daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation

Airports and Aviation » Airports | Photos and Videos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 16th, 2007, 07:29 PM   #1
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

MISC | Asian Aerospace Hong Kong

World’s largest civil aerospace show set for Hong Kong debut
http://www.asianaerospace.com/imgs/p...elease-Eng.pdf



HONG KONG, July 11, 2007 – Hong Kong is about to make aviation industry history when it soon plays host to what will be the world’s largest dedicated civil aerospace sector showcase.

Reed Exhibitions announced at the beginning of last year that its flagship aerospace industry event would move from Singapore, where it had been held for more than 20 years, to a new location at AsiaWorld-Expo in Hong Kong, where it will be staged from September 3-6, 2007.

Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress 2007 will be a four day exclusive business-to-business (B2B) event, featuring more than 500 participating companies from more than 20 countries, with 12 national pavilions. More than 400 delegates are expected to attend Congress opening Executive Sessions, which will feature speakers at ministerial and director general level.

The move of the show to Hong Kong comes as the Asia Pacific market is forecast by the world’s top manufacturers to account for a third of aircraft orders over the next 20 years.

Airbus and Boeing, both exhibitors at Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress 2007, respectively see the Asia Pacific market for aircraft demand growing strongly over the next 20 years, making it the number two region behind the North American market. Boeing, for example, expects the Asia Pacific region to account for 29% of all new aircraft deliveries through 2026, while by dollar value that percentage will be in excess of one third.

Annie Ma, Reed Exhibitions Vice President Asia, said the opportunities this growth will create in a variety of sectors such as airport infrastructure; maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO); and simulation and training, will all be highlighted at Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress 2007, which now encompasses the broadest range of civil aerospace services and products under one roof.

Reed Exhibitions has concentrated the focus of its premier aerospace industry event on the civil sector by bringing together complementary events through organic growth, acquisitions, and commercial collaborations.

The company has acquired the region’s leading air freight conference and exhibition, Air Freight Asia, and the world’s largest aircraft interiors show, Aircraft Interiors, which have been integrated into Asian Aerospace.

In another agreement with Halldale Media Group, Reed Exhibitions will collaborate in the next staging of the Asia Pacific Airline Training Symposium (APATS), which will be held alongside Asian Aerospace.

Nicholas Ionides, Regional Managing Editor (Asia) of Flight, the longest established brand in aviation media, which is a strategic partner in the show Congress, highlighted the significance of the Asia Pacific region; noting forecasts by the General Administration of Civil Aviation of China (CAAC), which sees domestic traffic doubling every five years, and expects at least three Chinese airlines to be among the world’s Top 10 in passenger traffic
and revenue rankings by 2020. Similar growth is expected in India, which in 2003 had four main scheduled airlines, and started this year with 14.

Annie Ma said: “We are all set to stage this historic presentation of our flagship aerospace industry event as the world’s largest dedicated civil aerospace event, which has been shaped to suit the business demands of the entire Asian region.

“This region promises to be the focus of the entire global civil aerospace supply chain for the foreseeable future, and we are pleased to have made this pioneer move of Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress to Asia’s World City in Hong Kong.

“We have embarked on a major regional and international business delegation and VIP visitor promotion programme, in collaboration with our official carrier, Cathay Pacific, and look forward to seeing all of our customers and contacts in Hong Kong this September.”

About Reed Exhibitions: The world’s leading organiser of trade and consumer exhibitions Reed Exhibitions excels in creating high profile, highly targeted business and consumer exhibitions to establish and maintain business relations, and generate new business.

Every year we run over 460 events in 38 countries, bringing together over 90,000 suppliers and more than 5.5 million buyers. With 2,300 employees in 33 offices around the globe we serve 52 industries worldwide.

Our network of offices and promoters extends to 45 countries. With more market-leading exhibitions than any other organiser, nobody delivers more business contacts than Reed Exhibitions.

For more information, please visit www.reedexpo.com.

Expo Website : http://www.asianaerospace.com/
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old August 16th, 2007, 07:30 PM   #2
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Hong Kong airshow to highlight booming Asian market

HONG KONG, July 11, 2007 (AFP) - Asia's largest airshow is to focus on commercial rather than military jets given the region's rapidly expanding passenger aeroplane market, organisers said Wednesday.

The Asian Aerospace Exhibition, which moves to Hong Kong after being staged in Singapore for more than 20 years, was entering a "new phase" with its change of emphasis, said promoter Reed Tradex.

Organiser Reed Exhibitions highlighted the huge potential of Asian markets such as India and China.

China has the world's fastest-growing airline passenger market, which is expanding by about 12.5 percent annually.

Chinese domestic air traffic is expected to double every five years and China's fleet of aircraft to quadruple in size over the next 20 years.

The firm's figures suggest the Asian market will account for a third of aircraft orders over the next 20 years, making it the number two region behind the North American market.

In 2006, the Asia-Pacific region accounted for 24 percent of the world airline market.

The airshow will take place September 3-6 at the AsiaWorld-Expo complex near Hong Kong's airport.

Some 500 companies from more than 20 countries are scheduled to participate in the event, with 10,000 trade visitors expected.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2007, 09:04 AM   #3
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

A380 World Tour continues with major airports in Asia and the U.S.
13 August 2007
Airbus Press Release

Airbus' A380 will embark for a series of demonstration tours starting on 30th August. Key airports in South-East-Asia and the U.S. will be visited.

The Asia-A380-tour will be conducted with flight-test-aircraft MSN (Manufacturer's Serial Number) 007, powered by four Rolls Royce Trend 900 engines. The world's largest and most innovative passenger jet flying today is equipped with a full passenger cabin, which can comfortably carry 520 passengers in an extra quiet and relaxing three-class cabin-environment. The International Airports to be visited are:

Thailand, Bangkok / Chiang Mai -- August 31 - September 2
Vietnam, Hanoi -- September 2-3
China, Hongkong (Asian Aerospace) -- September 3-5
Korea, Seoul -- September 5-7.

The US-tour will take the A380 flight-test-aircraft MSN009, powered by four Engine Alliance GP7200 engines, to the United States. The visits are part of the ongoing route proving process for this aircraft/engine-combination. The aircraft, which has no passenger-cabin, is on static display at the following airports:

Connecticut, Bradley International Airport (BDL) -- October 2-3
Kentucky, Cincinnati/N. Kentucky Airport (CVG) -- October 3-4
California, San Francisco International Airport (SFO) -- October 4-5.

Both demonstration tours are part of the extensive campaign to prepare the A380 for a smooth entry into service. Operating under typical airline conditions, both aircraft will undergo airport compatibility checks, ground handling and maintenance procedures to confirm its readiness to enter service. The A380 has already visited more than 45 airports and by 2011, more than 70 airports will be ready for A380 operations.

Total orders and commitments for the A380 are 173 by 14 customers. The first customer A380 will be delivered to Singapore Airlines in October. Subsequent aircraft, for delivery to Singapore Airlines, Emirates Airlines and Qantas, are also well on track.

The A380 will provide more comfort in every class and more open space for relaxation than any other aircraft. Passengers will enjoy a new way of flying while benefiting from the quietest cabin in the sky. The aircrafts‘ efficiency and advanced technologies will result in outstanding economics and higher operational flexibility as seat-mile costs are 20 percent lower and range 15 percent greater compared to today's existing large aircrafts.

Being cleaner, greener, quieter and smarter, the A380 is already setting new standards for transport and the environment. Per passenger, the A380 is as fuel efficient as a small economical family car. Requiring shorter runways for take off and landing, the A380 also provides vital extra passenger capacity without increasing the number of flights. So the aircraft is an ideal solution to today's congested airports.

Airbus is an EADS company.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2007, 06:16 PM   #4
EricIsHim
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,397
Likes (Received): 28

BDL sounds very attractive to me for a visit~~ But too bad it's on Tue and Wed.
__________________
EricIsHim
My PhotoBucket
EricIsHim no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 27th, 2007, 06:43 AM   #5
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Superjumbo low flyover planned
24 August 2007
South China Morning Post

Negotiations are under way for the new Airbus A380 superjumbo to make a spectacular low-level flight over Victoria Harbour next month.

A Civil Aviation Department spokesman said yesterday the plane would be coming to Hong Kong for the opening of the Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress on September 3.

But he said negotiations were still continuing over whether the plane would make the low-level flyover.

"Nothing is confirmed at present," the spokesman said.

The South China Morning Post understands, however, that negotiations for the flight have largely been completed and only a final rubber stamp is required for the flyover to proceed.

The low-level flight would be a first for Hong Kong and is expected to be announced within the next few days.

Government Flying Service helicopters would monitor the flight corridor as the A380 made its way down the harbour. Plans are also being made to cater to spectators and the media on the waterfront.

Sticking points in the negotiations concern the height at which the plane can fly and the time it can take.

Although the plane would have no passengers on board, another flight may take place for VIPs during the week.

The three-day Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress will be this year's largest aerospace gathering and will run at AsiaWorld-Expo until September 6. More than 500 companies will attend.

Singapore Airlines will make the first commercial flight on the double-decker, four-engined aircraft to Sydney on October 25. Flight SQ380 will then return to Singapore. A charity auction of seats on the first flight is being held on eBay.

The airline expects the superjumbo to be used frequently on Europe-Sydney routes.

Hongkongers will have a chance to fly on the Airbus A380 if they fly to Singapore and then on to Sydney on Singapore Airlines.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 27th, 2007, 02:59 PM   #6
EricIsHim
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,397
Likes (Received): 28


It's gonna be stunning and bring back the KaiTak memory for a little bit. But I would imagine the noise will also be stunning, too.
__________________
EricIsHim
My PhotoBucket
EricIsHim no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 31st, 2007, 06:45 PM   #7
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Height limit put on superjumbo flight
31 August 2007
South China Morning Post

A minimum altitude limit of 304 metres, or 1,000 feet, has been imposed on a flight across Victoria Harbour by the world's biggest passenger plane on Monday.

The limit, imposed on the Airbus A380 for safety reasons, and equivalent to about the 68th storey of the city's tallest building, Two IFC in Central, was announced by the director-general of civil aviation, Norman Lo Sung-man.

The plane, which will fly across the harbour between 8am and 8.30am, would also keep a distance of more than 548 metres from the 88-storey building, Mr Lo said.

The flight will help launch the four-day Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress at AsiaWorld-Expo near the airport, where the plane will be one of about 10 aircraft on display.

"When we design the flight path and flight profile, we are in constant and regular discussions with the Airbus flight test pilots and simulation team," Mr Lo said.

All the points for the flight path had been tested at the Airbus simulation facilities in Toulouse, France, and it was considered a safe flight path over the harbour, he added.

Weather permitting, the plane is due to take off from Chek Lap Kok airport at 7.30am, fly over the Tsing Ma Bridge, head east across the harbour, and round the south side of Hong Kong and Lamma islands before returning to the airport.

Mr Lo said that in order for the flight to go ahead on Monday the cloud base should be just over 600 metres, with visibility of about 5 to 9km.

The plane will not carry passengers but the pilot will be accompanied by a Civil Aviation Department staff member who is a qualified pilot and air traffic controller.

Two government helicopters will fly alongside the plane during its flight.

A two-hour flight in the afternoon has been arranged for members of the government, Airbus and the aviation industry, which will circle Hong Kong airspace.

The A380 requires 10 per cent less runway to take off than a Boeing 747 and can gain altitude quicker. By 2011, about 70 airports worldwide will be able to handle A380 flights. The plane can fly non-stop for 14,966km.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 3rd, 2007, 08:16 AM   #8
EricIsHim
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,397
Likes (Received): 28

Here are some pictures of the low fly of A380 over Victoria Harbour earlier this morning (9/3) local time.

------------------------------------------------------------
From Ocean Terminal in Tsim Sha Tsui by thx_Wong (http://www.hkadb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=15846)



From Government Office Buidling in Admiralty by IceFox (http://www.hkadb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=15849)















By LaiMIng from the Peak ()








By tokitsukaze from Central Plaza ()


By holup from Lugard Rd, the Peak ()







By Flaps30 from Sai Wan / Sai Ying Poon ()





By hk7615b from Stubbs Rd Observation Deck ()





By SuperJet from the Peak ()
__________________
EricIsHim
My PhotoBucket
EricIsHim no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2007, 06:14 AM   #9
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Airbus sees booming Chinese jet demand, A380 orders

HONG KONG, Sept 3 (Reuters) - European plane-maker Airbus expects Chinese airlines will need up to 150 of its jets over the next five years, including its giant A380s, as Chinese airlines expand to serve a domestic and international travel boom.

Airbus foresees local carriers needing 113 of its A380s -- the world's largest passenger aircraft -- over the next two decades, after a production process plagued by delays that spawned billions of dollars of losses at parent firm EADS

Asia and China are a pivotal battleground between Airbus and arch-foe Boeing, both of whom are battling to sell jetliners to the country's three top carriers: China Southern Air, China Eastern and Air China

"Over the next year we will see incremental orders from China for A380," John Leahy, chief operating officer, customers, told reporters on the first day of the Asian Aerospace forum.

"The demand in the Chinese market will see, for us, around 100-150 aircraft each year for the foreseeable future (of around 5 year), which is one of the reasons that we decided to put our own assembly line in China."

Travel to and from China, the world's fourth-largest economy, is expected to keep climbing alongside its double-digit economic growth, dwindling restrictions and increasingly open skies.

Morgan Stanley estimates that global airline seat capacity will expand 3.8 percent in 2007 and 5.2 percent in 2008 -- driven largely by Asia. For Asia alone, those estimates rise to 8-9 percent for 2008-09, versus 5 percent in 2007.

Leahy did not say how Airbus had arrived at its forecasts.

Airbus, which this year is edging out Boeing in the annual race to sell planes globally after losing in 2006, expects its first assembled-in-China jet to be delivered in 2009. The assembly line in Tianjin should hit full capacity -- four planes a month -- in 2011, Leahy said.

China Southern Air, the country's largest carrier by fleet size, has put in five orders for the world's largest passenger aircraft, which Airbus spent more than $10 billion to develop.

To be sure, Airbus' A380 has undergone its share of public relations snafus, from delays in delivery, to temporarily shelving plans for the freighter version after cancellations including from UPS

For a FACTBOX on Airbus and Boeing orders and how they stack up, please click on
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2007, 06:15 AM   #10
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Cathay Pacific CEO tells Hong Kong expo Asian aviation to continue to grow

Hong Kong, Sept. 3 (Xinhua) - The Asia aviation sector will continue to grow in influence in the coming years, Cathay Pacific Airways Chief Executive Tony Tyler said here Monday.

Speaking at the Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress 2007 which opened here Monday, Tyler said, spurred by fast-rising demand in burgeoning markets such as the Chinese Mainland and India, the Asia aviation sector will continue to grow in influence in the coming years.

Asia's carriers are "the best carriers in the world", Tyler said, "but we are also on the way to becoming the biggest airlines in the world. The reason this is happening, apart from growth in the region generally, is the enormous growth in India and China. This is happening fast and it will continue to drive the increasingly important influence of Asian aviation."

Tyler outlined Cathay Pacific's strategy, including the integration of Dragonair with its extensive Chinese Mainland network and the equity relationship the airline now enjoys with Air China, for developing twin hubs in Hong Kong and Beijing. " Hubbing is what it's all about and Cathay Pacific is now truly a network carrier with over 50 per cent of our passengers making connections through Hong Kong," Tyler said.

Tyler also pointed to three key challenges Asian carriers will face: the growing environmental debate, airspace congestion and ever-increasing competition.

Cathay Pacific Airways has been named the Official Carrier of Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress 2007, which kick started on Monday at AsiaWorld-Expo, which is alongside Hong Kong International Airport.

The four-day trade-only event has attracted more than 500 exhibiting companies from over 20 countries and regions, 12 national pavilions, 1,000 conference delegates, 100 speakers; with up to 10,000 trade visitors expected, and more than 200 media accredited.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 4th, 2007, 05:14 PM   #11
EricIsHim
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,397
Likes (Received): 28

Deals take off at Hong Kong airshow
By Sharanjit Leyl
Business reporter, BBC News, Hong Kong

From the manufacture of wing tips to the upholstery that goes on to the seats, planes mean big business - and it is getting even bigger.

Five hundred companies from more than 20 countries, as well as 10,000 trade visitors, are at Hong Kong's Asian Aerospace show this week to strike deals that will shape the future of Asia's aviation industry.

And much of it seems to be focused on China. One of the mainland's big three carriers is already celebrating a $1bn deal with Singapore Airlines signed earlier in the week.

It will bring finance and know-how to China Eastern Airlines, which is based in Shanghai. It also shows the direction the industry's big players are looking.

According to Vincent Liu, the manager of service standards at China Eastern, there is increasing demand for travel within China and more foreigners are flocking to the mainland.

It means the airline business is "increasing vastly, especially for China Eastern", he says.

One of the supporting organisers of this year's Asian Aerospace is also keeping a keen eye on the mainland.

Martin J Craigs, president of Aerospace Forum Asia, says: "The centre of gravity has moved north over the last 20 years.

"China is a big market that's growing - 180 million passengers right now and 780 million in 20 years. That's a new aircraft delivered every two-and-a-half days for 20 years."

Eastern gateway

But the market is not without risks. Already the Chinese government is placing limits on the number of flights over the mainland, because of fears that too much demand could overwhelm the existing infrastructure.

That is perhaps partly why Asia's biggest airshow has chosen to move to the relatively new surroundings of Hong Kong's international airport, after having spent nearly two decades in Singapore.

Tony Tyler - the newly-installed chief executive of Hong Kong's biggest airline, Cathay Pacific - is trying to turn Hong Kong into a stronger hub and gateway to China.

He contends there are still challenges to rival Shanghai, which is quickly becoming a vital business destination.

"Shanghai's a huge city, it's clearly going to be a major city," he says.

"But as an aviation hub, it has disadvantages, as the domestic and international operations operate out of essentially two different airports. That prevents it from being an effective hub for mainland China."

Still, many of the plane manufacturers and suppliers who have come from countries as far afield as Romania and Canada have one thing on their minds - courting China.

Hong Kong, in its role as gateway to the world's fastest-growing economy, may provide an essential link now.

But critics predict that the Asian Aerospace show may well move again, to Beijing or possibly even Shanghai.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/h...ss/6976525.stm

Published: 2007/09/04 06:41:11 GMT

© BBC MMVII
__________________
EricIsHim
My PhotoBucket
EricIsHim no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2007, 07:22 AM   #12
ddes
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,464
Likes (Received): 928

No aircraft orders so far?
ddes no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2007, 09:21 AM   #13
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

China, India airports struggle to meet air travel boom

HONG KONG, Sept 4, 2007 (AFP) - China and India's air infrastructure is creaking under the soaring demand for air travel and huge investment is needed to satisfy the boom, officials said Tuesday.

Both countries are enjoying an unprecedented aviation boom, with China's air traffic expected to double every five years and India seeing an increase of 29 percent in the number of flights taken from its airports this year.

But the growth is exposing a lack of airports and inadaquate facilities, forcing them to invest rapidly to prevent stunting their economic booms, officials from both countries told the Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress here.

"The number of airports in China is insufficient and there is a need for more development in the future," said Shao Daojie, deputy director-general for airports, in the General Administration of Civil Aviation of China.

Speaking at the airshow, Shao said 73 airports were now under construction across the country, bringing a total of around 190 airports by 2010.

But he added, 91 airports -- mainly smaller, regional ones -- were actually running at a loss and only survived by government subsidies.

"Many airports suffer from serious losses ... This is one of the major challenges we are facing," Shao said. Despite this challenge, he said China would not be opening up its airports to foreign investment.

India is also struggling to provide the necessary infrastructure to match its booming demand for air travel, and needs to spend 9.6 billion dollars over the next five years improving airports across the country, said K. Ramalingam, regional executive director for the Civil Airports Authority of India.

"The economic benefits of air transport are so great that the infrastructure development needs to be accommodated to achieve reasonable levels of prosperity," he said.

Ramalingam said he expected 100 million people to travel by plane this year in India, compared to just 43 million in 2003-2004. As a result, the government was working on expanding existing airports, but also developing an improved network of non-urban airports.

But unlike China, India is slowly opening up the airport market, and two airports had recently benefited from private money in the sector, Ramalingam said, with potential for further outside cash.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2007, 11:51 AM   #14
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Quote:
Originally Posted by ddarkdom View Post
No aircraft orders so far?
Aviation big guns will help identify opportunities at Congress
3 September 2007
South China Morning Post

At the heart of the Asian Aerospace Exhibition is the three-day Congress featuring speakers from the heads of the airline industry and related government organisations.

The Congress aims to provide the perfect platform for topical discussion and high-level mainstream debate on the issues central to the region's growth.

Taking place from today until Wednesday, the major themes of the Congress will cover air transport strategy, air transport operations and aerospace technology. Complementing the main themes will be specialist master classes on topics such as business aviation, aircraft finance, maintenance and east-west technology partnerships.

Networking sessions will be organised to give delegates more chances to maximise business opportunities. Among the key speakers at the Congress are: Norman Lo, director-general of the Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department; Tony Tyler, chief executive of Cathay Pacific Airways; Larry Dickenson, vice-president sales, Boeing; and Steve Miller, chief executive of Oasis Hong Kong Airlines.

Mr Miller said: "Moving the event here is a fantastic coup for Hong Kong. I'm surprised that we could prise it away from Singapore. It brings the focus of the aviation industry to Hong Kong. It will provide a great opportunity to form partnerships with Hong Kong and China."

Mr Miller will be talking on day one of the Congress and he will be focusing on "the changing face of long-haul travel".

"I will be focusing on what is different about Oasis and what we have achieved in the past nine months. We have stimulated the market and brought business class options to independent business travellers. The Hong Kong market is moving in a different way to that in Europe and the US. We are served by many different airlines both local and foreign. Foreign airlines are taking away business that should belong to Hong Kong," he said.

Kevin O'Toole, head of strategy for Flight, co-organiser of the Congress, said that Hong Kong was the ideal place for such discussion to be taking place.

"If Asia-Pacific is to achieve its potential in aviation then it clearly needs all of the investment in technology, infrastructure and support services that is needed to make that happen, as well as coping with the realities of competition and more open market access."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 5th, 2007, 01:28 PM   #15
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,404
Likes (Received): 25

Photo Link within HKiTalk, posted by hksf.
__________________
A Hong Kong Guy who was born in HK!
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 6th, 2007, 05:02 AM   #16
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Canadian plane maker Bombardier expects strong Chinese demand for small aircraft
4 September 2007

HONG KONG (AP) - Executives from plane maker Bombardier said Tuesday they expect strong demand from China as domestic air and business travel grows and the need for smaller-sized aircraft rises.

Trung Ngo, Bombardier Aerospace vice president for marketing and communications, said at a press conference at a Hong Kong air show that the company expects China to need 1,660 aircraft with capacity for up to 149 passengers over the next 20 years.

In a deal announced in June, Bombardier, the world's No. 4 plane maker and a specialist in smaller planes, agreed to cooperate with Chinese counterpart China Aviation Industry Corp. I, or AVIC I, on developing a 90- to 149-seat commercial airplane.

The agreement covers AVIC I's own five-abreast ARJ21-900 aircraft and Bombardier's proposed C-Series aircraft.

Ngo said despite Bombardier's technical assistance to AVIC I, demand for smaller aircraft in China is large enough for both companies to thrive in the country.

"The demand from China is very large and the rest of the world's market is big, so we don't see ourselves in conflict at all," he said.

The project to build the ARJ-21 -- a passenger jet seating up to 85 that will be China's first homegrown commercial aircraft -- aims to make state-owned AVIC I a competitor to other makers of smaller passenger jets, such as Bombardier and Brazil's Embraer SA, while laying the groundwork for the development of a Chinese commercial jet of twice the size.

AVIC I says the ARJ-21 is expected to grab up to 60 percent of the domestic market for mid-size regional airliners over the next 20 years.

China will need about 900 mid-sized regional jets over the next two decades, AVIC I estimates, as economic growth drives an expansion of air travel and airlines look for planes tailored for feeder routes.

Separately, David Dixon, Bombardier vice president for sales, said he expects demand in China for private jets to grow "exponentially" as Chinese companies expand abroad.

"Instead of being a recipient of inbound investment, now it is going out. They have to go these markets. They are going to see the value of having that flexibility," he told The Associated Press on the sidelines of the Hong Kong air show.

Dixon said Montreal-based Bombardier has received 200 orders for its private jets worldwide in the first two quarters this year, with seven coming from Greater China, which includes mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong.

He wouldn't break down how many orders the company received from mainland China.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 7th, 2007, 05:22 AM   #17
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Asian aviation to continue to grow in influence: Cathay Pacific

HONG KONG, Sept. 3 (Xinhua) -- The Asia aviation sector will continue to grow in influence in the coming years, Cathay Pacific Airways Chief Executive Tony Tyler said here Monday.

Speaking at the Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress 2007 which opened here Monday, Tyler said, spurred by fast-rising demand in burgeoning markets such as the Chinese Mainland and India, the Asia aviation sector will continue to grow in influence in the coming years.

Asia's carriers are "the best carriers in the world", Tyler said, "but we are also on the way to becoming the biggest airlines in the world. The reason this is happening, apart from growth in the region generally, is the enormous growth in India and China. This is happening fast and it will continue to drive the increasingly important influence of Asian aviation."

Tyler outlined Cathay Pacific's strategy, including the integration of Dragonair with its extensive Chinese Mainland network and the equity relationship the airline now enjoys with Air China, for developing twin hubs in Hong Kong and Beijing. " Hubbing is what it's all about and Cathay Pacific is now truly a network carrier with over 50 percent of our passengers making connections through Hong Kong," Tyler said.

Tyler also pointed to three key challenges Asian carriers will face: the growing environmental debate, airspace congestion and ever-increasing competition.

Cathay Pacific Airways has been named the Official Carrier of Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress 2007, which kick started on Monday at AsiaWorld-Expo, which is alongside Hong Kong International Airport.

The four-day trade-only event has attracted more than 500 exhibiting companies from over 20 countries and regions, 12 national pavilions, 1,000 conference delegates, 100 speakers; with up to 10,000 trade visitors expected, and more than 200 media accredited.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 16th, 2007, 09:32 AM   #18
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

New star in the east
1 November 2007
Aerospace International

Tim Robinson reports from the relocated and refocused Asian Aerospace, held on 3-6 September in Hong Kong.

Relocating a major airshow after 26 years was always going to be a tall order - let alone in a new location where there would be no flying - but the buzz surrounding the new Asian Aerospace Expo held in Hong Kong seems to indicate that the gamble may have paid off. Following the parting of ways between the Singapore Government and Reed Exhibitions (who own the Asian Aerospace brand) the decision was taken to set up a new 100% civil-only exhibition in Hong Kong at the new airport and Expo Centre. With busy airspace all around and the civil focus there was never going to be any chance of a full-on air display with Eurofighters, F-16s and lots of smoke and noise. However, the organisers had made sure that attendees got maximum benefit by combining the exhibition with other events, Air Freight Asia 2007, Aircraft Interiors Asia Expo, the Asia Pacific Airline Training Symposium as well as a full-featured Congress conference.

Airbus dropped in with its A380 which flew over Hong Kong on the first day to provide some great photos and publicity. However, the aircraft was missing its wingtips - one of which had been scraped in a ground handling incident in Bangkok on the way. Airbus chief salesman, John Leahy, was upbeat going through projected sales figures for the region - noting great potential for low-cost carriers in Asia - currently at 9% they have yet to reach the 40% of the market of US and Europe. He also thought that low-cost carriers would be quicker than western budget airlines to move into widebody fleets - citing Air Asia X and Jet Star as examples. Airbus is also looking to Asia, not only for sales but also as partners. Its new final assembly line in Tianjin, China, for example, will churn out four of every 40 A320s built.

Meanwhile, integrated ATC suppliers Park Air Systems was celebrating after winning a $15m contract to supply Dubai World Airport with ATC systems. The company is already well known on the Chinese market where it has been involved for 15 years in helping to develop the aviation infrastructure that is now desperately needed in the "world's fastest growing aviation market."

For those wanting to crack the expanding Indian market (where there are an estimated 1,000 aircraft needed) airline branding company DMA Branding was on hand to give advice. Says Sanjeev Malhotra, director at DMA, it is more than just giving the cabin crew a new uniform - there are certain cultural factors that need to be taken into account as a whole to succeed. He explains that, for the Indian market, the touch points include diversity, warmth, culture-led, vibrant, benign and not too 'in your face.' Family is seen as important too - more unaccompanied minors travel on Air India than any other airline.

In the Air Cargo part of the hall, Boeing, meanwhile, took time out to brief the media on air cargo trends, especially in Asia. With the A380F on ice for the present it looks like Boeing freighters will continue to supply 90% of the world's airlift for some time. Jim Edgar, regional director, commercial airplanes (cargo), explained that by economic analysis, air freight overwhelms the passenger business and carries some 40% of integrated world trade by value despite worries that shipping was clawing back a share. He also predicts that, as Asian economies develop and become net consumers themselves 'directionality' (one way being stronger than the other, leading to the problem of how to fill the aircraft on the return flight) will be reduced.

In the Airline Interiors part of the exhibition, an interesting presentation was on the perceptions and experience of disabled passengers to airline travel. Using a study done by Pacific Ethnography and sponsored by Boeing, various people around the globe with different disabilities were studied using air transport. Pacific Ethnography points out that we are all 'temporarily abled' and that as we get older and more infirm, lessons learnt from understanding how these people interact with the airline experience, before, during and after the flight will have benefit for all. Already there have been changes made to the 787 cabin as a result - such as lavatory door internal latches that will open whichever way they are pulled, a small but significant detail for some.

In the Congress, the conference sessions ranged from the liberalisation of the Asia-Pacific market to low-cost carriers to environmental issues along with the story of Philippine Airlines, back from the brink after a revamp and a ground-breaking deal between management and workers which changed the culture of the carrier, making staff co-owners in the success of the airline. Now turning the biggest profit ever in PAL's history, president Jaime Bautista also criticised the lack of reciprocity in some agreements - adding that he would like more slots to Canada and Japan, arguing that "liberalisation should be equable and fair."

With a massive expansion in pilots and air traffic controllers needed in China there is a huge requirement for proper ICAO standards of aviation English to be taught. Edgewater College from Ireland specialises in teaching and preparing aviation English materials for pilots cabin crew and controllers. With stricter rules coming in during March 2008 that pilots flying international routes must have 'Level 4' proficiency, time is running out for some airlines to qualify their pilots.

In a discussion on airport infrastructure, IATA spokesman Anthony Concil listed some of the improvements being introduced that may make air travel less stressful in the future, such as e-ticketing, bar-coded boarding passes which can be printed at home, RFID baggage and CUSS kiosks (common use self-service) which would allow one 'box' to deliver products for different airlines.

While Hong Kong continues to be known as the 'gateway to China', what was clear at the show was other Chinese cities now trying to get in on the act and compete. Tianjin, for example, has ambitious plans. It has already secured a final assembly line for the Airbus A320 and hopes that Airbus's presence will attract other aerospace companies to set up in the Tianjin Airport Industrial Park. The development will also feature a nearby aviation college to churn out the pilots needed for China's huge airline needs and a seaport for a true multi-modal transport hub. Tianjin also boasts airspace for test flights, another attractive factor.

In a press briefing Bombardier described Asia-Pacific as the "market to come" and forecast that, perhaps even sooner than 2020, it may take to top spot as the no 1 market. Specifically Bombardier expects the region to be the second largest for aircraft up to 149 seats, clearly its regional airliner market. As well as the C-Series, the company is currently studying the Q400X - a 90-seat stretch of the regional turboprop which is now experiencing a resurgence in sales due to its low operating costs and fuel burn. Meanwhile Bombardier continues to keep a close watch on new engine technology which will allow it to gain a quantum leap over current regional jets with the C-Series. This is expected to be funded one third by government, one third by partners and one third by Bombardier itself. Outside in the static park at the airport, Bombardier displayed its latest CRJ900 NextGen regional jet which had stopped off from a busy Asian sales tour.

Delegates in the congress also heard from Steve Miller, founder of Oasis Hong Kong Airlines, which is now pioneering a new low-fare long- haul path. He told of the first hiccups of the airline, when Russian authorities refused overflight permission, the subsequent positive reaction from travellers and future plans which include destinations in North America and Europe. He is also perhaps one of the few airline chiefs to get feedback directly from passengers with a telephone number allowing passengers to text him directly after their flight with their comments.

Traditional multibillion airliner order announcements were thin on the ground. However, Thales and Panasonic did announce big wins with IFE(in flight entertainment) contracts, Thales winning contracts with Korean Air and Air India for its TopSeries IFE systems, while Panasonic's eX2 IFE system was chosen by Cathay Pacific.

Luke Haws, director for design consultancy Priestman Goode, revealed an intriguing concept at an aircraft interiors presentation - an airport 'cocoon' to give stressed travellers peace and quiet while waiting at airports. A 5m2 cubicle, this would be equipped with plasma screen, minibar, charger and be an extension of the airline's first-class seating products.

Maximus Air Cargo made its debut at the show - a new freight carrier specialising in outsize loads based in the United Arab Emirates. The carrier operates an An-124 Condor, Il-76s, Airbus A300-600F and Lockheed L382 Hercules.

Present at the show was Romania which had a large stand in the exhibition hall for seven companies. Aerospace International spoke exclusively to Ovidiu Buhai, director of the systems division of Aerostar which will be working on conversions of BAe146s to cargo aircraft. He foresees a promising market in China and Asia for this freighter conversion and spoke of his aim to develop Aerostar as a centre of excellence for 737 freighter conversions as well as the 146.

Lufthansa Technik is already well established in Asia-Pacific with its MRO network and partnerships training Airbus technicians in Tianjin, a new training facility in Singapore in 2008 as well as a joint venture with MTU in Malaysia opened in June and a new facility in India will opens at the end of 2008. Commenting on the comparison of recruiting engineers in Europe and in Asia-Pacific, it says that European recruits tend to have more practical experience and, while keen, Asia-Pacific students lacked while this they made up in theorectical knowledge.

In summary, then, the new recast Asian Aerospace seens to have survived the transplant of locale fairly well. Vistors polled by Aerospace International at the show seemed generally positive of the event, which the organisers describe as "creating a new template for an aviation exhibition." Visitor numbers were reported to be over 11,000, with more than 500 companies exhibiting. However, there were some of the big names missing - some because of their defence business, others who had sent delegates to assess the lie of the land before committing to a stand. It also faces competition not only from its old venue Singapore, which will be held in February 2008 (which will feature military and civil participation and the usual flying display), but also increasing rivalry from mainland Chinese aviation centres, eager to get in on the action. However, with the stunning backdrop of Hong Kong, excellent transport links (within five hours flight of half the world's population), the no-nonsense business atmosphere and the capacity to expand the exhibition further in the future, for those interested in the seemingly limitless Chinese market Asian Aerospace will be a show to watch for the future.

* Taste of the future While Boeing did not match Airbus by bringing a real airliner, it did give visitors a taste of the 787's flightdeck with this Dreamliner flight simulator which showed off the new type's impressively large MFDs.

* New business aviation hangar opened On the first day of the show, local fixed base operator (FBO), Hong Kong Business Aviation Centre (HKBAC) opened its new $12.8m hangar. With 38,000sqft of space, this doubles the amount of hangar space available to HKBAC and allows it to accommodate aircraft as large as the Boeing BBJ or Airbus ACJ. Demand for business aviation is rising at an increasing pace in China, with Hong Kong reporting a growth in aircaft movements of almost 20% per year.

* Cirrus aims to jump-start Chinese GA sector Private ownership of an aircraft was until recently an impossible dream for anyone in China interested in flying. However, Cirrus Design, which is partnering with ADS-B Technologies to fit their SR22s for the Chinese market with ADS-B equipment, thinks that not only will its aircraft fit the bill for the huge demand for pilot training in the country but also there will be a future GA market of people who wish to fly for fun. Already private flying clubs are springing up - an encouraging sign of pent-up demand, says Cirrus.

* ARJ-21 gets ready to fly China's AVIC 1 made a splash with its mockup of the ARJ-21 regional jet, due to fly in 2008 - a major stepping stone on the way to China becoming a major civil airliner manufacturer to compete with Europe and the US. The company revealed it had signed a strategic partnership agreement with Bombardier which had prompted some media speculation as to what indeed Bombardier hoped to get out co-operating with a potential rival in regional jets. For its part, Bombardier said: "We see AVIC as a key partner on the C-Series." Thus the consensus seems to be that the Chinese market will be big enough for everyone and that Bombardier's C-Series is further in the future than the ARJ-21 so the two aircraft will not compete directly. Interestingly, while the expo had a civil slant (and defence companies were conspicious by their absence) this didn't stop AVIC 1 from showing the aviation press a DVD with unseen images of J-10 fighters, trainers and other military hardware. Even more interestingly for sino-defence watchers was a CAD design briefly glimpsed during the film of what looked like a Galaxy-style military transporter. China's next big military project? Other future (civil) projects include a stretched ARJ-21 and a new regional turboprop.

In the Aircraft Interiors section, the Premium aircraft interiors group was showing off some of its new designs in economy and premium seating. Particularly interesting in the economy seat segment was a design called Freedom which uses two forward facing seats flanking one rearward facing seat to save space at shoulder level and thus allow more seats to be installed (with up to 8% more passengers). Privacy is one issue and the seats also feature a pull forward screen to avoid eye contact if need be. A further variation on this space saving economy design is the Beetle model which features a row of three seats, but arrayed in a staggered herringbone design. This, too, saves space at the critical shoulder level and means that passengers get to enjoy more room while airlines get the option of boosting yields.

TAECO (Taikoo (Xiamen) Aircraft Engineering Company), a subsidiary of HAECO ( Hong Kong Aircraft Engineering Company) celebrated being given CCAR-21 PMA (Parts Manufacturing Approval) certificate by the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC).
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 16th, 2007, 06:51 PM   #19
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Furniture maker flies high with reclaimed plane parts

HONG KONG, Sept 30, 2007 (AFP) - The Mojave Desert in California is where many decommissioned aircraft end up, rows and rows of old planes waiting to be recycled.

But for Dave Hall and his team at MotoArt, this aircraft graveyard in the desert is a supermarket where he can pick up wings and obscure engine parts at scrap prices, before lugging them back to his company's 12,000-square-feet (1,100 square metre) warehouse in Los Angeles.

The junk is then, improbably, turned into high-end unique works of furniture ranging from coffee tables to desk lamps by a team of sculptures and craftsmen.

MotoArt's products range from an 35,000-dollar WACO conference table based around a 1929 WACO taper wing, a refurbished B-52 ejection chair and even engine piston desk clocks, selling for 119 dollars.

The business has become a huge success, with revenue of two million dollars last year, according to Hall, despite setting up just seven years ago.

"We were in the architectural sign business and the guy who recycled our scrap came round and my partner spotted a bit of old propeller," Hall told AFP at the recent Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress.

"He cleaned it up and started making propeller art, propeller sculptures, all of them limited edition."

The original pieces were a huge success, so the partners began scouring bone yards across the western United States, as the Mojave's supply dwindles, finding odd bits of classic planes, both military and commercial, to turn into art.

"The part might sit in our shop for six months before we decide what we can make it into. We would reverse engineer it and eventually come up with something," Hall said.

The art deco style of their pieces harks back to the golden age of aviation that inspired a generation of youngsters and has tapped into the growing market for memorabilia.

"What kid didn't have a toy airplane," Hall said. "Now these people have grown up and they want a piece of aviation history."

The pieces have become hugely popular and can be found from the North Pole to Australia. 19 Entertainment, the company behind American Idol, recently decorated their entire Los Angeles' office with MotoArt pieces.

But the legacy of the plane's past is not always welcome.

"One customer had bought a huge item from us built around a World War Two aircraft's wing," Hall said.

"He phoned us up furious because he said it had some damage. Obviously we took it back and examined it, before replacing it with another. But on closer inspection we found the damage was caused by bullet holes from when the place had been shot.

"We ended up using the desk in our front office, thinking we were going to keep it. It was the very next person who entered our studios interested in a B-52 Desk that bought it -- at a premium."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 1st, 2009, 06:04 PM   #20
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18131

Aviation industry sees break in the clouds
With passenger numbers and cargo volumes still low, business leaders will discuss ways toward a brighter future

31 August 2009
South China Morning Post

Next week will see the return of the Asian Aerospace International Expo and Congress to Hong Kong. The event will showcase the best that the aviation industry has to offer in the region and include more than 400 exhibitors.

Taking place from September 8 to 10 at the AsiaWorld-Expo, the show could not have come at a more crucial time and place for the industry, which has witnessed a sharp decline in passenger numbers and air cargo volumes as a result of the global economic downturn.

Airlines in Asia are no exception, with the Association of Asia-Pacific Airlines (AAPA) reporting that its member airlines carried 11.5 million passengers in July, 7.8 per cent fewer than in the same month last year, a promising rise from June's figure that showed 17 per cent fewer.

Focusing on some of the issues facing the industry will be more than 300 aviation business leaders attending the congress, which will take place alongside the expo.

"The expo and congress will be a major event and an opportunity to exchange ideas about the situation," said Andrew Herdman, AAPA director general. "More importantly, it will be an opportunity to look through the economic downturn and take a fresh look at what we see for the rest of the year and further into the future."

The biggest areas to be hit recently have been business and first-class travel, and cargo which typically makes up about 20 per cent of revenue for most major Asian airlines.

International freight tonne kilometres in July were 11.4 per cent less than the figure for the same month last year, again an encouraging rise from the figures for June.

Mr Herdman explained that a decrease in passenger and cargo numbers had intensified competition among airlines to offer the best prices, but this has had to come hand in hand with lower yields.

"Premium traffic has been particularly badly affected," he said. "There are still individuals travelling in business class, but many companies have implemented austerity programmes and are making their people travel in economy rather than business."

However, the news is not all bad and signs of a recovery may be starting to show. Anecdotal evidence, Mr Herdman said, was starting to suggest that some organisations in the region were responding to positive news coming from Asian economies and were beginning to relax their travel policies.

"Also, a couple of major banks have announced significant profits that have led them to restore travel privileges to their staff," he added.

Figures for cargo are also showing signs of a slow recovery, with numbers bottoming out last December and showing a slow rise since then.

However, the region's heavy reliance on exports will mean that a full recovery will probably not come about until economies in Europe and North America begin to stabilise.

A major focus of the expo and congress will be on the mainland market. Part of the focus of day one of the congress will address the "outlook for aerospace and aviation in China".

Topics covered will include major developments on the mainland, including an overview of the establishment of the Airbus A320 final assembly line in Tianjin, a major step in the development of the industry in the region.

Other topics in this session will include a segment on the lessons learned in East-West partnerships, with a focus on the experience of having the fuselage for the upcoming Bombardier C Series commercial jet manufactured on the mainland.

The mainland's most ambitious commercial aerospace programme, the C919 aircraft being built by the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (Comac), is expected to launch in 2016. A mock up of the 150-seat aircraft will take centre stage at the expo, with Wang Wenbin, assistant general manager of Comac, speaking on day one.

"The mainland is a huge domestic market, second only to the United States in terms of size," Mr Herdman said. "The market has shown very strong growth this year after a disappointing 2008. We have seen a very strong rebound in the domestic market, which has really benefited Chinese carriers."

Before the economic downturn, the global outlook for the aviation industry was for it to see growth of about 5 per cent, with predictions for Asia being the most positive.

"Quite frankly, I don't think this prognosis has really changed," Mr Herdman said. "The caveat is that if you don't survive the downturn, you don't get to enjoy the future growth."

Ultimately, although short-term survival is a primary aim of all airlines - almost all of whom are losing money - Mr Herdman said that airline managers had to focus on long-term issues. Plans for fleets and maintaining a skilled workforce were essential factors that would enable airlines to see positive growth again once the industry started to pick up.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium