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Old March 20th, 2010, 02:29 PM   #581
csd
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M1 Dublin - NI border

Folks,

Here are some pics from the M1, starting at the exit for Dublin airport and finishing at the border with Northern Ireland (part of the UK). The road is motorway standard throughout, but a short (approx 10km) section north of Dundalk to the border is all-purpose dual carriageway. You can follow the locations using this map.

1. Heading north just after the start of the M1 (at the M50 interchange) we have the exit for Dublin airport. This section of road is currently being widened to allow two lanes to the airport.


2. The next interchange is only a few km up the road. This junction (3) was added after the road was opened, and provides south-facing slips only for access to/from the town of Swords.


3. Route Confirmation Sign with distances in km. From about 2007, Euroroute numbers have started appearing on these signs (but not yet on direction signs).


4. Advance direction signs are given 2km in advance of junctions.


5. An ITS system (Intelligent Transport System) has been installed on the M1. This provides journey times to/from Dublin, Drogheda, and Dundalk. Unfortunately the text isn't visible in this shot, but it's showing the journey times to Drogheda and Dundalk from here, a point just north of Dublin. This is the only Irish motorway with such a system.


6. In common with all the major inter-urban motorways (except the M9), the M1 is tolled for part of its route. The tolled part is the Drogheda bypass section between Junction 7 and Junction 10. It currently costs €1.90 for cars.


7. The mainline toll plaza on the M1, just north of J7. I'm in the express lane reserved for holders of electronic tags. Although the tolled sections are often operated by different companies, there is inter-working between each firm's tags.


8. The main feature on the M1 is the bridge over the River Boyne. This crosses the river near the site of the Battle of the Boyne, where James I was defeated by William of Orange in 1690.


9. North of Dundalk, the motorway is replaced by a dual carriageway. There is no difference in the standard of road, and the speed limit remains 120 km/h. The area on the left here is used for police/army checkpoints (we're within a km of the border here).


10. This is the last junction before the border. The sign is green as we're on a national route rather than a motorway at this point. The border actually straddles this interchange, with parts of the slip roads being in RoI and parts in NI. The red van/minibus visible parked on the opposite (southbound) carriageway is probably an RoI immigration check. They will stop buses and some taxis coming in from NI and check for illegal immigrants. The common travel area between UK and RoI is only in operation for British and Irish citizens, though in practice there's nowhere for anyone else to report to immigration unless stopped.


11. The border as viewed on the mainline. The international frontier is the point where the hard shoulder markings change from dashed to solid, and there is a reminder that speed limits change to mph. That's it!

Last edited by csd; March 20th, 2010 at 02:34 PM.
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Old March 20th, 2010, 06:43 PM   #582
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Great photos csd. The Ballinsloe - Galway scheme is the best built scheme in the country. As another poster pointed out the road surface is excellent although other new schemes are now being laid with this type of wearing course. I wonder is there anyway we can find what type of wearing courses have been laid over the different schemes over the last number of years?. The only gripe with this is slippery conditions with ice and snow with less grip on the road.
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Old March 22nd, 2010, 08:44 PM   #583
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A further 34km section of the M9 Dublin to Waterford motorway opened today.


Quote:
Further section of M9 between Dublin and Waterford opens



TIM O'BRIEN

ANOTHER MILESTONE in the development of the Republic’s motorway network takes place this morning with the opening of the Knocktopher to Waterford section of the M9.

This new section of motorway allows for improved access to and from the city of Waterford via the new N25 Waterford city bypass at the southern end of the new road.

The opening leaves just one section, between Knocktopher and Carlow, of the M9 Dublin to Waterford motorway to be completed. This section is on schedule to open by the end of 2010.

However, the next inter-urban motorway to be completed is expected to be the M8, between Dublin and Cork. The final section of the M8, between Portlaoise and Cullahill, Co Laois, is ahead of schedule and expected to open in the third quarter of this year.

Today’s opening was initially expected some months ago but was delayed by inclement weather conditions.

The project came in on budget, at €274 million. The new road will link into the Waterford bypass road at Dunkitt, Co Kilkenny, and to the R699 at Knocktopher, also in Co Kilkenny. The road is expected to improve the road safety of, as well as enhance the quality of life for, residents of Knocktopher, Mullinavat and Ballyhale by eliminating through traffic. It is thought it will take about 20 minutes off the journey time between Dublin and Waterford, bringing the driving time to about two hours.

It will also improve the regional access to Kilkenny via the existing N10 and it is hoped it will act as a catalyst for investment in the southeast region.

Irish Times








Pics of the new motorway by Alpha2zulu on Boards.ie




Quote:
Originally Posted by alpha2zulu View Post
Just a couple of quick pics I grabbed today, quality isen't great.
This is at Danesfort looking south, just as you enter the M9
image hosted on flickr

The reverse view,looking north at the N10 junction.
image hosted on flickr

On the approach to Knocktopher with the junction itself just visible in the distance and the road winding on to Waterford.
image hosted on flickr


Kind of hard to believe after all the delays and watching it being built for the past few years that its actually going to open tomorrow. It really is about as far from the old route in design terms as you could imagine. Its just a pity Ireland's biggest cycle lane closes today too!!
Although the Waterford bypass and Suir bridge look the part, I really feel it will be this scheme that will have the largest positve effect on the south east over the years to come. There's been too many stories of potential investors in Waterford turning back to Dublin at Thomastown over the years. Hopefully it will allow the the re-birth of the by-passed villages on the route over time also.



Map


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Old April 3rd, 2010, 07:31 PM   #584
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Quote:
Motorway from Nenagh to Birdhill opens early
TIM O'BRIEN

A 16KM section of the M7, south of the Nenagh bypass, was opened yesterday in advance of anticipated high volumes of bank holiday weekend traffic.

The move extends motorway standard road from Nenagh to Birdhill in Co Tipperary, and removes about 10,000 vehicles a day from a high collision location around Yellow Bridge.

The 16km is part of an overall 28km Nenagh to Limerick section of the M7 which was to have opened late last year. However, the project ran into difficulty in crossing the Annaholly Bog south of Birdhill in Co Tipperary, where pilings have been sinking.

As efforts continue to find a solution to the problem the National Roads Authority made a surprise announcement that it was opening the completed 16km of the road yesterday afternoon.

Barriers on a further 10km of the Nenagh bypass have also been removed, extending motorway standard road from Nenagh to Birdhill.

The authority said it expected a solution to the problem at Annaholly Bog would not delay the opening of the entire M7 by the end of the year.

Traffic heading southbound on the M7 will now filter on to the new stretch of motorway from the existing Nenagh bypass, which has recently been widened to two lanes in each direction.

Southbound traffic will rejoin the existing N7 via a roundabout and a slip road just north of the village of Birdhill.

On the northbound journey the route to the motorway from Birdhill will be signposted.

When completed, the full 28km project will link the Limerick Southern Ring Road with the existing Nenagh bypass.

There will be interchanges on the route at Newport Road, Birdhill, Carrigatogher and Thurles. Also included is a single carriageway link to the main road at Birdhill, and the now complete upgrading of 10km of the Nenagh bypass to dual carriageway standard. The contractor is Bothair Hibernian and it is being overseen by engineers RPS Scetaroute JV.

Yesterday’s opening now leaves just two sections of the M7 to be completed by the end of this year. These are a 12km section between Birdhill and the Limerick Southern Ring Road, and a 34km section between Castletown and Nenagh.

The Republic’s motorway network now extends from Galway on the west coast, via Dublin’s M50, to the Border with Northern Ireland. Motorways are almost complete between Dublin and the regional cities of Limerick, Cork and Waterford as well as between Limerick and Galway.

Mapped on OSM http://www.openstreetmap.org/?lat=52...layers=B000FTF
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Old April 4th, 2010, 02:08 PM   #585
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Good to see this bit open, but that article is a little misleading - the road is actually a year late and the part through the bog (which is collapsing) isnt going to open for god knows how long.
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Old April 6th, 2010, 05:16 AM   #586
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Gotta love those Gaelic signboards....
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Old April 6th, 2010, 07:53 PM   #587
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M9 pictures

Folks,

Here are some pics from the recently opened M9 Danesfort - Waterford section, taken on Sunday. Overall it appears to be a good-quality scheme, blighted by the stupid terminal junction and those unsafe parking areas.

The M9 stretches from the M7 near Newbridge to the N25 just outside Waterford and is toll-free throughout. 88 out of the route's 116 km are complete to motorway standard (with a 120 km/h speed limit), the remaining 28 km is due to open later in 2010.

Enjoy!

1. Here's the sliproad at the start of the motorway section, heading south at Danesfort.


2. Route confirmation sign soon after the start.


3. Bridge & cutting, with parking area ahead. Taken between Danesfort and Knocktopher.


4. Close-up of the parking area. The on- and off-slips aren't very long, and the plastic reflector strips offer no protection for those parked in these glorified laybys.


5. Approaching exit 10, heading south.


6. Approaching exit 10.


7. Exit 10, for Knocktopher.


8. South of Knocktopher.


9. Approaching exit 11, Mullinavat.


10. Route confirmation and distance sign, south of exit 11.


11. Warning of another dangerous parking area ahead!


12. Nothing to stop a HGV careering into a parked car here...


13. Approaching the end of the motorway. Bizzarely, the M9 scheme doesn't connect directly to the N25 Waterford city bypass. Instead, traffic is dumped onto this roundabout, where it then must negotiate another roundabout at the N25 before being able to access Waterford city.


14. The terminal roundabout at the southern end of the M9, with the N25 Suir Bridge visible in the background. A short section of dual carriageway N9 remains to connect this roundabout to the N25 junction near the bridge.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 04:37 PM   #588
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The 22km of M18 under construction from Gort-Crusheen is going well lately. Some CBM has been laid on the southbound carriageway and only 4 more structures remain to be completed. It will tie-in with the Shannon-Ennis section of the M18 when completed and extend the length of the M18 to 44km. Shannon-Limerick is wide dual carriageway but not good enough for motorway restrictions.

Gort-Crusheen updates below:

I passed the scheme yesterday and given what a great morning it was took a few pics. Cragard hasnt change much since I passed over a month ago.



Lahardan overbridge is opened as previously mentioned.


Looking south from Lahardan overbridge, the Crusheen LILO in the distance.


Looking north from the Lahardan overbridge, some CBM layed on the southbound carriageway.



The Tubber-Crusheen overbridge which opened 2 months ago.


Looking south


Looking north, as you can see the CBM is varied and not layed all the way on the southbound carriageway


Looking south from Gortavoher Overbridge


Looking north


This is where were starting to see real progress on from Shanaglish overbridge towards the Gort interchange.

Here is a view of the mainline from the Shanaglish overbridge north


Looking south


Looking south from the Gort-Tubber overbridge and look whats in the distance on the RHS


Looking north from the same overbridge


The mainline below the R460 looking north towards the Gort interchange


Looking south from the R460 overbridge



This is the end of the scheme. It's a local road just after the Gort interchange. It looks a though there will be no structure here instead there is a new local road being built off the second RAB on the gort junction to provide local access.

The Gort interchange


And.......... look whats here a dead end pending on the next scheme to go to construction (Gort-Tuam PPP). Some of it will be used for northbound traffic to get onto the RAB via the LILO.

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Old April 16th, 2010, 01:43 AM   #589
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transport21, Why do you call them 'overbridges'? The word is normally an 'Overpass'.
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Old April 16th, 2010, 01:50 AM   #590
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Highwaycrazy View Post
transport21, Why do you call them 'overbridges'? The word is normally an 'Overpass'.
In Ireland we usually refer to these structures as overbridges, it's on several road notices and local authority interactive brouchures. Other boards.ie users also refer to them as overbridges. Probably drilled into our heads at this stage not to name them anything else!!
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Old April 16th, 2010, 04:20 PM   #591
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It is a bridge and its goes over, the word overpass is American and is rarely used in Britain or Ireland, where the word flyover is more often used.
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Old April 17th, 2010, 07:21 PM   #592
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardmacha View Post
It is a bridge and its goes over, the word overpass is American and is rarely used in Britain or Ireland, where the word flyover is more often used.
Overbridge does not exist in the English dictionary, to my knowledge. Flyover is a little ambiguous. Flying over what?

Overpass would be a little more understandable.
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Old April 18th, 2010, 09:04 PM   #593
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Taken from Wikipedia

An overpass (called a flyover in the UK Ireland and most British Commonwealth countries) is a bridge, road, railway or similar structure that crosses over another road or railway. An overpass structure is one that carries a higher capacity road above a lower capacity road, whereas a structure that permits a lower capacity road to travel above a larger capacity road is an underpass.Capacity is determined as either the number of lanes of travel provided or measured traffic count. In instances of actual or perceived equality between the traffic flows, the term structure can be used.

In North America, a flyover is a high-level overpass, built above main overpass lanes, or a bridge built over what had been an at-grade intersection. Traffic engineers usually refer to the latter as a grade separation. A flyover may also be an extra ramp added to an existing interchange, either replacing an existing cloverleaf loop (or being built in place of one) with a higher, faster ramp that bears left. Such a ramp may be built as a right or left exit.

A pedestrian overpass allows pedestrians safe crossing over busy roads without impacting traffic.

The world's first flyover was constructed in 1842 by the London and Croydon Railway at Norwood Junction railway station to carry its atmospheric railway vehicles over the Brighton Main Lin
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Old April 19th, 2010, 12:03 AM   #594
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Folks,

Here are some shots of the open sections of the M7 Nenagh - Limerick scheme, starting north of Nenagh and finishing at the (temporary) terminus at Birdhill. The section between Nenagh and Birdhill is the latest section of Irish motorway to open.

The section between Birdhill in Limerick has been held up because the newly-constructed motorway started collapsing into the bog in two location. There is currently no timeframe for when this will be fixed

Enjoy!

/csd

1. We start off at the northern end of the scheme, where the junction is being remodelled in conjunction with the M7 Castletown to Nenagh scheme.


2. Approaching J25, which was newly constructed as part of the upgrade of the Nenagh Bypass from S2 to D2M.


3. J25. I have to say the road felt quite tight here passing the truck, with the centre barrier seemingly very close. You definitely notice the narrower (3.5m) lane width on these newer projects.


4. Nenagh bypass. You'd never know this was once S2. Note the Euroroute marker on the RCS.


5. Approaching J26 on the Nenagh bypass.


6. J26, Nenagh south. They must still be working on the centre barrier, as the motorway was down to one lane here.


7. On the Nenagh - Birdhill section, straight after J26, we're now on Ireland's newest (from an opening perspective) motorway.


8. The road passes just north of the Silvermine mountains, so the scenery is quite good.


9. Garda enforcement bay.


10. Cutting.


11. Overpass.


12. Approaching the Birdhill junction, we have another one of these dangerous parking bays. The signage here seems to imply that you're not allowed get out of your vehicle.


13. Approaching J27 (Birdhill).


14. End of the road, for now. Until the problem of the collapsing sections across the bog is solved, the motorway ends here. Note the advisory speed limits, which have black borders rather than the red used by compulsory limits.


15. A short section of S2 links the motorway back to the old N7 at Birdhill.
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Old May 4th, 2010, 03:03 PM   #595
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Hi all,

Here goes first post for me.


Great to see the progress at home. Photo's are great to see. What a pity it will all come to an end at the end of the year.

M9 Waterford is amazing. I allways said it would be an amazing road with all the mountainous areas it traverses.

Does anyone have any photo's of the earthmoving works. would love to see what machines were used and who owned the machines. maybe you guys arent following this stuff so no worries. To get to road formation levels and to start constructing all those bridges on these projects, millions of m3 of earth has to be moved.

Also has crusheen opened yet. from last photo's it was very close.


thanks and keep up the photo's
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Old May 4th, 2010, 03:22 PM   #596
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What a pity about that bog area on the birdhill scheme. We have been lucky to date you might say with all the kms of motorway and dual carraigeway built to date without technical problems like this. It's funny that it was on the tender documents and the locals warned them about it and there advise maybe wasn't listened to.Now the road can't fully open. The nra are right. they aren't going to sign off until they know the foundation will work and will be able to carry the motorway over it.
contractors who i wont name mustn't have piled to a sufficient depth or else the slab was not sufficient for the loading. all piles should be driven until they hit a solid footing or else there can be problems. hopefully they can sort it out. you wouldn't wish that on anyone. similar piling and pile caps were used on newry to dundalk motorway and glen o the downs to carry the roadways over unstable ground, so it has been done before.

fingers crossed they sort it out.
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Old May 4th, 2010, 03:24 PM   #597
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Hows the M3 COMING ALONG NOW. SAW SOME PHOTO'S A FEW MONTHS AGO. WILL BE GREAT WHEN FINISHED. Imagine 60 odd kms through the meath countryside all the way to Cavan. CAN'T WAIT TO DRIVE IT.
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Old May 6th, 2010, 02:38 AM   #598
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nafianna View Post
Hi all,

Here goes first post for me.
Hi and welcome to Skyscrapercity.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nafianna View Post
Great to see the progress at home. Photo's are great to see. What a pity it will all come to an end at the end of the year.
Yeah we have come such a long way in the past few years. It'll be great to have the inter-urbans to Dublin finished. Let's just hope the PPP process is recession-proof enough to see starts on the M20 and M17/18 (they are inter-urban too after all ).

Oh and if you don't already know about it boards.ie's infrastructure forum is another great place for Irish motorway updates.
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Old May 6th, 2010, 01:02 PM   #599
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nafianna View Post
Also has crusheen opened yet. from last photo's it was very close.
Gort-Crusheen will open in late July or during the month of August most likely.
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Old May 6th, 2010, 02:54 PM   #600
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Unofficial plan is for Galway Races 2010, end of July I believe.
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