daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 26th, 2010, 07:56 PM   #141
Ushiro
Noblesse oblige.
 
Ushiro's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Goyßz, Kingdom of Pequi.
Posts: 1,329
Likes (Received): 82

This happens in a city in Brazil...
I just can't remember what city...
Ushiro no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 19th, 2010, 04:56 PM   #142
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,929
Likes (Received): 18195

Developers face less room to move in new proposals
28 June 2010
The Standard

The halcyon days for developers may be fast coming to an end, with a top advisory body proposing 51 rules to restrict their room to exploit floor-area concessions for ``green'' features.

The Council for Sustainable Development's proposals _ the product of a year-long consultation that attracted 1,100 submissions, including 347 from individuals _ come fast on the heels of the government's tightening of pre-sales regulations earlier this year.

But chairman Bernard Chan Charnwut was forced to deny that the council's refusal to propose a specific cap was due to fear of developers. ``It's the government's job is to work out the percentage,'' he said.

``Our role is to collect public views.''

The council also wants concessions on gross floor areas, implemented in 2001, to be cut for a whole slew of other features, from podium gardens, balconies, mailbox areas, clubhouses, guardrooms, etc, that are now regarded as indispensable for housing estates.

Another sticking point for critics and a swath of the public is that developers pay no premium or next to nothing for these enhancements and include them in the floor area for which home buyers pay market price.

Opponents of the measures say the environmental effect of the concessions have been nullified by the growing density of housing estates, leading to the so-called ``wall effect,'' as developers go all out to cash in on them.


Pressure group Green Sense said the proposals fail to address public demands, and the absence of a specific cap was disappointing.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 12:08 PM   #143
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,929
Likes (Received): 18195

Wall-fear protesters want tower scrapped
The Standard
Monday, August 02, 2010

More than 100 Mei Foo Sun Chuen residents are demanding a halt to the construction of a 30-story tower block which they claim will block sunlight, impede airflow and create a wall effect.

They also claim the project by Cheung Tat Development stands a mere 70 centimeters from the nearest block.

The residents and a green group yesterday held a demonstration at the construction site which is surrounded on three sides by 500 flats of Mei Foo Sun Chuen Phase Eight.

Green Sense president Roy Tam Hoi-pong said the high-rise will create a wall effect and seriously affect air movement and block sunlight.

"It is shameful that a local developer has decided to build a block only 70 centimeters from another apartment's balcony. They did it legally, but absolutely without social responsibility," Tam said.

In 2002, Cheung Tat won a court battle against the Building Department, allowing it to develop the site.

Mei Foo Sun Chuen, with 99 tower blocks, is one of the largest private housing developments in Hong Kong.

Chan Chun-pong, who two years ago moved into a flat on the second floor with his wife and two children, said: "We expect it will not only be visually intrusive, it will block the sunlight from our flat. We'll not be able to hang our clothes or put plants on the balcony in the future."

The new block will be 10 stories higher than the surrounding flats.

The site was originally used for petroleum storage by Mobil and New World Development. This facility was relocated in 1997.

A year later the 14,500-square-foot site was sold to Cheung Tat.

The developer also bought the land surrounding the site - three pedestrian lanes and one road.

The construction is due to be completed in 2013 and piling will begin next Monday, according to information provided by Cheung Tat to residents.

"If the developer insists on commencing construction work, we will lie on the main road to block pile-drivers from entering the site," said Yip Siu-chau, the convener of a concern group.

The group has been protesting against the project for more than a year but Cheung Tat has so far not responded.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2010, 05:09 PM   #144
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,929
Likes (Received): 18195

Sceptics size up loopholes in new flat rules
21 October 2010
SCMP

A drive to make it harder for developers to add green features and facilities to artificially inflate flat sizes does not go far enough, say architectural professionals.

A number of loopholes will, for instance, mean the city is likely to see apartments with thick glass exterior walls that can be included as part of the saleable area.

Intrusive podiums with car parking space above MTR stations will also still exist unless the Transport and Housing Bureau issues new guidelines to remove them.

Professionals anticipate that the new policy will have little effect in reducing the city's wall effect generated from massive developments.

Exterior walls made of glass and steel, known as curtain walls, were initially designed for commercial buildings but residential designs have increasingly used them in recent years, including the much criticised Queen's Cube project in Wan Chai. But curtain walls - which are 30cm thick and can account for 20 square feet of a flat's saleable area - have not been covered by the new policy announced in last week's policy address.

The new policy states that most green features and amenity facilities should not exceed 10 per cent of a development's total gross floor area to minimise wall effect.

While developers will still be given bonus floor areas for building a curtain wall, they can sell the wall areas to buyers to make lucrative profits - valued at HK$290,000 in the worst case scenario of Queen's Cube given it is sold at HK$14,888 per sq ft.

"Flats with curtain walls may consume more energy as they allow more sunlight in and windows can seldom be opened fully," Hong Kong Green Building Council director Wong Kam-sing said. "It deserves a study to see whether it should be encouraged in residential projects."

Glass-wall designs have become popular in redevelopment projects and new luxury flats, among them: Queen's Cube in Wan Chai, The Oakhill in Happy Valley, Gramercy on Caine Road, Lime Stardom in Tai Kok Tsui, Forfar in Kowloon Tong, The Cullinan in West Kowloon and Hill Paramount in Sha Tin.

Existing policies do not require developers to use glass that effectively filters sunlight. A curtain wall can also exist in any orientation of a building, even if it faces west - a direction that receives most sunlight. It is also stated in land sales conditions that a curtain wall can be exempted from gross floor area calculation. In the case of Queen's Cube, the curtain wall areas account for six to 20 square feet of flats that are sized from 275 sq ft to 307 sq ft in terms of saleable area - which also covers wall, balconies and utility platforms. The redevelopment project, by the Urban Renewal Authority and Nan Fung Group, has been criticised for producing small but expensive flats. The efficiency ratio of the flats - dividing saleable area by gross floor area - is also low.

Because of the large amount of common areas apportioned to a flat, which accounts for 46 per cent of a flat's saleable area, the efficiency ratio only reaches 68 per cent. It will be further reduced to 59 per cent if balconies and utility platforms are excluded from saleable area. The developer did not give an exhaustive list of the common areas apportioned to a flat, but some examples include pump rooms, lift machine rooms, lift and entrance lobbies.

But the trend might change under the new policy to take effect in April, vice-president of the Hong Kong Institute of Urban Design Vincent Ng Wing-shun said. "Architects will be asked to put more facilities inside flats rather than outside, especially inside duplex flats on top floors."

But those necessary but non value-added facilities like pipe ducts, covered walkways and wind catchers that enhance ventilation will be given less space, which might give rise to maintenance problems and a less-friendly pedestrian environment.

Another question mark over the new policy is the government's determination to remove car parks above MTR stations, which hinges on a review by the Transport Department.

A spokeswoman for Development Bureau said the Buildings Department has commissioned a study, covering curtain walls, to look at energy efficiency of building designs. She said the bureau will consider adjusting the policy to cover curtain walls based on the study's findings. The bureau said a comprehensive review of the density on outline zoning plans will be done at a later stage.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 21st, 2011, 03:59 PM   #145
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,929
Likes (Received): 18195

Greenery cools concrete jungle
1 November 2010
South China Morning Post

The ultimate green office is likely to be a virtual one - and the prospect of more companies striving to reduce their carbon footprint will be a welcome prospect for serviced office providers.

Some business centre owners in the United States have resorted to calculating reductions in carbon emissions made by companies that use their offices. One report, circulated by The McLeland Group, trumpeted a 94 per cent drop when a virtual office was used rather than a shared physical space. The results usually contribute to an alluring marketing campaign, as working in an office takes a toll on the environment with greater vehicle use. This places a strain on scarce resources, such as water and energy, and encourages development that can swallow open spaces.

While the virtual office is being increasingly used by companies and sole traders, who rely on a prestige address and exclusive phone line based in the central business district as they travel or work from home, physical locations are becoming more environmentally friendly.

Hong Kong is not the only city said to have suffered from heightened heat induced by the "wall effect" of rows of tall buildings that prevent air circulation. Greenery has been laid atop office towers in Chicago to create about four million sqft of gardens aimed at cooling the concrete jungle during summer. Similar methods have been adopted in Europe and, while the scientific benefits may be debatable, the aesthetic qualities are more pleasing.

While limited space, utility equipment and machine rooms on top of many office buildings in Hong Kong prevent landscape gardening on an impressive scale, big developers are at least seeing the benefits of factoring greenery into buildings.

One example is Sino's Exchange Tower in Kowloon Bay that lays claim to be the first office building in Hong Kong with a green balcony on each floor. The building also includes "podium garden" restaurants on its second floor and a sky garden on the 15th floor that is used for staff meetings, lunches and social gatherings.

Yet, despite such efforts and the heralding of greener credentials, eco-friendly fixtures and fittings are still hard to find, particularly when offices are being refurbished on a tight budget. According to a report by property industry magazine RFP, organisations flush with cash - such as government projects, big law firms and banks - are driving the demand for green building products.

More institutions are also eager to gain Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification, which is the world standard for green buildings and may raise their standing among environmentally conscious investors.

Industry watchers say the good news for the green lobby is that mainland developers are also aiming for greener buildings when it comes to office development. But it all comes down to planning to ensure budgets and project deadlines can ensure offices can be made nearly as green as the green, green grass of home.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 11th, 2011, 05:56 PM   #146
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,929
Likes (Received): 18195

Marchers aim to turn up heat on property giants
The Standard
Wednesday, May 11, 2011

About 1,000 environmental activists, students and frustrated homeowners will hold a protest march against property developers they blame for sky-rocketing flat prices and "wall buildings".

Specially targeted in the protest on Sunday will be the MTR Corp and the developer of the controversial high-rise project in Mei Foo Sun Chuen.

The protest co-organized by Green Sense and the Civic Party, will start from Chater Garden at 3pm, heading for the central government liaison office.

Green Sense president Roy Tam Hoi- pong said: "Some property developers are behind wall buildings that have a negative impact on the surrounding environment. Besides, small businesses cannot afford to rent stores in those malls owned by the MTR."

Tam said the public is suffering from high property prices and criticized the government for not doing enough to cool the market.

Yuen Long district councillor Lee Yuet-man, who will join the protest, said the MTRC planned to build four 40-story residential blocks above the Light Rail Tin Wing Stop in Tin Shui Wai, the so- called "City of Tears" for its high levels of unemployment and despair.

Lee said if the blocks are built, they will create a wall effect that will significantly change the air flow and wind speed in the area.

"There are four schools near the proposed site. I am worried the blocks will affect the students' learning environment," he said.

His view is shared by the Hong Kong Professional Teachers' Union.

Union executive committee member Billy Leung Tak-yin teaches in one of the schools.

Leung said his students have told him they are worried temperatures within Tin Shui Wai will rise because of the proposed blocks.

"The MTR has not consulted the residents and students about the plan," he said.


Tam added that Mei Foo Sun Chuen residents will also be at the march.

They are against a plan by developer Cheung Tat to build a 20-story block in Phase 8 on a site purchased from New World Development.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 6th, 2012, 01:25 AM   #147
jar_007
bezrobotny
 
jar_007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: bezdomny
Posts: 7,100
Likes (Received): 3305

del
__________________
Jeśli piszesz do mnie, używaj proszę polskich znakˇw i interpunkcji. Jeśli Ci się nie chce, to mi nie będzie się chciało tego czytać.
Ignorowani: lewandovski, nikmin, spirytus, Urbanista1, r6666, ixs. Kandydaci:demoos, mitch_ducanon
Nie ma tak złej architektury, żeby drzewa jej nie pomogły.
Nie ma też tak dobrej żeby jej zaszkodziły.

Last edited by jar_007; January 6th, 2012 at 01:35 AM.
jar_007 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
hong kong

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium