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Old October 6th, 2007, 01:01 PM   #21
Zabonz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pronaos View Post
Even before the first steel skyscrapers were constructed in the late 19th century, the world already possessed a large number of tall buildings. Many cathedrals in Europe and around the world have been around since medieval times and continue to be some of the tallest structures in many cities.

Tallest Standing Cathedrals and Churches:

3. Kölner Dom (Cologne, Germany) - 516 feet


2. Basilica of Our Lady of Peace (Yamoussoukro, Ivory Coast) - 518 feet



i just can't belive that cathedral in yamaoussoukro is taller than kolner dome
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Old October 7th, 2007, 06:53 AM   #22
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This is one of the best threads on this site, very informative and unbelievable photos, please keep them coming!
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Old October 7th, 2007, 08:12 AM   #23
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The Kölner Dom makes me
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Old October 8th, 2007, 01:55 AM   #24
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^ If so, just take a hanky and enjoy



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Old October 21st, 2007, 07:49 PM   #25
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Gopurams of Meenakshi Temple:





[IMG]http://************/azi4br.jpg[/IMG]

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Old October 21st, 2007, 08:52 PM   #26
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Old October 22nd, 2007, 12:19 PM   #27
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Should a cathedral be considered as highrise building?

A highrise building, as a skyscraper, is a building with multiple habitable floors. The interior of a cathedral is a large room with a very high ceilling. There is usually only one floor at a cathedral.

Modern buildings most similiar to cathedrals are large hangars, buildings of thermal power stations and other large hall buildings, but not skyscrapers.
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Old October 22nd, 2007, 12:38 PM   #28
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sorry guys .. but highrise buildings were first created long time ago in the arabian peninsula ... in yemen ...







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Old October 22nd, 2007, 04:44 PM   #29
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Liverpool Anglican Cathedral













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Old October 22nd, 2007, 08:02 PM   #30
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[IMG]http://i22.************/332yow9.jpg[/IMG]

Normally it had to have 2 towers, if it was build it was probably the most amazing gothic structure on Earth. But i like it as it is.
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Old October 23rd, 2007, 11:45 AM   #31
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@europe!: Where is this cathedral?
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Old October 23rd, 2007, 08:50 PM   #32
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edit

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Old October 23rd, 2007, 10:13 PM   #33
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Paoay Church, Philippines



Construction of the church started in 1704 and was completed in 1894 by the Augustinian friars led by Fr. Antonio Estavillo.

It is probably the best-known “earthquake Baroque” church in the Philippines. Large coral stones were used for the lower level while bricks were used for the upper levels of the church. The walls are 1.67 meters thick and are supported by 24 carved and massive buttresses.

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Old October 23rd, 2007, 10:24 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Obelixx View Post
@europe!: Where is this cathedral?
Antwerp
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Old October 24th, 2007, 06:09 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by europe! View Post

Normally it had to have 2 towers, if it was build it was probably the most amazing gothic structure on Earth. But i like it as it is.
Yeah, because only one tower is completed it has something special. I would've found it weird when the 5 planned towers were completed, but that's probably because I'm used to it like this.
Simply beautiful!
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Old October 24th, 2007, 11:00 PM   #36
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Here are several Cathedrals in Britain.

DURHAM CATHEDRAL was one of the first major Cathedrals to be built of stone in England. It was built by what were the monks of Lindersfarm, founded by the revered St.Cuthbert in the 7th century. Fleeing Viking attacks (the monks being the first in England to encounter them) they resettled to a defended position over the River Wear. The later town then became the center of the Diocese of Durham.
The first stone was laid on 12th August 1093. The Cathedral was then completed during the 12th century. With the west towers added in the early 13th and the main tower rebuilt in the 15th century. It stands as one of the finest examples of Norman architecture in Europe.

By JochenB on flickr:
image hosted on flickr




ELY CATHEDRAL like many of its contemporaries was built in increments. It's shares a similarity with Durham cathedral in that it was originally a monastery consecrated by Saint Ehterelda in the 7th century. Destroyed by the vikings in the 8th, the monastery was rebuilt as a Benedictine institution in the 10th. Without its monastical heritage, Ely, once an nondescript island in the Fenns, would have unlikely become the city it is now. After displaying considerable resistance to the Normans up to 1070, the conquerers then went about rebuilding the site in stone.

Work began in 1083 on the main structure finishing in in 1189. During this time the Monastery was consecrated as a Cathedral. It is an excellent example of Romanesque Architecture. As seen here:



However many additions have been made. In 1215 Bishop Eustace added the Galilee Porch, and example of early English Gothic, seen here:



Eustace's successor, Bishop Hugh Northwold, tore down the Norman east end and replaced it with a presbytery made of Barnack stone and Purbeck marble. This significant renovation project, which served to relieve the congestion of pilgrims around St. Etherelda's shrine, was completed in 1252.

In 1322 the main tower collapsed severely damaging the nave, choir and transepts. The tower was replaced with the unique octagon structure so related with Ely Cathedral. In 1392 it inspired a new octagonal belfry made out of white stone which sits atop.





LINCOLN CATHEDRAL was originally a mother church, but was made a the first Cathedral in England in 1072. Bishopr Regimius headed its construction. His cathedral was completed in 1092 but was destroyed by fire 50 years later. Rebuilt again, it was once again destroyed by an earthquake (which though relatively small proved perilous to the heavy stone building) in 1185. King Henry II approved the election of Hugh of Avalon, then a Carthusian monk and later saint, the new Bishop of Lincoln.

He headed the reconstruction of the Cathedral, dying before it was ever completed. Starting in 1186 work continued for a century the new cathedral would be the first example of a Cathedral built entirely in the nascent English Gothic style. Unfortunately, the architects were learning the style as they went and many problems now plague the cathedral. The two towers suffer from serious weight problems, in 1807 the spires were removed. Significant work has been needed to bolster them. However, the cathedral remains magnificent.







CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL is the center of the Church of Engalnd, and the see of the Primate of All England. Founded by Saint Augustaine, the first missionary Saint to arrive in Enlgand, in 597, for the next 400 years the site served as a monastery. Archbishop Cuthbert added the second building on the site in the 8th century in the form of a baptistry and dedicated to St. John the Baptist.

Critical to the history of Canterbury Cathedral was the murder of St. Thomas Becket on Tuesday, December 29, 1170, by order of King Henry II. The king later performed penance there in 1174.

The income from pilgrims visiting his shrine, which was reported to be a place of miraculous healing, largely paid for the subsequent rebuilding of the cathedral with its beautiful stained glass windows and the cathedral's associated buildings.

By Chingers7 on flickr:
image hosted on flickr


In 1174 a fire destroyed the eastern end, Guilliaume de Sens was hired to rebuild it. This helped to further introduce the new Gothic style, then becoming ever more prominent on the continent, into England. William the Englishman later designed the huge Trinity chapel to house the remains of Beckett.
Prior Thomas Chillenden then rebuilt the Nave in the Perpendicular style of English Gothic. In 1430 the short central tower was demolished and rebuilt at a height of 297 feet.

The Nave:


The Bell Harry tower (main tower) by f0rbe5 on flickr:
image hosted on flickr




SALISBURY CATHEDRAL has the the highest spire of all cathedrals in Britain.
The Cathedral is also relatively unique in the way the vast majority of it is was built in under one century (every but the tower was complete in 38 years), in one style.
Construction of the cathedral commenced when the bishopric was moved here from Old Sarum in 1220 during the tenure of Richard Poore. By 1258 the nave, transepts and choir were complete. The magnificent west front was ready by 1265.

The huge spire was added in 1320 and stands at 404 feet (123 meters). Combined with the tower it has a total weight of 6,300 tonnes. Butresses, bracing arches and iron ties have all be employed to keep it standing. The spire, built of English oak and lead, consumed huge amounts of wood. As with most constructions of this kind, the trees large enough could only be found in royal forests, requiring royal consent to be removed.







GLOUCESTER CATHEDRAL has a monastical origin too. The abbey of St.Peter was founded by the Saxon King Osric in 681. The original wood abbey was replaced with a stone one in 1058. In 1085 King William I ordered the famous Domesday book in the abbey building. He exempted it from all taxes and royal service, setting a precedent for this Cathedral's historic link with the monarchy, something that may well have saved it during the dissolution of th monasteries. In 1088 the building burnt down and work began on a new one drawing on both it's Anglo Saxon and Norman inheritance for design. The new abbey was finally consecrated in 1100 but burnt down again 22 years later. Reconstruction was slow and lacked funds. But by 1216 it was good enough to be the chosen venue for the crowning of the young Henry III. The coronation revitalized royal interest in the Abbey Church.

After King Edwards II gruesome and untimely death his body was burried in the cathedral. The circumstances of his death soon served to make him a de facto saint, and the influx of pilgrims to his grave provided the bishopric the finances to embark upon a radical program of reconstruction. Starting in 1331 and lasting for 20 years much of the redesign was done in the then popular English Perpendicular style. The Great east window, the largest stained glass window in Europe, and the famous Choir stalls were installed in 1350.

The ornate tower, done in the new English Perpendicular.


by Suzy b e on flickr:
image hosted on flickr


The ornate Choir stalls looking west.



This cathedral provides us with the few extant examples of early English Perpendicular Gothic as others in Westminster abbey and the original St Pauls have since been destroyed.



YORK MINSTER is only second to Canterbury. A glorious example of imposing Gothic architecture.

York has had a Christian presence since the year 300. The first recorded church was built in 627 for the the baptising of Edwin the King of Northumbria.
Throughout the 630s the church was enlarged with stone. Under Saint Wilfred the then bishop the church became the sight of one of largest libraries and schools in Europe. In 741 the complex was rebuilt to a massive scale after fire. However, from that point on the area became subject to various invasions and kingdoms and the sight fell into disrepair. By the 11th century though, the area had reacquired its prominence and several archbishops from the area attended the coronation of William. After the destruction of the church was rebuilt in the Norman Romanesque style in 1080- 1154.

Over 130 years later Walter de Gray was made archbishop in 1215 and ordered the construction of a Gothic structure to compare to Canterbury.
The north and south transepts were the first new structures; completed in the 1250s, both were built in the Early English Gothic style but had markedly different walls. A substantial central tower was also completed, with a wooden spire. Building continued into the 15th century; the cathedral was declared complete in 1472.

West Front towers:



From the old city wall by saxonfenken on flickr
image hosted on flickr


view from south Transept:

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Old October 26th, 2007, 10:08 PM   #37
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Gloucester cathedral looks incomplete. Was there no tower planned looking similiar to those of Cologne cathedral?
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Old October 26th, 2007, 10:43 PM   #38
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A taller spire was never planned. It has been the same height since the completion of its tower in the late 15th century
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Old October 27th, 2007, 01:44 AM   #39
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Quote:
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Gloucester cathedral looks incomplete. Was there no tower planned looking similiar to those of Cologne cathedral?
Really, you think so? I dunno, I think the four smaller spires around the corners finish it off quite well.


I guess the medieval builders would have loved to put on a spire, but you gotta remember how hard it was to build such structures securely then. After all, the ones on Cologne cathedral were built in the 19th century when the medieval building was completed using techniques and materials the first skyscrapers were built with.
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Old October 28th, 2007, 05:33 AM   #40
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Milan Cathedral (Duomo di Milano)1418, Italy



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Siena Cathedral,1179

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Florence Santa Maria del Fiore and Giotto's bell tower,1296

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San Marco and bell tower,Venice 1063

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