RTHK News:
Wall effect reduced along West Rail
__________________
A Hong Kong Guy who was born in HK!
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2008, 06:41 PM   #100
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17811

MTR not worried by 'wall effect' move
20 November 2008
Hong Kong Standard

MTR Corp (0066) said a government move intended to avoid "wall effects'' by property developments above West Rail stations at Nam Cheong and Yuen Long will not affect its revenue.

"The property development projects are owned by West Rail,'' MTRC property director Thomas Ho Hang- kwong said yesterday. "We only act as an agent for the projects. The revenue is not directly linked to us.''

He also said the projects have not yet been approved by the Legislative Council and the Town Planning Board, though it was anticipated they would be up for tender next year or in 2010. And he would not speculate on how the government's move to limit the two developments and so improve air flow might affect responses in the tendering process.

At Nam Cheong station, the Development Bureau proposes cutting one residential and one office tower from the scheme, reducing the gross floor area of the project by 18 percent to 303,107 square meters. High-rise residential blocks will be lowered by as much as 14.8 meters, reducing a 52-story building to 46.

In Yuen Long, plans are to cut two residential blocks. The gross floor area will be reduced by 15 percent to 136,362 sqm and height by three to 10.9 meters, meaning a proposed 47-story building will be no more than 44.

Secretary for Development Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet- ngor was also talking about the revisions yesterday, saying planners have not estimated the reduction of income because of the changes. But the government had to strike a balance between public concern and housing supply.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
hong kong

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu