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Old August 18th, 2007, 12:27 AM   #1
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Unbuilding A Skyscraper: Deutsche Bank Demolition

BY THE NEW YORK TIMES

A wonderful slideshow covering the demolition in unbuilding a skyscraper at the Deutsche Bank site...


On Sept. 11, 2001, the former Deutsche Bank building at 130 Liberty Street in Lower Manhattan, was damaged by pieces of the World Trade Center. The building, seen here on July 17, is being dismantled. The plywood-enclosed area at the top of the building was in the process of undergoing abatement for asbestos and other hazardous contaminants.


After abatement is completed, each floor of the building looks like this. The dismantling process represents the first complete removal of a building so large and so badly contaminated. Excessive levels of seven hazardous substances, including asbestos, dioxin, lead and chromium were measured in the building.


Where windows were removed, plywood was inserted in place of glass.


A mechanical excavator worked to break apart one of the building's concrete floors. Water was sprayed to hold down dust. The workers can dismantle one floor about every four days.


Once the concrete slab and metal decking are removed, what remains is a steel skeleton of each floor.


Steel beams that framed the horizontal structure of the building were cut away with torches.


As more and more beams and columns are removed, what was once an enclosed building opens up to the sky.


An internal staircase, which served as a fire exit, was one of the last remaining structures on the 27th floor.


Once the interior stairs are removed, workers must reach the upper floors using these external stairways, which are built into scaffolding.


A welder made a final cut to a beam, freeing up the last exterior bay remaining on the 27th floor.


Two skid steer loaders pulled down the bay, which was already cut at the base of each column.


A large container filled with debris, seen at left, was hoisted from the roof.


The container was lowered to a staging area on the south side of Liberty Street.

Unbuilding a Skyscraper Wounded on Sept. 11

It is, Avi Schick said, like watching a video of a building being built, but in reverse.

The Deutsche Bank building at 130 Liberty Street, its windows replaced with plywood, is being dismantled.

Mr. Schick, the chairman of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, was walking through 130 Liberty Street, the building opposite ground zero that was gashed by pieces of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. The building, the New York base of Deutsche Bank at the time, is now being dismantled.

That is different from being demolished. The building is being taken apart almost piece by piece, something demolition experts say has been done before.

What is a first is the complete removal of a building so large and so badly contaminated by hazardous substances. And it is happening under the wary eyes of regulators, neighbors and even the Wall Street types who will someday fill the building that is scheduled to take this one’s place.

So, day after day this summer, workers with acetylene torches are going floor by floor, slicing through the steel beams, the horizontal parts of the building’s skeleton. With help from small tractorlike machines, they are pulling down the beams and the steel columns they are attached to.

Then they are cutting the beams and columns into smaller pieces and loading them into trash-hauling bins that a crane lowers to the street.

Working their way down from the top of what was once a 41-story building, the workers reached the 26th floor on Tuesday morning.

They were cutting into the beams at the southwest corner of that floor, and the two-and-a-half-inch-thick concrete floor slab was vibrating. That was because a mechanical excavator — another tractorlike machine, with a jackhammer mounted on a movable front arm — was breaking through the slab on the southeast corner.

The broken pieces went into another trash-hauling bin and the crane took them away, too. The workers can dismantle one floor every four days or so.

A separate team is working its way through the building, removing the interiors and scrubbing away any contaminants that may remain.

Consultants to the development corporation said more than two years ago that besides asbestos, the building had excessive levels of seven hazardous substances, including dioxin, lead and chromium.

Now those floors have been reduced to their structural elements: naked columns and beams. The walls that once defined offices are gone. So are the plate-glass windows that once looked out on the trade center across the street. So are the wires that connected computers and phones and brought in electricity.

And there was the continuing search for human remains. The chief medical examiner’s office said in February that 766 body parts had been found in the building. Most were fragments of bone less than four inches long.

The long-delayed project got under way in earnest in February. A large construction company, Bovis Lend Lease, won a contract worth $82 million to clear the site, and before that, there was a court fight between Deutsche Bank and its insurers that ended after former Senator George J. Mitchell was called in as a mediator.

The solution was for the development corporation, which is controlled jointly by the state and the city, to buy the building for $90 million.

The federal Environmental Protection Agency approved the plan for dismantling the building last September after reviewing methods for keeping contaminants from being released into the air during the deconstruction.

The E.P.A. action came two months after a deputy commissioner for the city Department of Environmental Protection, Robert C. Avaltroni Jr., began leading meetings every other week with city and state officials and officials from the regional office of the E.P.A. to deal with issues raised by the project. Those meetings continued as Gov. George E. Pataki left office and Gov. Eliot Spitzer took over.

Finally, crews began driving what are called needle beams into the facade. The needle beams anchored the scaffolding, which obscured the building as the interior decontamination, including a top-to-bottom wipe-down, began.

Soon the crews were removing the floor-to-ceiling windows and replacing them with plywood.

Then the project slowed down again, as Bovis and the John Galt Corporation negotiated with the development corporation. They said they wanted an extra $30 million because the project turned out to be more complicated than they had expected it to be. Mr. Schick said the development corporation agreed to advance a total of $38 million toward the cost of finishing the job, with the exact amount to be negotiated — or litigated — later.

What is happening at 130 Liberty Street is certainly different from most demolition projects, where the process is less methodical and the rubble a jumble of steel, concrete, plaster and glass. In some ways, the Deutsche Bank building looks more like a construction site than a demolition site. Scaffolding runs up the outside of the building, as do elevators that are little more than lifts with perforated walls.

On the upper floors, where Mr. Schick and David Emil, the president of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, led their tour, the work is being done by people in hard hats.

That was a sign of progress. The last time a reporter and a photographer were allowed in the building, they had to wear respirators and body suits.

This time, on the 26th floor, there was a grid of steel beams where the floor slab had been removed. And there was the part of the slab that Mr. Schick and Mr. Emil could still walk on, even as the excavator pounded the concrete. “In about 36 months,” Mr. Schick said, “there will be some banker here.”

He and Mr. Emil are determined to finish the disassembly to clear the way for a new building that will house JPMorgan Chase’s investment banking headquarters. “JPMorgan Chase is making a huge bet on our ability to do that,” Mr. Schick said.

Mr. Emil said the removal of the Deutsche Bank building would be finished in “late winter” — that is, in early 2008. But the deal for the additional money for Bovis and John Galt included a bonus if they finish by Dec. 31.

The deconstruction has had its problems. In May, a 22-foot-long metal pipe fell from the 35th floor and smashed through the roof of a nearby firehouse. No one was seriously hurt, but the deconstruction work was halted for about a week while the city reviewed safety precautions.

Mr. Schick said that a Buildings Department inspector is assigned to the building full time, as are inspectors from the E.P.A. and the state Labor Department, who are checking for environmental hazards. He said the work could be halted if they found unexpected debris the size of a dime — in a space not quite as large as an acre.

Twelve monitors that check air quality have been mounted on or near the building.

The last time one went off, Mr. Schick said, it was caused by drilling by Con Edison that had nothing to do with the project.

“This building is unique,” said Mr. Avaltroni, the city environmental official. “It was severely damaged, it had the gash, it had not been dealt with for a period of time, and if you look at it symbolically, it’s very important to get it down. The main objective here is do it right, get it done.”
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Old August 22nd, 2007, 11:11 PM   #2
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/22/ny...l?ref=nyregion
Critics Say Lessons From 9/11 Were Not Followed in Deutsche Bank Blaze

By AL BAKER
Published: August 22, 2007

After the Sept. 11 attack at the World Trade Center, an independent consultant studied the Fire Department’s performance and identified a number of lapses amid all the undeniable valor of that day. It said that too many men rushed into the buildings before anyone realized the danger they were in, contributing to the staggering death toll.

The consultant, McKinsey & Company, said the Fire Department needed to use more caution and preparation when it approached such a major, complicated fire, and not send too many men in before it knew what it was dealing with.

Saturday’s fire at the former Deutsche Bank building, which left two firemen dead, presented its own set of challenges, but it also bore similarities to Sept. 11 that went beyond geography, including the fact that the building was a high-rise.

Now, some are questioning Saturday’s response, noting that, at one point, more than 100 firefighters were inside the building even though the fire was out of control and wildly unpredictable — and that those men had to be called out. And they were inside even though, unlike the situation in the twin towers, no workers were trapped.

“Clearly firefighters were sent into a deathtrap,” said Stephen J. Cassidy, president of the Uniformed Firefighters Association. “I think the Fire Department’s position is they didn’t know how bad it was. We certainly need to find out why they didn’t know.”

Yesterday, Fire Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta directed his investigators to determine why the department did not have a plan in place to fight a fire in the building.

Mr. Cassidy made his remarks as the Manhattan district attorney, Robert M. Morgenthau, announced that his office had opened an investigation into the fire to determine if any crimes had been committed. The move extends the prosecutors’ subpoena power to the fire marshals who are working with the district attorney’s office.

Mr. Cassidy also called for an independent investigation of the fire by the state attorney general, Andrew M. Cuomo, who said last night that his office had begun reviewing the circumstances of the fire. Mr. Cassidy said the department was “not capable” of doing its own investigation because of its own involvement and its relationship with other city agencies involved.

In a way, it is a debate that goes to the heart of Fire Department culture — rushing into burning buildings, after all, is what firefighters do. And for their part, fire officials said they believed that Saturday’s fire was well managed, and that the department’s response could not be compared to its actions on 9/11.

“This is a fire in a high-rise building; it is not a terrorist attack,” said Francis X. Gribbon, the department’s chief spokesman. “They see the fire, they know where the fire is. They use the protocols in place to fight the fire.”

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg defended the department’s decision to send the more than 100 firefighters up into the building to fight the blaze, saying they bravely improvised in a crisis.

The Deutsche Bank building is being dismantled. Sheathed in black netting and plywood, the floors where the men were trapped had been sealed off with plywood and plastic sheeting, creating a maze that became especially daunting as the building filled with wind-fanned black smoke.

Radio transmissions captured the moment when high-ranking officials ordered all the men out — a striking echo of Sept. 11. With two men down and 29 Maydays coming from hellishly fire-engulfed floors, commanders wanted to do a head count.

The priorities of those in charge of the fire response are crystallized in one transmission: A senior official cursed as he said he did not care about the building, and shouted, “Where are my men?”

Firefighters were trapped without water because the standpipe system — plagued by a shut valve, cracks and a broken pipe — malfunctioned. The two firefighters who died, Robert Beddia, 53, and Joseph Graffagnino, 33, ran out of air. Investigators are focusing on a discarded cigarette or faulty electrical panel as the cause of the blaze.

“This was an unoccupied building,” said a former fire official. “On 9/11 we sent too many people in. McKinsey said that we should not rush men in and, even though the investigation is ongoing, it seems obvious at this point that we still have not learned the lesson that if you’re going to send people in, there should be adequate time and means to get them out.”

Charles R. Blaich, a retired deputy chief who was in charge of safety for the Fire Department at the ground zero site, said the McKinsey report changed how the department managed disasters.

“After 9/11 there were directions that came out from the chief of department that we never get ourselves into a position at these huge disasters where we just blindly assign assets without reasonably assessing what risks we face and what benefits we will achieve,” Mr. Blaich said. “What are we going to achieve by doing this?”

Thomas Von Essen, the fire commissioner on Sept. 11, said he had had many conversations with firefighters who responded on Saturday. He said many felt the operation had moved too quickly.

Mr. Von Essen said it was widely known that the bank building was undergoing a complex and dangerous demolition. He said fire officials should not have been surprised by what the firefighters encountered.

John J. McDonnell, the president of the Uniformed Fire Officers Association, said he believed the lessons of Sept. 11 had been learned “to some extent.”

“I don’t know if the upper echelons of the Fire Department were aware of the complex nature of the abatement within the building, I mean everyone from the fire commissioner to his staff,” said Mr. McDonnell, whose union represents 2,450 members.

“Were they aware of the complex nature?” he asked. “If they were aware prior to that, maybe there would have been a different fire plan in place.”

He added, “Under a hazardous materials condition, you approach things on a much more cautious level. ”

Firefighters at the scene checked in with commanders, said Mr. Gribbon, the department spokesman. “They were given assignments and they went to work.”

Mr. Gribbon declined to release a minute-by-minute breakdown of the department’s response because he said the department was conducing an internal review that involved listening to radio transmissions, transcribing the tapes, interviews and re-interviews, among other things.

Mr. McDonnell said no one had been prepared to find the stairwell landings blocked by the heavy plywood boards used to compartmentalize buildings where asbestos was being removed. Firefighters had to use an exterior elevator and scaffolding stairs to get up and down.

Jerome M. Hauer, director of the city’s Office of Emergency Management from 1996 to 2000, said it was “unfair” to contrast the department’s operations on Saturday with the findings of the McKinsey report because “I don’t feel that the report was accurate in some of its assessments.”

He said the accountability for what occurred “has to rest” with the building owner and the demolition operators, not with the Fire Department.

Anemona Hartocollis and Colin Moynihan contributed reporting.
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Old June 1st, 2009, 12:03 PM   #3
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No updates on the 130 Liberty Street deconstruction since late 2008. Obviously there must be some new law against making updates about the building's deconstruction that was made around that time.
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Old June 1st, 2009, 01:39 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim856796 View Post
No updates on the 130 Liberty Street deconstruction since late 2008. Obviously there must be some new law against making updates about the building's deconstruction that was made around that time.
#1 wtf u talking about!!

#2 thank you for bringing this 2008 thread back, NOT!!!

#3 there is no new updates
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Old June 1st, 2009, 04:49 PM   #5
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No updates on the 130 Liberty Street deconstruction since late 2008. Obviously there must be some new law against making updates about the building's deconstruction that was made around that time.
without words...
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Old June 2nd, 2009, 12:27 AM   #6
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Demolition project must be on hold or something. Apparently they're stuck on floor 25.
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Old June 3rd, 2009, 04:28 AM   #7
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I took the World Trade Center memorial tour last August. The demo of this building is tied up in a ridiculous amount of bureaucracy. They found a few miniscule DNA samples and had to go through the entire building with all of these high tech gadgets to figure out who exactly it belongs to.

It could be on hold though as well so who knows.
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Old March 10th, 2010, 01:29 PM   #8
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Down to Level 20 now, projected end of the demolition is January 2011 (http://www.lowermanhattan.info/const...et__77170.aspx)
Any new pictures?
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Old March 14th, 2010, 05:14 AM   #9
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3D animation of deconstruction of Deutsche Bank Building.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAy-jgt_ng0

Last edited by iamxeddiex; March 14th, 2010 at 05:20 AM.
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Old March 14th, 2010, 12:03 PM   #10
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How may buildings of lower manhattan are now (of will soon be) destroyed because of the terrorist attack?

- WTC1
- WTC2
- WTC7
- Marriott hotel
- Deutsche bank building
- Fiterman Hall
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Old March 14th, 2010, 04:02 PM   #11
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Quote:
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How may buildings of lower manhattan are now (of will soon be) destroyed because of the terrorist attack?

- WTC1 - 110 fl
- WTC2 - 110 fl
- WTC7 - 47 fl
- Marriott hotel - 22 fl
- Deutsche bank building - 41fl
- Fiterman Hall - 15 fl
when the deconstruction of the deutsche bank building is done, you will have a total loss of 345 floors. the terrorist certainly did a huge damage to the city of NY.
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Old March 15th, 2010, 12:08 AM   #12
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Terrorist should have demolished only the three lowrise buildings instead of throwing away the entire WTC complex altogether.
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Old April 26th, 2010, 06:30 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramses View Post
How may buildings of lower manhattan are now (of will soon be) destroyed because of the terrorist attack?

- WTC1
- WTC2
- WTC7
- Marriott hotel
- Deutsche bank building
- Fiterman Hall
- WTC 1 (north tower)
- WTC 2 (south tower)
- WTC 3 (Marriott hotel)
- WTC 4
- WTC 5
- WTC 6
- WTC 7
- WTC PATH station
- Deutsche Bank building
- Fiterman Hall
- St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church



btw the deconstruction is now on floor 16, 17 and 18
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Old August 15th, 2010, 03:39 PM   #14
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now down to floor 9 or 10, in january it is supposed to be gone completely..
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Old August 16th, 2010, 10:30 AM   #15
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what does the new building look like?
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Old August 19th, 2010, 11:24 AM   #16
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I think they have not finally decided what to build there, since the demand for office space is not even high enough so that they can build the WTC 2 and 3 right now (at least not until enough tenants are found)
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Old August 27th, 2010, 10:45 AM   #17
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new update from GreenwichBoy on WiredNewYork:



and some news on lowermanhattan.info

*The following information was last updated on August 26, 2010.

Deconstruction:

* Deconstruction of the building is now on floors 8 and 9, moving downward.
* The projected end date for deconstruction is December 2010/January 2011.
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Old September 12th, 2010, 09:23 AM   #18
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Will some of the steel beams and other materials from 130 Liberty Street be recycled or just taken to a landfill?
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Old September 19th, 2010, 11:28 PM   #19
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http://www.lowermanhattan.info/news/...val_69603.aspx

Rather than cut steel members on the roof into smaller lengths for removal in bulk containers, crews are cutting steel as larger sections that the crane can lower directly to the ground. Once removed to the ground, the high-quality steel is cut into smaller pieces and trucked away from the site for recycling.
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Old September 20th, 2010, 12:50 AM   #20
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Now this is how all steel-framed highrise buildings should be demolished (non implosion demolitions anyway). If this skyscraper had a concrete frame, it would be more difficult.
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