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Old October 17th, 2007, 05:26 AM   #61
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Filipino martial arts, escrima, gets noticed in hands of a master

As Carlito Bonjoc Jr. gets his arms going, it's best to get out of the way. Like way out of the way.

The blur of hands wielding wide, stocky knives interspersed with flashes of reflected sunlight is a hypnotic, fluid movement. It's a bit like watching a finely choreographed dance.

But what Bonjoc is demonstrating is the little-known Philippine martial art of escrima. The other difference: He does it from the seat of his wheelchair or with the aid of crutches.

The 46-year-old escrima master was born with spina bifida, a congenital spinal cord defect that can affect the lower body and result in paralysis, yet he doesn't tolerate pity.

"There are so many people out there that have physical challenges," says Bonjoc, whose calm composure contrasts sharply with the intensity of his gaze. "Some are born with it; we're the lucky ones because this is what we grew up with. We learned to deal with this early. Now, with the reality of war, we have a lot of young people that come back from the war with some of their body parts missing, or some get in a car accident and lose a limb or become paralyzed, and those are harder to take because they had all their physical abilities growing up and then all of a sudden it was taken from them. That must be much harder than what I had."

Bonjoc was born on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao and immigrated to Stockton when he was 9. At school, bullies picked on him because of his physical condition - "kids would hit me and then take off running because they knew I couldn't chase after them" - and his difficulty with English. When he was in college, he lost his right leg to infection.

Escrima, he says, is what gave him the confidence to stop the bullying, though it didn't start out that way.

"I wanted to get even," says Bonjoc. "When I was younger, I used to get frustrated, and all somebody had to say was that word, 'cripple,' and the next thing I know, I'm swinging. All the martial arts goes out the window, and I'm just swinging. But over the years, because of the discipline I gained from the martial arts training, I got away from all that. I didn't have to be vengeful."

The way Bonjoc learned escrima is typical of how the martial art form developed: passed down from father to child in an oral tradition. It's because of this lack of early documentation that the origins of escrima, and its aliases (eskrima, arnis and kali), can vary from Indonesian martial arts to Chinese mariners to Spanish conquistadors. What is clear, however, is that a centuries-old fighting style did develop before Spanish colonialism, and it was indigenous to the Philippines.

Bonjoc says escrima is most notable for its ability to use the same fighting moves either with or without a weapon and for the weapons themselves. There are only two types: sticks and knives.

Bonjoc is a fourth-generation escrima master who's traveled the world as a guru as well as on the tournament circuit. His family's system, Cadiz Lapu-Lapu, is named in honor of Bonjoc's great-grandfather, who settled the town of Cadiz, and Chief Lapulapu, the Philippine hero who killed Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan.

Cadiz Lapu-Lapu is just one of many styles. Considering that the Philippines is a nation of 7,100 islands, and that villages developed their own ways to defend themselves that they then handed down, there are innumerable escrima systems.

Though he has his own school in Stockton, Mata sa Bagyo (or Eye of the Storm), he travels to San Jose's De Anza Park every other Sunday to help a buddy teach escrima. It's only fitting that Bonjoc chose October, which is Filipino American History Month, to focus on promoting escrima.

"It's handed down from generation to generation, and if we don't continue to do that, it will be lost."

He's getting a boost from mainstream media as well: the History Channel's "Human Weapon" recently devoted an episode to escrima. The show's Web site also lists escrima along with Muay Thai and judo under its martial art disciplines.

TV and YouTube won't be the only places to see escrima, though. Bonjoc's dream is to form a nonprofit and travel the nation as a motivational speaker with a team of disabled martial artists.

"I'm here to help educate people not just about the Filipino culture and the Filipino martial arts culture, but also to understand that we all have differences and just because somebody is different from you physically or mentally, that doesn't mean that person is not a human being.

"That person has a worth, and they have creativity, and if you just look close enough, you will see that and you will see that person for who he is."
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Old October 21st, 2007, 07:48 AM   #62
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Thanks for the great article... I think the new movie 100% Full or is it 1% Full is a movie about FMA... I'll try to check on that.
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Old December 13th, 2007, 06:11 AM   #63
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Hi guys..dont know where to post this question thats why i tried creating a different martial arts thread..but not FMA though...so mejo redundant yung ginawa ko

uhmm may alam ba kayo na center sa Metro Manila specifically sa Ortigas Makati area that offers lessons for Aikido or Taekwondo? thnx.
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Old March 13th, 2008, 04:22 PM   #64
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Indigenous Filipino Toys and Games

Remember playing these toys/games?

-Patintero
-Piko
-Tumbang Preso
-Taguan
-Sungka
-Dama
-Trumpo
-Saranggola
-Sipa
-Holen
-Yoyo
-Luksong Dangkal/Tinik/Baka/Lubid

Do Filipino children still play them? Or are they now part of the past that is slowly being forgotten and is fading from Philippine society's consciousness. Here's a website that cites the description and rules of these once beloved games for so many generations of Filipinos. I hope that these traditional games are still being played despite the rapid advancement in technology to amuse, entertain, and occupy kids these days.
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Last edited by kiretoce; March 13th, 2008 at 04:34 PM.
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Old March 13th, 2008, 04:23 PM   #65
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Games Lolo and Lola Played

Do you know that our lolos (grandfathers) and lolas (grandmothers) played low-cost, if not no cost at all, but nonetheless fun-filled games during their days of youth?

Very much unlike in the present generation where the in-things are text-messaging, Internet chat, video games and slot machines which require some fortune or extra money to avail of them, the games of Lolo and Lola were often improvisations and less complicated. All it took them were a few scrap materials and a little imagination.

My lolo told me that they had games and sports for various ages, for every change of season or weather condition, and for varied desired outcomes.

"During summer when it's sunshiny all day, we used the kalye (street) as our sports center," Lolo Pianong reminisced. "Wala pang Araneta Coliseum, Ultra, Astrodome, Rizal Memorial, gymnasium noon. Naglalaro kami nang walang gastusan ng patintero, piko, tumbang preso, o taguang pong." (There were no Araneta Coliseum, Ultra, Astrodome, Rizal Memorial, gymnasium yet before. We played free of expense, patintero, piko, tumbang preso, or hide and seek.)

True, patintero, for instance, only requires an improvised drawing of boxes and lines on the ground with the use of chalk, charcoal, or sand. The objective of a team is to accumulate as many points by crossing the lines without being tagged by the opposing team stepping on/ and moving along the lines only.

"I posted the most number of points because your lola and her team could not tag me," Lolo Pianong bragged. "But later when we were of age already, she tagged me for an altar date."

"Your lolo fell in love with me because I was the piko queen during our childhood days," Lola Juana countered. "Laging talo siya kaya napikon at niligawan ako para gumanti." (He always lost so he got peeved and courted me to exact vengeance.)

The purpose of the game, I was told, is to win a place to call one's own. Every player has a pamato (hitting object such as a flat stone, a brick chip or any substitute flat and circular object). It is played within connecting box figures drawn on the floor with chalk or charcoal. The player throws the pamato inside each box, steps inside the other boxes, picks up the pamato, then step back to the base line.

Another very common game when my lolo and lola were young is the tumbang preso. Equipment needed are an empty milk or sardine can and a slipper or piece of flat stone for pamato to hit the can. Nine participants form a circle, the taya, an "it" stands at center near the standing can, who quickly puts up the can when hit, then attempts to tag any of the nine players.

According to my lola, a favorite indoor game of the girls is the sungka. It is played on a sungka board of solid wood carved like a shallow boat. At both ends of the board are large deep bowls and between them are seven pairs of shallower bowls. Each bowl contains seven pebbles or sigay (puka) shells, or dried fruit seeds. Two players start the game by simultaneously scooping up the pebbles in one of the shallow bowls and dropping a piece in each of the other bowls towards their assigned base. The player whose last pebble in hand falls in an empty bowl stops while the player whose last pebble drops in another bowl with contents scooping them up, and he or she is privileged to continue the process. When all the pebbles will have been deposited in the base bowls, the player with unfilled smaller bowls is the loser and is called nasunugan(burned).

"While the girls delighted with the sungka, we boys preferred dama which is a board game," my lolo explained. "The simplest version is the board with only three pawns for each of the two players. They attempt to outmaneuver their pawns on a square board with four lines intersecting at dead center. The first one to form his pawns in a straight line wins. "Damais played at any instant because it requires very little preparation."

There were a variety of hurdle games during my lolo and lola's childhood years. The luksong dangkal needs no material. The "it" simply sits down with his buttock on the floor and one leg is folded with the knee up. The players jump over. Next round, one hand with outstretched fingers is added on top of the knee, and the players jump again. The other hand follows next. The player who touches the obstacle becomes it or is eliminated. Other variations are luksong tinik (hurdle over a stick), luksong baka (hurdle over the back), luksong lubid (hurdle over a rope or jumping rope), and luksong bilangan (counted hurdle).

My lolo was adept at playing the trumpo (top). It is an egg-shaped wooden carving with a metal tip where a yard-long cord is wound. The top is unleashed to the ground. The object of the game is to stop the target spinning top from a distance of 15 feet with the thrower's own top. If the target spins longer than the thrower's, the target's owner wins.

Saranggolaan or kite flying was an all-time favorite during the yesteryears especially when the afternoon was breezy. Again, my lolo confided to me that when he was a gradeschooler, his favorite game after classes was the boka-boka, a frameless kite out of a sheet of pad or bond paper with two edges folded some two inches. "This was my way of disposing of my test papers with low marks," he laughed. The more artistic kite is the gurion.

Some of the original Filipino games are still played during fiestas, school or organization anniversaries, and community celebrations like the Santacruzan in May. The more enduring fun games include pabitin (a hanging bamboo trellis with dangling goodies up for grabs by merrymakers), basag palayok (hitting the pot full of goodies), palo sebo(greasy bamboo pole climbing with a bounty at the peak), and basag itlog (breaking the egg).

With the advent of electronics and computerization, these indigenous Filipino games have become seemingly out of this world and considered baduy or "low class" by the present generation. Ironically, some of these games have been adopted by other countries but the fact that these originated in the Philippines has been obliterated into oblivion.

Perhaps only few of us know that the yoyo originated here in the Philippines. It started out as a hunting weapon by our forefathers to maim their animal prey. It was later reduced to size and became a toy for the youngsters.

Our forefathers, too, had a number of martial arts that could compare with the Chinese Kung Fu, Japanese Judo, Korean Tae Kwon Do.

The Filipino arnis has become so popular in other countries to the extent that the fact that it is an original Pinoy martial art has been almost forgotten. While arnis is recognized abroad as a global Filipino identity, it is hardly known or appreciated locally. Historical accounts have it that during the fateful Battle of Mactan on March 16, 1521, Filipino chieftain Lapulapu and his inferiorly equipped warriors used arnis aside with their kris to ward off the Spanish invaders led by Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan. Further, trained in unarm combat, the native defenders pinned down the intruders within the use of dumog, a ground fighting or wrestling technique, to finish the standing battle.

But hopes for the return to our indigenous games and sports have not been completely dashed.

Every Sunday since June, 1998, the Philippine Indigenous Games and Sports Savers Association Incorporated, in a nationalistic effort to promote local games, has been conducting shows, competitions, exhibits, demonstrations, free instructional courses and clinics, in cooperation with the National Parks and Development Committee. Initial venue is the Agrifina Circle now called Teodoro F. Valencia Circle, at Rizal Park, from 1:00 to 6:00 P.M. Eventually the whole Rizal Park will be the playing area for indigenous games simultaneously being played.

PIGSSAI (sounds like the vernacular for boil) president Engr. Jose Dion D. Diaz, Jr., who is Deputy General Manager for Infrastructure of the Philippine Tourism Authority, says that this non-government organization has forged ties with the Philippine Sports Commission, the Philippine Olympic Committee, Rotary Clubs, other government agencies like the PTA, DOT, and NPDC, and educational institutions in all levels. Itself affiliated with the Federation of Indigenous Games and Sports Association International, PIGSSAI's number of affiliates has snowballed to over 100 members affiliate clubs, federations, and schools.

Diaz says that public response, including media, has been very heartening. In fact, no less than the Asusasyon ng Kumentarista at Anawnser ng Pilipinas, a national association of radio broadcasters, has recently bestowed PIGSSA the Millennium Award as the "Most Outstanding NGO 2000." Diaz, as president of PIGSSAI, accepted the Millennium Award "in recognition of his invaluable service and contribution to the total upliftment of the indigenous sports in the Philippines, thus contributing to its development."

The movement has not only awakened national consciousness of indigenous games but also attracted even foreign martial enthusiasts. Actually, the Sunday exhibitions have the makings of a regular tourist attraction at the Rizal Park. It is seen to be a major step towards the promotion of Philippine Sports Tourism.

Meanwhile, PIGSSAI is continuously doing research work and at the same time using multi-media to propagate indigenous games as an interesting aspect of Philippine heritage. In its list of Filipino indigenous games and sports, there are no less than 60 of them, together with 10 martial arts of Filipino origin, notably arnis, dumog, sikaran, Muslim-kuntaw, and JENDO.

PIGSSAI's listing has been clustered into fiesta games, object games, foot games, palakasan (test of strength), pabilisan (test of speed), hurdle games, card games, street games, board games, finger games, and other unclassified ones.

Most of these were played by my lolo and lola with hardly any expense at all, seemingly corroborating the axiom "the best things in life are free." So if you have no means to avail of a cellphone for text-messaging, computer for chatting, playstations and arcade games, why not return to the native indigenous games and sports?

Libre na, masaya pa! (Already free, still fun-filled!)
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Old March 13th, 2008, 04:29 PM   #66
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Hi Kimber, you entered Saranggola twice. And btw, isn't flying kites originally done by the Chinese?
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Old March 13th, 2008, 04:36 PM   #67
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Oops! Thanks Sinjin! I think we have our very own version of kites that we used for kite flying. Like those ones used in traditional "kite fighting" games/competitions.
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Old March 13th, 2008, 04:51 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kiretoce View Post
Remember playing these toys/games?

-Patintero
-Piko
-Tumbang Preso
-Taguan
-Sungka
-Dama
-Trumpo
-Saranggola
-Sipa
-Holen
-Yoyo
-Luksong Dangkal/Tinik/Baka/Lubid

Do Filipino children still play them? Or are they now part of the past that is slowly being forgotten and is fading from Philippine society's consciousness. Here's a website that cites the description and rules of these once beloved games for so many generations of Filipinos. I hope that these traditional games are still being played despite the rapid advancement in technology to amuse, entertain, and occupy kids these days.
I used to play all of them, except for sipa wasn't really good at it,..but then thinking about how many kids were so good at it, would probably mean that we might actually be better at football than basketball if we could only focus more on that field...

oh and kimber you forgot hawakang bakal and moro-moro...
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Old March 13th, 2008, 05:01 PM   #69
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Yup, I agree about the correlation between sipa and the sport of football/soccer.

What's Hawakang Bakal (metal holding?) and Moro-Moro (Pinoy version of "Cowboys and Indians")?
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Old March 13th, 2008, 05:08 PM   #70
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hawakang bakal is like Tag, except if you're holding unto iron you can't be touched...

I don't know what cowboys and indians is , but maybe they're the same... Moro-moro is a group game, each group would have a base, the goal is to capture the base by touching it or capturing all the players in the opposing team..( via tag, the person who can catch you is the one who touched his own base the last) that's basically it..
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Old March 14th, 2008, 01:40 PM   #71
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langit lupa? text? touching?(tatsing) chinse garter? yung homemade na trolley? jackstone?
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Old March 15th, 2008, 01:26 AM   #72
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Old March 15th, 2008, 01:51 AM   #73
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Old March 15th, 2008, 02:46 AM   #74
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Tex as in Card Tex
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Old March 15th, 2008, 05:13 AM   #75
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Piko is drived from hop-scotch, di ba?

I haven't seen patintero played anywhere but the Philippines and my son's school dito sa States. He taught it to his schoolmates and it's called Pat-n-Tear now. Kinda amusing...
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Old March 15th, 2008, 07:41 AM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kiretoce View Post
Remember playing these toys/games?

-Patintero
-Piko
-Tumbang Preso
-Taguan
-Sungka
-Dama
-Trumpo
-Saranggola
-Sipa
-Holen
-Yoyo
-Luksong Dangkal/Tinik/Baka/Lubid

Do Filipino children still play them? Or are they now part of the past that is slowly being forgotten and is fading from Philippine society's consciousness. Here's a website that cites the description and rules of these once beloved games for so many generations of Filipinos. I hope that these traditional games are still being played despite the rapid advancement in technology to amuse, entertain, and occupy kids these days.
uy, you forgot syato, ten-twenty, and chinese garter.

at least in the street where i live, there are kids who still play these or have games like these. modified na nga lang to their favorite TV shows or kung ano mang uso ngayon. i like it that kids still run around the street. way better than staying in front of the TV all day with only the fingers moving.

i used to play them except for sipa and trumpo (only the boys played them) and luksong baka/dangkal/tinik/lubid. hindi kasi ako mataas tumalon, matataya lang ako. I was pretty good at dama and habulan, though.

btw, can someone explain the mechanics for sungka? i used to play that too but I've forgotten it now.
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Old March 15th, 2008, 08:46 AM   #77
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Origin and Rules of Philippine Sungka

Congkak is a mancala game played in the island of Borneo, Singapore, and Peninsular Malaysia. Minor variants are known as Tchonka, Naranj, Dakon or Sungka and are played in Indonesia (mostly Java), Sri Lanka, the Maldives, southern Thailand, the Philippines and the Marianas. In Indonesia, it is called "Congklak" meaning cowrie shells, which are often used as pieces.

Congkak is believed to originate from the word "congak" which in old Malay Language means count. It is believed that the game originated in Malacca Kingdom where it became very popular and spread to the South East Asia region. This spread was due to the many travelers who visited the kingdom because it was a trading city. In the early days it is thought that this game was for the king and family and the palace resident, however later it spread to the people around the kingdom. As the Congkak board is shaped like a boat it is believed that it is based on the legend, this fisherman unable to go to the sea during raining season and he loss his income during this time. To prevent him from become very bored.


Equipment

The Congkak board has fourteen holes in two sets of seven, plus an additional store for each player. Each player controls the seven holes on their side of the board, and their score is the number of seeds in their left-hand store.

The pieces are 98 undifferentiated seeds.

Setup

Seven seeds are placed in each hole except the stores, which remain empty.

Objective

The objective of the game is to capture more seeds than one's opponent.

Sowing

Players take turns moving the seeds except in the first move which is performed simultaneously. On a turn, a player chooses one of the seven holes under their control. The player removes all seeds from this hole, and distributes them in each hole clockwise from his hole, in a process called sowing. Sowing skips an opponent's store, but does not skip a player's own store.

If the last seed falls into an occupied hole, all the seeds are removed from that hole, and are sown starting from that hole. The process continues until the last seed falls into a player's store, or an empty hole.

If the last seed sown falls into a player's own store, they immediately earn another turn, which can begin at any of the seven holes under their control.

Capturing

If the last seed sown falls into an empty hole on the current player's side, then the player captures all the seeds in the hole directly across from this one, on the opponent's side. If the opposing hole is empty, no seeds are captured.
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Old March 15th, 2008, 09:45 AM   #78
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Sungka is a fun game, but you'll be distracted if you play the game with these beauties.
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Old March 15th, 2008, 10:05 AM   #79
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oh and I forgot pa nga yung bente-uno.....
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Old March 16th, 2008, 12:25 AM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle@1008 View Post
hawakang bakal is like Tag, except if you're holding unto iron you can't be touched...

I don't know what cowboys and indians is , but maybe they're the same... Moro-moro is a group game, each group would have a base, the goal is to capture the base by touching it or capturing all the players in the opposing team..( via tag, the person who can catch you is the one who touched his own base the last) that's basically it..
we call that skati in cdo. captured players can form a line so that when the opponents touch one of the captured players, they get a point

ako yata ang mvp nyan noon
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