daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture

Architecture news and discussions on all buildings types and urban spaces
» Classic Architecture | European Classic Architecture and Landscapes | Public Space | Shopping Architecture | Design & Lifestyle | Urban Renewal and Redevelopment



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old October 28th, 2007, 02:32 PM   #41
Lusitania
Luxury and Speed
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 74
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Obelixx View Post
Should a cathedral be considered as highrise building?

A highrise building, as a skyscraper, is a building with multiple habitable floors. The interior of a cathedral is a large room with a very high ceilling. There is usually only one floor at a cathedral.

Modern buildings most similiar to cathedrals are large hangars, buildings of thermal power stations and other large hall buildings, but not skyscrapers.
Most cathedrals have two floors, some have three; but in the modern sense it is not a "highrise," but take apart the word, high and rise and you have a cathedral. Essentially a structure that rises into the sky (high), to put it simply.
__________________
"A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad." -Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt
Lusitania no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old October 29th, 2007, 09:07 PM   #42
MoreOrLess
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,240
Likes (Received): 228

Quote:
Originally Posted by EADGBE View Post
Well, they were finished in the late C19 but started centuries beforehand, so the point about them being the 'original supertalls' remains.
Almost all of Koln and the tower at Ulm were built in the 19th century though.
MoreOrLess no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2007, 12:24 AM   #43
Iemand
Registered User
 
Iemand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Blankenberge
Posts: 505
Likes (Received): 10

Cassablanca: 210 m (highest religious building in the world)

Mecca: 210 m (greatest religious building in the world)

Koekelberg (Brussels): the 6th greatest church in the world


Paris:

Budapest: 96 m (basilica)

Bruges: 122,3 m

Landshut (Germany): 130,6 m

Vienna: 136,7 m

Strasbourg:
Iemand no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2007, 05:38 AM   #44
MDguy
Registered User
 
MDguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 3,671

here are not so old cathedrals in my area, not even close to those of the rest of the world, i guess, but world class view in the washington cathedral!

wash. cathedral
image hosted on flickr


this mormon temple that I don't knows name, in Maryland - from the highway it looks like a castle! although it isn't really a cathedral
image hosted on flickr



Mount vernon methodist church in Baltimore

image hosted on flickr
MDguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2007, 03:00 PM   #45
Grollo
Developer
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: melbourne
Posts: 7,122
Likes (Received): 1015

The tallest cathedral in Australia is St Patricks Cathedral Melbourne which is 105m high:

__________________
www.urbanmelbourne.info
Grollo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2007, 06:26 PM   #46
Unionstation13
Registered User
 
Unionstation13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Indianapolis/Lafayette
Posts: 3,439
Likes (Received): 37

The St.Mary German cathedral in Lockerbie Square, downtown Indianapolis, was built at the turn of the century(19th-20th century) and was one of the many cathedrals that made up the skyline of Indianapolis before highrises were allowed to be constructed.
The St.Mary German cathedral was designed to look like a smaller version of the Cologne cathedral in Germany.

In the downtown area, there are about 9 or 10 other cathedrals or churches, and dozens in the central city.
__________________
Peter- "Geesh, Meg is in there taking a nap under water!".
Unionstation13 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 07:23 PM   #47
Golan Trevize
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ponte - Guimarães
Posts: 313
Likes (Received): 44

Jeronimos' Monastery - Where the Lisbon Treaty was signed





Batalha's Monastery - Built to celebrate the crushing of the 4 times bigger spanish army at the Battle of Aljubarrota.





Bom Jesus Sanctuary - Braga





Sameiro Sanctuary - Braga


Golan Trevize no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 11:02 PM   #48
fettekatz
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,557
Likes (Received): 47

a very beautiful cathedral
fettekatz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2007, 09:43 AM   #49
TU 'cane
Registered User.
 
TU 'cane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Tulsa
Posts: 2,251
Likes (Received): 111

some really pretty buildings
__________________
Farewell Texas Stadium
1971-2008


Principle 27: The burden of debt is as destructive to freedom as subjugation by conquest.
-28 Principles of Freedom


"Political correctness does not legislate tolerance; it only organizes hatred."
-Jacques Barzun
TU 'cane no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2007, 12:32 PM   #50
c0kelitr0
Resident Whore
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Manila-Canberra
Posts: 2,602
Likes (Received): 21

This is Manila's tallest religious building i think. probably over 100 meters. but it's not that old.

c0kelitr0 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2007, 03:41 PM   #51
SFC
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Sevilla
Posts: 362
Likes (Received): 14

Cathedrals of Andalusia

The Giralda is the bell tower of the Cathedral of Seville in Seville, Spain, one of the largest churches in the world and an outstanding example of the Gothic and Baroque architectural styles. The tower first two thirds is a former Almohad minaret which, when built, was the tallest tower in the world at 97.5 m (320 ft) in height

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Cadiz (This it not Havana)

# Located at Plaza de la Catedral, the impressive yellow-domed cathedral can be seen from almost everywhere in the city and was built between 1722 and 1838, thus combining different architectural styles.

# The original Baroque design that characterizes the vaults is joined by Neoclassical elements on the façade and Torre de Poniente tower (open to visitors), and at the 50 metre-high (166 ft) dome created by the architect Juan Daura.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Granada

Cathedral of the Annunciation) is a cathedral in Granada, in the Autonomous Region of Andalusia, Spain, designed at the peak of the Spanish Renaissance. In 1529 Diego de Siloé outlined the Renaissance lines of this building upon its Gothic foundations, with a triforium and five naves instead of the usual three. Most unusually, he created a circular capilla mayor rather than a semicircular apse, perhaps inspired by Italian ideas for circular 'perfect buildings' (eg in Alberti's works). Within its structure the cathedral combines other orders of architecture. It took 181 years for the cathedral to be built.

In 1667 Alonso Cano altered the initial plan for the main façade, introducing Baroque elements. The magnificence of the building would be even greater, if the two large 81 meter towers foreseen in the plans had been built; however the project remained incomplete for various reasons, among them, financial.

image hosted on flickr


Jaen

Jaén Cathedral, one of the most important Renaissance style cathedrals, begun in 1570 and completed in 1802. It is dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin, and it was built to shelter the relic of The Holy Face, or Veil of Veronica, lodged at the major chapel and that is exposed to the public every Friday. Due to the extension in the time of it construction, they can be appreciated different artistic styles, being the most prominent Renaissance, being Andrés de Vandelvira the most important architect. He constitutes the maximum exponent of the Andalusian renaissance

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Malaga

Malaga´s cathedral was built between 1528 and 1782 on or near the site of a former mosque. While original plans had allowed for two towers, lack of funds resulted in the completion of only one, giving rise to the name by which the cathedral is affectionately referred to, La Manquita, loosely interpreted as "one armed woman". About 90 metres high.

image hosted on flickr



Others importants Colegiatas. Town Cathedrals are

Osuna.

image hosted on flickr


Baeza

image hosted on flickr


Jerez

image hosted on flickr
__________________
Blog Arquitectura y Diseño
SFC no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2007, 06:02 PM   #52
Golan Trevize
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ponte - Guimarães
Posts: 313
Likes (Received): 44

Basilica Santa Luzia - Viana do Castelo




Convento Cristo - Tomar

Golan Trevize no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2007, 03:55 PM   #53
zwischbl
Registered User
 
zwischbl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Munich / Buenos Aires [x]
Posts: 315
Likes (Received): 14

I love to see how every european country has its very own style to build their cathedrals!
Very impressive all of them!
The ones i dont like too much are the one from the US and Austrailia or let´s say the newer ones. In general they dont have as much character as the ancient european counterparts and werent built by the greatest masters. Thats how it appears to me at least. Of course there are exceptions!
zwischbl no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2007, 07:23 PM   #54
OakRidge
Registered User
 
OakRidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: El Camino Real - California
Posts: 693
Likes (Received): 1461

The Washington National Cathedral is only one hundred years old. That is the main difference between cathedrals in the US and Australia as compared to cathedrals in Europe. By the time the US and Australia got around to building major cathedrals they were into the revival stage. Though the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in New York could be considered the largest cathedral in the world.
OakRidge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2007, 03:42 AM   #55
Ch.G, Ch.G
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 141
Likes (Received): 18

Quote:
Originally Posted by The-Sultan View Post
sorry guys .. but highrise buildings were first created long time ago in the arabian peninsula ... in yemen ...



Come on, man, if you're not going to include dates don't even both posting something like that. Also, Ancient Rome built apartment blocks (insulae) that were over 21 meters (70 feet) tall. Ancient peoples of the American Southwest also built impressive apartment like complexes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OakRidge View Post
The Washington National Cathedral is only one hundred years old. That is the main difference between cathedrals in the US and Australia as compared to cathedrals in Europe. By the time the US and Australia got around to building major cathedrals they were into the revival stage. Though the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in New York could be considered the largest cathedral in the world.
Don't forget, revivalism was not limited to the New World; many revival cathedrals were built throughout Europe during the 19th and 20th centuries, too.

As has already been pointed out, these are not highrises as we define them today; they are mostly hollow structures entirely supported by masonry walls. Fill that space with five or six floors and they would have surely collapsed.

More recent examples may be reinforced with a skeletal system.
Ch.G, Ch.G no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2007, 05:10 AM   #56
Skybean
天豆
 
Skybean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 9,938
Likes (Received): 271

Quote:
Originally Posted by the spliff fairy View Post
That list completely misses out the Asian pagodas, stupas and dagobas that were once the tallest in the world at some time. Alot of history doesnt take into account there have been many tall pre-skyscraper buildings in Asia too:

Potala Palace is 656 ft high and 1300 ft long, carved into a hollowed out mountain and last rebuilt in the 17th century. Its basically a 13 storey palace sitting on a huge 300 ft stone built base to take the weight. In terms of engineering marvels, the base outshines the palace built onto it.



also the legendary 13 storey Tianning pagoda was restored in 2004 to much acclaim, 510 ft high and dating from 600 AD. It has been destroyed 5x in its 1350 year history. Another pagoda of similar size was the centrepiece of ancient Hangzhou, the eastern counterpart to Rome and her Empire at the time.



Basically they could build so high in those times thanks to the groundbreaking design where the load rests on the central beam (rather like a modern skyscraper's elevator 'core'):

This strong central beam supports the whole building, imbedded in a massive base making it (relatively) earthquake resistant. There are very few accounts over the millennia of pagodas collapsing, they last thousands of years but are mostly destroyed by fire. If the beam splits though then youre in trouble:




another forgotten pagoda, the 162 ft base of the Mingun Stupa in Myanmar (Burma), ravaged by an earthquake. Had it been completed it would have been over 500ft high



similarly the 2300 year old Jetavana Stupa in Sri Lanka was the tallest brick building when it reached over 400ft in the 3rd century BC. The tower/cone part fell off leaving the remaining 231 ft high main chamber. Looks like the worlds biggest dome to me, but hey, its a stupa.



the worlds tallest chedi at Nakhom Pathon in Thailand was complted in 1870, at 420 ft tall

I completely agree. Asian pagodas have been built and standing hundreds of years before any of these cathedrals.

Giant Wild Goose Pagoda - Xi'an (652 AD)


Xumi Pagoda (636 AD)


Iron Pagoda of Kaifeng (1046 AD)
__________________
My Photos」 ● Hong Kong 1|2|3 ● Macau 1 ● London 1 ● New York City 1
Photo Threads」 ● Flying Over Hong KongCity Life Series」 ● Hong KongShanghaiSeoulTokyo
Skybean no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2007, 12:07 PM   #57
Ch.G, Ch.G
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 141
Likes (Received): 18

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skybean View Post
I completely agree. Asian pagodas have been built and standing hundreds of years before any of these cathedrals.
Thanks, Skybean! Let's all turn this thread into a racially charged pissing contest!

Can't someone from the Middle East predate everyone with a ziggurat? What about you, Africa? Didn't they build a wall in Great Zimbabwe or something?

Which skin color's gonna win???
Ch.G, Ch.G no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2007, 02:34 PM   #58
Jo
Iron horse rider dlx
 
Jo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Östersund
Posts: 4,274
Likes (Received): 13

^ ??
I think the pissing contest lies in the thread title and the very disputable assumtion that cathedrals would be the original tall structures. A little eye opener doesn't hurt. It's not about skin colors, but about not ignoring structures that are at least as much the original highrises as the cathedrals.
__________________
........................................
010010000110100100100000011101000110100001100101011100100110010100100001

Last edited by Jo; December 31st, 2007 at 02:40 PM.
Jo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2007, 03:06 PM   #59
Ballota
Powered by Jet-A1
 
Ballota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Split
Posts: 32,621
Likes (Received): 23246

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pronaos View Post

3. Kölner Dom (Cologne, Germany) - 516 feet

I love this one!
__________________
< < < < < SPLIT from the AIR > > > > >

__|__
\_______O(-)O_______/
" " "

Ballota no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2007, 03:07 PM   #60
Ballota
Powered by Jet-A1
 
Ballota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Split
Posts: 32,621
Likes (Received): 23246

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unionstation13 View Post
The St.Mary German cathedral in Lockerbie Square, downtown Indianapolis, was built at the turn of the century(19th-20th century) and was one of the many cathedrals that made up the skyline of Indianapolis before highrises were allowed to be constructed.
The St.Mary German cathedral was designed to look like a smaller version of the Cologne cathedral in Germany.

In the downtown area, there are about 9 or 10 other cathedrals or churches, and dozens in the central city.
How tall it is?
__________________
< < < < < SPLIT from the AIR > > > > >

__|__
\_______O(-)O_______/
" " "

Ballota no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu