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Old November 23rd, 2010, 01:17 AM   #781
Uppsala
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Is there any plans in Ireland to change the strange diamond warning signs to normal European triangles?

I still think those diamond signs is strange. Ireland is the only country in Europe with diamond warning signs in American style.
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 01:36 AM   #782
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No I've never heard of any plan. The yellow diamonds go back a long way in Ireland, they were there long before the red triangle became standardised in Europe. Anyway I honestly think they're better (so long as you use symbols and not sentences) so Europe should switch instead.

I think they're better because:
-there's a greater "natural" area for the symbol, you can make the red triangles bigger sure but the diamond shape is a better fit.
-yellow is more reflective and more visible
-there is a greater differentiation between the regulation signs (red and white) and the warning signs, especially from a distance

In any case it doesn't make much practical difference because the symbols used are very similar to those found across Europe.

It's funny though cos in general Irish roads tend to take different practices instead of following a generic European style (e.g. yellow hard shoulder etc..). Maybe it's just to make a generally invisible border more obvious.

On the other hand it could be looking at everything and following the best practice... ()
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 02:16 AM   #783
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I agree actually. The only issue is that continental Europe have that diamond sign which denotes priority, which is a bit too similar to the yellow warning signs. No reason for the UK not to have them though.
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 02:18 PM   #784
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dizee View Post
No I've never heard of any plan. The yellow diamonds go back a long way in Ireland, they were there long before the red triangle became standardised in Europe. Anyway I honestly think they're better (so long as you use symbols and not sentences) so Europe should switch instead.

I think they're better because:
-there's a greater "natural" area for the symbol, you can make the red triangles bigger sure but the diamond shape is a better fit.
-yellow is more reflective and more visible
-there is a greater differentiation between the regulation signs (red and white) and the warning signs, especially from a distance

In any case it doesn't make much practical difference because the symbols used are very similar to those found across Europe.

It's funny though cos in general Irish roads tend to take different practices instead of following a generic European style (e.g. yellow hard shoulder etc..). Maybe it's just to make a generally invisible border more obvious.

On the other hand it could be looking at everything and following the best practice... ()

But i think the problem with the diamond shape is they don't look like warning signs for us who are used to the European style. For us the triangle means warning, and warning is a triangle. When I see the Irish diamond warning signs they don't look like warning signs. They look more like a sort of information signs. For Irish people they are warnings of cause but this can means problems for international traffic.

The triangles in continental European style are red and white in most countries, like in the UK, France or Germany. But some countries have them red and yellow like Sweden and Poland. So if Ireland prefer the yellow colour, they can change to red and yellow warning signs in continental European style.

Northern Ireland has road signs in UK-standard, and that means they have continental European warning signs. That means it's quite strange if someone for example driving from Belfast to Dublin and the signs change from European triangles to diamond shape signs in American style.

Look at this sign. It's a European triangle warning sign but it's yellow. I think this one is better than the diamond shape.

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Old November 23rd, 2010, 06:44 PM   #785
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uppsala View Post
But i think the problem with the diamond shape is they don't look like warning signs for us who are used to the European style. For us the triangle means warning, and warning is a triangle. When I see the Irish diamond warning signs they don't look like warning signs. They look more like a sort of information signs. For Irish people they are warnings of cause but this can means problems for international traffic.

The triangles in continental European style are red and white in most countries, like in the UK, France or Germany. But some countries have them red and yellow like Sweden and Poland. So if Ireland prefer the yellow colour, they can change to red and yellow warning signs in continental European style.

Northern Ireland has road signs in UK-standard, and that means they have continental European warning signs. That means it's quite strange if someone for example driving from Belfast to Dublin and the signs change from European triangles to diamond shape signs in American style.

Look at this sign. It's a European triangle warning sign but it's yellow. I think this one is better than the diamond shape.
The yellow-backed triangle certainly to me is an improvement. Especially if the regulation signs stay white-backed. But it's really not a big deal, I doubt anyone would have any real difficulty getting used to the diamonds. Compare:


Anyway being an island there's nowhere near the same transit traffic to worry about. (NI notwithstanding...) Bit like driving on the left (although that's possibly better too )

Oh yeah and the triangle shape is used for Yield aswell so it's not automatically a warning sign either. The diamond seems like a more logical progression. Circle - Regulation, Triangle - Yield, Diamond - Warning, Octagon - Stop. Makes sense.
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 09:27 PM   #786
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I think there are more strange signs in Ireland than the diamond warning signs. Look here:

This sign looks very strange. I think Ireland is the only country in Europe with this one.



In the rest of Europe a similar sign with blue background means it forbidden to stop. But in Ireland this means something different.
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 09:37 PM   #787
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And now with that economic situation, we will see Irish people walking or riding bikes along motorways soon... (Well, the same as I though Greeks were doing)
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 09:38 PM   #788
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uppsala View Post

I think there are more strange signs in Ireland than the diamond warning signs. Look here:

This sign looks very strange. I think Ireland is the only country in Europe with this one.

In the rest of Europe a similar sign with blue background means it forbidden to stop. But in Ireland this means something different.
It means the exact same as the one with the blue background. Yeah a bit unusual but whatever.

Edit- there is some Vienna convention reason for the blue background, it's used in certain situations. Since Ireland hasn't signed or ratified it though we sign it this way. Although interestingly enough yellow diamonds are equally permitted under it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_...ns_and_Signals

Irish signs: http://www.rulesoftheroad.ie/underst...fic-signs.html

Last edited by dizee; November 23rd, 2010 at 09:49 PM.
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 09:46 PM   #789
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNGL View Post
And now with that economic situation, we will see Irish people walking or riding bikes along motorways soon... (Well, the same as I though Greeks were doing)
The Irish government is broke due to bank bailouts. The Irish people are not poor. There's a difference there.
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 10:12 PM   #790
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Actually thinking about it there are a few changes we should really make.

For one thing the international "No entry" should be used instead of this. Everyone here knows what it means already anyway, sometimes you see it on private property, supermarkets etc.

And maybe we should update the clearway too. Italian style though cos it's cleaner looking (possibly the reason we have a white background now).
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 11:10 PM   #791
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Some nice scenic roads from Google streetview:
[IMG]http://i54.************/2e4c6lw.jpg[/IMG]
Conor pass, Kerry

[IMG]http://i55.************/wvwswn.jpg[/IMG]
Wicklow

[IMG]http://i53.************/1zq9dz8.jpg[/IMG]
Mt Errigal, Donegal

[IMG]http://i52.************/mrz580.jpg[/IMG]
The M8 passing by the Galtee mountains, Cork
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 11:11 PM   #792
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I still think Ireland is very different from the rest of Europe. Here is one more question. What is the difference with these signs? And I know there is a third version with the text TWO WAY TRAFFIC. Is that one different from those? Why do Ireland have 3 versions for one thing?


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Old November 23rd, 2010, 11:16 PM   #793
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There is no difference in meaning.

Why do we have two versions? Well I've only ever seen the first one (I think...). But seriously it's the same sign, one has longer arrows, come on.

As for the "two-way traffic" version, it's to make sure people really got it or something.
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 11:26 PM   #794
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Have a look at pg. 100, diagram A 23:
http://www.unece.org/trans/conventn/...s_2006v_EN.pdf
That must be the reason for the longer arrows in the first sign, following Vienna convention standards. (of course these can be slightly changed in practice)

In fact almost all diagrams used in Ireland are similar to those Vienna convention ones shown in that document. They even have the Irish no-entry sign.
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Old November 23rd, 2010, 11:33 PM   #795
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This is a favorite when I see the signs in Ireland. Very different from other European versions but I think this one have a more beautiful train than we have at the signs in other European countries.

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Old November 23rd, 2010, 11:41 PM   #796
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Ok that one is really unique. I like it too though.

Quite funny how it shows a steam train for an advanced automatic crossing.

I love the unguarded quay one aswell (the diamond shape allows for more water ).

Oh and yeah it is stupid to have so many 2-way traffic signs but it might have been changed over time or there was just a little inconsistency. Wouldn't be unusual. They're essentially the same anyway.
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Old November 24th, 2010, 12:12 AM   #797
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I really don't see a problem with Irish road signs, except for the One-Way road maybe.
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Old November 24th, 2010, 12:38 AM   #798
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielFigFoz View Post
I really don't see a problem with Irish road signs, except for the One-Way road maybe.
For me personally it's no problem with the Irish road signs. I just think it's funny and interesting how different they are sometime from rest of Europe.

Some of the signs like the warning signs looks American diamond signs, but with European symbols inside the diamonds.

Some of the signs are just unique for Ireland, like the signs for railway crossing with the beautiful steam train.

And some signs look very European. Like the signs at the motorways that look very European.

So Irish road signs are interesting. Some parts are just unique, some parts have American style and some parts are very European.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 09:28 PM   #799
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Originally Posted by transport21 View Post
Guys, I know most of you look at google maps to check out Irish roads. Well they have updated the motorway network but loads of mistakes.

The following should be motorway but are down as N roads on the map.
M7: Limerick-Nenagh and Limerick SRR as far as Rossbrien
M9: Carlow-Waterford
M8: Watergrasshill-Dunkettle,Cork

Still missing the following motorways post redesignation phase:
M2, M11, M18 and M20.





----------------------------------------------------------
How about this?



Doesn't the motorway network look a lot better now.
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Old November 27th, 2010, 12:01 AM   #800
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Or www.openstreetmap.org
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