daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 16th, 2011, 01:20 AM   #1001
DanielFigFoz
Registered User
 
DanielFigFoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 4,431
Likes (Received): 894

Uppsala, the old, still common, but less and less common, old Irish give way sign;

image hosted on flickr
DanielFigFoz no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old August 16th, 2011, 01:38 PM   #1002
Uppsala
Registered User
 
Uppsala's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Uppsala, S, Europe
Posts: 654
Likes (Received): 53

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielFigFoz View Post
Uppsala, the old, still common, but less and less common, old Irish give way sign;

image hosted on flickr
Thats nice! And there is a typical Irish no entry sign on the picture too.
Uppsala no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 16th, 2011, 06:17 PM   #1003
spacetweek
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Dublin
Posts: 841
Likes (Received): 260

Quote:
Originally Posted by spacetweek View Post
Work is apparently due to begin in September 2011 on a new 16 km stretch of motorway
Updating myself here, this motorway won't start in September but is still expected to begin before the end of the year.
__________________
Latest information on road building in Ireland, and detailed information on all Irish motorways
http://www.irishmotorwayinfo.com/ine...s/current.html
My proposals for roadbuilding 2015-2040:
http://www.irishmotorwayinfo.com/inex/roads/futures
spacetweek no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2011, 02:11 AM   #1004
Uppsala
Registered User
 
Uppsala's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Uppsala, S, Europe
Posts: 654
Likes (Received): 53

I think Ireland started with motorways very late. The first one was opened in 1983. It was M7 around Naas. But what date that year was it opened?
Uppsala no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2011, 09:43 AM   #1005
Catmalojin
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Dublin, Galway & New York
Posts: 3,915
Likes (Received): 850

Quote:
Dublin roads now safest in Europe, claims authority

RONAN McGREEVY

Fri, Sep 30, 2011

DUBLIN NOW has the safest roads of any capital city in Europe, the Road Safety Authority has claimed. The fatality rate has dropped thanks partly to the controversial 30km/h enforcement zone in the city centre, according to the Garda.

Seven people have been killed on Dublin’s roads so far this year and none since June. By this stage last year, 13 people had been killed.

At the unveiling of a Garda casualty reduction implementation plan, which will include a crackdown on jaywalking, the head of the Road Safety Authority Noel Brett said recent figures showed how successful Dublin had been in reducing the number of road crash victims.

According to the European Transport Safety Council report, Dublin has achieved a 12 per cent annual reduction in casualty numbers in the last 10 years.

Mr Brett said the reduction was for several reasons, including greater enforcement by the Garda traffic corps, the ban on HGV trucks in the city centre and a huge increase in the volume of cyclists, which tended to slow down motorists.

Chief Supt Aidan Reid, head of the Dublin metropolitan area traffic corps, said the 30km/h enforcement zone was a success.

He cited international research which showed that just 5 per cent of those hit at 30km/h were killed, rising to 45 per cent at 50km/h and 85 per cent for those hit by a vehicle at 60km/h.

However, he said it was being implemented as a traffic-calming measure rather than as an enforcement measure. “We’re looking for compliance strictly in that area,” he said. “I believe the 30 kilometre zone has been very helpful in focusing people’s minds as they move into the vulnerable area where pedestrian and pedal cyclists are meeting the car driver.”

It has also emerged that the number of road fatalities in the Republic as a whole is likely to dip below 200 this year for the first time since records began.

To date, 136 people have been killed on the roads in 2011. The equivalent figure this time last year was 151.

Other figures show that nearly 40 per cent of people who are convicted of dangerous driving have a criminal record. Approximately 22 per cent of those killed on the roads are pedestrians.

The Garda will introduce a casualty reduction implementation plan from tomorrow for eight weeks to coincide with October and November, when traditionally there is a spike in collisions in Dublin.

The campaign will be particularly focused on speeding, especially in 30km/h and 50km/h zones.

Gardaí on bicycles will aim to prevent jaywalking, particularly at busy junctions where pedestrians are likely to break the lights.

More than three-quarters of those who are killed or involved in a serious incident in Dublin are so-called “vulnerable road users” – pedestrians, pedal cyclists and motorcyclists.

The campaign will focus on the areas of greater Dublin where there has been the greatest number of fatal and serious injury crashes, at Finglas, Blanchardstown, Ronanstown and Tallaght.

Vulnerable road users will be targeted through education, including the use of safety messages on both Dublin City Council and National Roads Authority variable message signs, as well as more awareness campaigns, most notably an “It won’t happen to me” road safety programme at senior secondary school level.

CAR 'ALCO-LOCKS' - DRIVERS MAY HAVE TO PAY

Drink-driving motorists could be forced to pay for and install a device in their car which would lock the ignition if they were over the limit, according to proposals being considered by the Government.

Road Safety Authority chief executive Noel Brett said the addition of an extra sentencing option for drink drivers could act as a deterrent, particularly to those who had an underlying alcohol problem or who had driven while considerably over the limit.

On Wednesday, MEPs, sitting in Strasbourg, adopted a report which recommended that the so-called “alco-lock” be made mandatory in new cars.

The “alco-lock” would pertain to all new cars and there was no provision of retro-fitting such devices in all cars.

Mr Brett revealed that all the agencies involved in road safety and the Garda were working on the possibility of including the sanction of an “alco-lock” which would could add hundreds of euros to the potential cost for motorists who are over the limit.

He said it was important that the State not be burdened with the cost of fitting such a device.

© 2011 The Irish Times
Great news!
Catmalojin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 28th, 2011, 10:10 PM   #1006
Bothar.G
Registered User
 
Bothar.G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Galway, IRL
Posts: 122
Likes (Received): 1

Some updates regarding the N25 Highway upgrade.










Last edited by Bothar.G; November 18th, 2011 at 04:05 AM.
Bothar.G no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2011, 12:46 AM   #1007
csd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 143
Likes (Received): 49

M50 Junction 5 (Finglas exit)

M50 Junction 5
(Finglas exit)

Here are some pics taken this evening of junction 5 on Dublin's M50. The shots are taken on and around the pedestrian footbridge that snakes its way across the northern side of the interchange. See map here:


http://www.openstreetmap.org/?lat=53.40428&lon=-6.31319&zoom=16&layers=M


The interchange itself was upgraded from a grade-separated roundabout to the partially free-flowing junction shown in these pics. Enjoy!

1. Taken from the northwest corner of the interchange, this shot shows a view of N2 heading north.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

2. Looking east from near the same position the previous shot was taken. The bridge in the middle carries the N2 north to M50 north slip road over the N2 southbound mainline.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

3. Looking south from the northwest corner of the interchange. Note the Garda car parked in the centre where the sliproad mentioned in the previous shot diverges from the N2 northbound mainline. On the extreme right, the M50 north to N2 north slip road is visible.image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

4. Moving onto the bridge, this shot is looking north at the N2.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

5. Turning the camera east, here's a closer look at the N2 north -> M50 north sliproad as it passes over the N2 southbound mainline. The loop visible in the background is the M50 north to N2 southbound sliproad.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

6. Taken from further east along the bridge, this is the view south of the N2 southbound mainline as it passes under the M50 mainline.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

7. This is where the M50 northbound to N2 southbound loop starts. M50 mainline is in the background.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

8. Turning the camera 180 degrees to look west, the is the M50 mainline and the M50 northbound to N2 southbound slip passing over the N2 mainline. You can see the gantry assembly from shot 6.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

9. Looking northwest from the same spot above.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

10. A similar angle to the previous shot, but taken from the pedestrian bridge.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

11. The merge point of the M50 north to N2 south slip and the N2 south mainline.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

12. Looking south at the N2 mainline from the merge point noted in the previous shot.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

13. This is the N2 southbound mainline as it passes under the M50. Traffic heading southbound into the city is stopped by the traffic lights, which controls the junction with the M50 south to N2 south off-ramp. The N2 south to M50 north movement (to the right of this shot) is free-flowing.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

/csd
csd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2011, 12:54 AM   #1008
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,613
Likes (Received): 19405

exquisite photos! Thanks for sharing
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2011, 09:42 PM   #1009
thebig C
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2,218
Likes (Received): 323

Thanks CSD...LOVELY SHOTS!
thebig C no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 7th, 2011, 04:23 PM   #1010
Bothar.G
Registered User
 
Bothar.G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Galway, IRL
Posts: 122
Likes (Received): 1

Construction on the link road connecting Irvinestown road and Tempo road in Enniskillen begun in September. It is hoped this will help relieve congestion that plagues the County Fermanagh town.

Bothar.G no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2011, 01:53 AM   #1011
Highwaycrazy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 141
Likes (Received): 0

Government to shelve €400m Monaghan to Derry road project

http://breakingnews.ie/ireland/gover...#ixzz1dA0FCaqP

The Irish Government is to announce tomorrow that it is shelving plans to pay for the A5 road to Derry. Not surprising considering they would get no benefit from this project, at least no revenue anyway. How angry are Irish Taxpayers at the €19 million already spent on this project?
Highwaycrazy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2011, 02:38 AM   #1012
sotonsi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,562

The county of Donegal gets a shed load of benefit from the A5 - better links with Dublin, better links with Derry. Not to mention how giving the NW of the island better links to Dublin, while the links to Belfast remain rather poor (especially given how the A6 improvements have been delayed as NI could only fund one Derry route, and the southern cash meant that the A5 won), is a good thing for the Republic.

Not to mention how most trade the Republic has is with the UK, so making the economy better of the places right near the border can't be a bad thing? After all it's what the British Government was thinking it was doing by chipping into the <s>Irish-people-enslavement-fund</s> bigger loan to bail you out of a large amount debt, not to mention all the other political wrangling to do with the Eurozone, etc.
sotonsi está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2011, 03:58 AM   #1013
Highwaycrazy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 141
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
The county of Donegal gets a shed load of benefit from the A5 - better links with Dublin, better links with Derry. Not to mention how giving the NW of the island better links to Dublin, while the links to Belfast remain rather poor (especially given how the A6 improvements have been delayed as NI could only fund one Derry route, and the southern cash meant that the A5 won), is a good thing for the Republic.

Not to mention how most trade the Republic has is with the UK, so making the economy better of the places right near the border can't be a bad thing? After all it's what the British Government was thinking it was doing by chipping into the <s>Irish-people-enslavement-fund</s> bigger loan to bail you out of a large amount debt, not to mention all the other political wrangling to do with the Eurozone, etc.
How do you ensure that when the Government needs more revenue, that you can fail the Irish Taxpayers into believing this will benefit their country? So even if it means paying the price of two happy meals every year, it creates a mentality that there is a free ride to be taken from the Irish Taxpayer to benefit people who have no interest in joining Dublin.

If you are referring to the fact if Ireland fails, it will pull Great Britain down. I remember the 1976 bailout of Great Britain when it failed but what did you do since? You just gave bonuses to Banks and now the British have one of the biggest debt to GDP ratios in Europe. FYI, we in the U.S are the biggest contributors to the IMF.
Highwaycrazy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 10th, 2011, 02:25 PM   #1014
sotonsi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,562

I think you'll find the West of Northern Ireland is where the people were often so enthusiastic as to blow stuff up to try and join Dublin.

I was indeed saying that Ireland and the UK are somewhat symbiotic. The Irish taxpayer has already got the burden of the whole European banking industry - their Government bailed out banks, then couldn't repay the loans that it took out to do that, so they got bailed out (for mostly political reasons - the default and decouple policy was the IMF's only one until they 'had to' protect the Euro) by governments (the UK being one), who often can't really pay back the loans that they needed to take out to loan money to the Irish.

I wasn't applauding the borrow-and-bailout economics - it's a horrible thing (did you not see that I called it enslavement?), I was just using it as an example of the mutual dependency of the two countries - we trade a lot, we want each other to be richer so they can buy more of our stuff. The UK (foolishly, given it's own monetary problems), put in more than they had to into the Irish bailout fund, because Ireland is our biggest export market and we need it rich and vice versa. Sadly the Government thought that the best way to do that was to keep Ireland in the Euro - the UK has only not done an Ireland or a Greece (on a far bigger scale) as we dropped out of the ERM and opted out of the Euro.

Bailing out the banks (not giving them bonuses) was 'crony capitalism', a denial of free markets. Of course, the problem was started a while ago when Government interfered and let banks have a special market (not building societies, hence the demutalisation of many building societies in the late 90s) where they could lend out many times more money than they had to give out (savings and investments, etc) and pushed for home ownership, and thus sub-prime mortgages. At least our bailouts were a surprise, rather than an iron clad guarantee from Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae at the outset.

The US has 5 times the population of the UK, 4 of Germany, etc - of course it's the biggest contributor to the IMF! And of course bad fiscal management of 'liberal' states like California is hidden, rather than visible as it is in Europe. And while the size of Government has grown in the UK, in percentage of GDP terms, it's grown at a far quicker rate in America, as has the debt. So you can't pretend to be America lecturing the UK on fiscal and financial responsibility!

But this is getting away from us - back to roads. I understand why the Republic has not co-fund the A5, but think it's wrong to reject it out of hand. Certainly there are higher priorities (getting back to the austerity in the public sector that was proposed before the EU kicked down the door and shouted "we're running the show now" would be a good start, as would the emphasis on infrastructure so that the economy outside the cities can grow) and likely more effective ways of spending money on roads - eg spending the money on the N11 or N25 to improve access to Rosslare, or the N3 or N4 to the North West. However it wasn't a stupid idea for the Republic to help fund the A5 scheme, so that the North built it.
sotonsi está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 12th, 2011, 07:37 PM   #1015
Bothar.G
Registered User
 
Bothar.G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Galway, IRL
Posts: 122
Likes (Received): 1



That mutual dependency is diminishing rapidly because british exports are more expensive and un-competitive than ever, at least on our supermarket shelves anyway. People are changing their lifestyles here - switching to low-price merchandise has become a major issue for british exporters here. The irish market is a price-sensitive market and anyone who exports to this country must appreciate this. 1 pound is no longer equivalent to 1 euro and forty cents. We do not want to peg it back to the british pound. The Euro is there to stay and so are we. The previous government never had the mandate to make that decision on the A5. At present, the N4 and N15 serve Donegal, Sligo and Leitrim reasonably well. Curiously, I have yet to hear a single complaint about these routes not serving the vast majority of Buncranan's. Building a new route would do little, if anything, to stimulate further economic investment because it would cost Irish jobs.
Bothar.G no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 12th, 2011, 08:48 PM   #1016
sotonsi
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,562

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bothar.G View Post
That mutual dependency is diminishing rapidly because british exports are more expensive and un-competitive than ever, at least on our supermarket shelves anyway. People are changing their lifestyles here - switching to low-price merchandise has become a major issue for british exporters here. The irish market is a price-sensitive market and anyone who exports to this country must appreciate this. 1 pound is no longer equivalent to 1 euro and forty cents.
We're trying our hardest to make the pound so utterly worthless that our exports are cheap, but then shooting ourselves in the foot by not doing everything we can to allow the Euro to remain a viable currency - instead that's nosedived at a faster rate than the pound.

When the pound was €1.40, Brits got cheap imports from the Eurozone, and our exports were expensive in the Eurozone. When the pound and euro nearly reached parity, people were driving from Cork to Newry to do the shopping as it was so cheap, as were our exports. The problem with exports is when the pound is worth more Euros, so the problem with British exports is that the pound is not worth €1 anymore, not that it's not worth €1.40 (which would be a worse situation). Irish exports, on the other hand, want £1 to be €1.40.
Quote:
We do not want to peg it back to the british pound. The Euro is there to stay and so are we.
Around election/bailout time a majority of Irish people polled in favour of joining the pound. Even Sinn Fenn were for it. Times change, and our bank doesn't even have the 'one currency to rule them all' dogma that the ECB has to justify it's madcap actions.

If you want to follow the Euro to the bottom of the ocean, then fine. If you want to leave it, or even make an inkling in that direction then be prepared for regime change (see Greece and Italy). Like the Hotel California, or Royston Vasey, you'll never leave...
Quote:
The previous government never had the mandate to make that decision on the A5.
Really? How so?

And do the current government have a mandate for their policy of funding it, but at a much slower rate? I think 25 million in 2015, 25 million in 2016 and more money later is the current plan.
Quote:
At present, the N4 and N15 serve Donegal, Sligo and Leitrim reasonably well.
Except noone in their right mind would take the N4 to go from the Dublin area to Donegal - they'd use the N2/A5/N14 or N3/A509/A46/N3. It's not like there's a 20 foot high fence on the border, stopping all traffic and making it go via Sligo, despite that being a long way round.
Quote:
Curiously, I have yet to hear a single complaint about these routes not serving the vast majority of Buncranan's. Building a new route would do little, if anything, to stimulate further economic investment because it would cost Irish jobs.
Because no one takes those routes for the journeys that would be done by the A5, no one will complain about them being poor...

Will it cost Irish jobs? not really. There's a common market for jobs, and jobs in Derry, or Strabane (or even Omagh) wouldn't be that difficult to get to from Donegal or Sligo. Plus even if they go to British people, then they can afford stuff, which will inevitably involve those cheap Irish goods.

Is it the best use of money that the Republic can spend on roads? Probably not, but given that the money would go a lot further, what with the UK money also involved, it's not a bad idea to fund it. After all you link a large city (and the third largest town in the Republic not already on the DC network, via the N14 2+2, which would be pointless without at least some of the A5, likewise the N15 2+2) with the southern border of the North.

Given the Republic of Ireland is richer than the UK, there's also an element of playing it's part in the economic redevelopment of NI.
sotonsi está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old November 14th, 2011, 07:56 PM   #1017
csd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 143
Likes (Received): 49

M50/M11 interchange

Yet more night shots of the M50 - if anyone's finding these a bit tedious then let me know and I'll try think of a different topic!

M50 J17 (M11 merge)
For today's installment in the "M50 night shots" series, we travel to the southernmost point of the motorway, where it merges with the M11. The section between junctions 14 and 17 was the last to open, in June 2005. The interchange itself is limited access, with freeflowing movements provided for M50 S -> M11 S and M11 N to M50 N only. There are no southbound-to-northbound movements possible; motorists must use J16 for these.

The shots are taken from three overbridges, see the map here:

http://www.openstreetmap.org/?lat=53.22995&lon=-6.1305&zoom=15&layers=M


1. This shot is taken from the R116 overbridge, to the north of the map. The first view is of the M50 mainline looking north towards exit 16 (Cherrywood). This section of the M50 opened as 2x2 lanes, with a large central median available for future widening. The VMS in the middle distance is showing the travel times to junctions 6 and 7. Although you wouldn't know it from the picture, there's a deep valley between where the canteliver sign for J16 is and the bridge visible in the distance. This valley is crossed by the twin Bride's Glen viaducts.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

2. Looking south from the same bridge, the M11N to M11N sliproad crosses over the M50 mainline on a flyover. The M11 northbound is a TOTSO at this exit, so you must leave the M11 to stay on the M11 because the M50 mainline starts at this exit.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

3. Moving south the next series of shots was taken from the footbridge that crosses the M11 immediately south of the M50's terminus, visible in the middle of the map linked above. This shot shows the general view looking north, with the M11 northbound slip diverging left, the M50 mainline straight on, and the M11 southbound merging in on the right.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

4. Here's a tigher shot of the gantry over the M50 mainline, visible from the shot above. Before the construction of the M50, the M11 curved gently right on the level here, terminating at a roundabout approximately 800 metres further north.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

5. The view north, centered over the M11 exit lanes. The 80 km/h speed limit on the off-ramp seems a bit low, given the good geometry of the slip road. The limit on the mainline is 120 km/h.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

6. Turning 180 degrees, here's the view south of the M11 mainline. The section between here and the Bray North junction was widened to 2x3 lanes as part of the M50's construction.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

7. Moving south, the next series of shots was taken from the Crinken Lane overbridge. The first picture is of the view north, with the cantelever for the M11 exit visible. The gantry on the right is the one visible in the distance in photo 6 above.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

8. Swinging the camera south, here's the view of the M11 mainline just north of exit 5 (Bray North). There have been quite a few changes since I first took a photo of this location back in 2004 (see this pic from the international section of cbrd.co.uk). The M11 loses a lane at Bray North interchange, visible in the distance.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

That's all for this update! For next time, I'll try and get some shots of J13/14, which is interesting in that J14 is restricted-access and embedded in the middle of J13.

/csd
csd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2011, 08:35 AM   #1018
Highwaycrazy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 141
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bothar.G View Post
Some updates regarding the N25 Highway upgrade.



The railings could have been re-used elsewhere (assuming they are removeable).
Highwaycrazy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2011, 08:41 PM   #1019
csd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 143
Likes (Received): 49

A trip down the N7

Folks,

Here's a series of pics leaving Dublin along the N7/M7. Starting at the interchange of the N7 and the M50 (the Red Cow interchange), we head southwest in the direction of Waterford. Apologies, but the quality isn't as good as usual: dirty windscreen and low winter light have conspired to reduce the sharpness.

The key map:
image hosted on flickr

Key map by csd75, on Flickr

1. The R110 outbound, as it approaches the Red Cow interchange. This interchange was formerly a grade-separated roundabout, but was upgraded to partially free-flowing as part of the M50 upgrade scheme.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

2. We head straight through the traffic lights visible in the previous shot, and into one of the original bridges from the roundabout junction. The M50 is directly below us here.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

3. Traffic from the M50 northbound to N7 southbound slip merges in from the left as we approach the exit for the Luas (tram) P+R and Clondalkin. The N7 starts here, having been de-trunked inside the M50 ring in the 1990s.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

4. Three traffic lanes and a bus lane between the Red Cow and Newlands Cross.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

5. Newlands Cross, the last set of traffic lights remaining between Dublin and Cork/Limerick/Waterford. There is currently a PPP project to grade-separate this out to tender, but it is proving difficult attracting finance in the current economic climate. The plans are for the N7 mainline to be carried over this intersection on a flyover bridge.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

6. Once through the traffic lights at Newlands Cross, we can accelerate to 100 km/h. Note the recently-installed VMS.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

7. Next exit is for the grandly-titled Outer Ring Road (R136). Designed to take some traffic off the M50, the dual carriageway route runs between Lucan (N4) and Tallaght (N81), and is dotted with roundabouts and traffic lights. The northern end of the R136, near Lucan, runs behind existing housing, who objected to the prospect of having heavy trucks thundering past their gardens. To appease them, HGVs are diverted off the northern section and on to the R113, and the N4 isn't signposted from the N7!
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

8. Exit 2, complete with sculpture, which was installed last week.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

9. Exit 3, for Citywest business park, comes upon us immediately afterwards.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

10 Exit 3a is only accessable southbound.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

11. Exit 4 for Saggart and Newcastle.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

12. The RCS after exit 4 is cunningly camoflaged by a tree.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

13. The LILO for Rathcoole South is un-numbered, and only accessable from the southbound carriageway.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

14. The first of three sets of services available on the N7 southbound between Rathcoole and Naas.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

15. Junctions 5 and 6 serve smaller villages. This part of the N7 was upgraded from 2x2 with traffic lights and median crossings to 2x3 lanes with grade separation in 2005. When originally opened in 1968, this was the first major section of rural dual carriageway in the Republic of Ireland.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

16. Kill north exit. This village isn't an exhortation to homocide, rather Chill means church in the Irish language, so forms part of many placenames.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

17. A warning that there are no online services ahead on the M7, M8, or M9.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

18. Kill South.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

19. Approaching exit 9 for Naas, and the start of the motorway section.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

20. We lose a lane here, but the speed limit increases to the motorway default of 120 km/h.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

21. This portion of the M7, the Naas bypass, has the distinction of being the first section of motorway to open in the Republic of Ireland, in 1983. It was resurfaced last year, hence the good condition of the pavement.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

22. Junction 10 marks the end of the original M7 Naas bypass.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

23. The next section of M7 to open was in 1994, when the Y-shaped M7/M9 Newbridge/Kilcullen link was opened, extending the improved road southwards.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

24. This gantry is more recent though, having been installed in the last year or two.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

25. Approaching exit 11, where the M9 diverges. We're going to follow the M9 south towards Waterford.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

26. Start of the M9. No online services here either, though there are plans for an MSA south of Newbridge.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

To be continued...
csd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2011, 08:52 PM   #1020
DanielFigFoz
Registered User
 
DanielFigFoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: No fixed abode
Posts: 4,431
Likes (Received): 894

Great photos!
DanielFigFoz no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium