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Old September 30th, 2012, 01:17 AM   #1141
csd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bothar.G View Post
The Glen of the Downs nature reserve where they tried to bulldoze over local residents starting in 1997. They were met with resistance by demonstrators. Some big businesses wanted this Highway but it passes close by the flood plains.
Hmm, where to begin...

The only demonstrators I remember were the usual crusty types who took to living in the trees in the valley, and they weren't local. As a result of the protests, the land take was reduced. As someone who used to visit both before and after the upgrading, I can honestly say the place seems no worse off. In fact it's better without the congestion.

Flood plain? It's a valley, not a plain, and it doesn't flood.

Where do you get the idea that the dual carriageway upgrade was pushed by big business? Truck traffic represents only 3.7 per cent of vehicle movements on this road. Its main use is commuting from dormitory towns in north Wicklow and day trippers from Dublin heading to the beaches in summer.

The simple fact is that there used to be serious congestion through this valley, with cars and trucks idling while stopped for long periods of time. I'm sure Chris can come up with the evidence to prove how this is much more polluting than traffic flowing freely at 80 - 100 km/h. Anyway, the AADT here is 45,000 vehicles, so there's no other option but a dual carriageway.

/csd
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Old September 30th, 2012, 01:31 AM   #1142
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bothar.G View Post
Too slow in my opinion In Ireland, we all violate traffic rules every minute. Civil disobedience is common here and the cops rarely enforce rules, except maybe the wacky races:
Thankfully your opinion doesn't set the speed limits!

There were four fatalities in that 5 km section of road in the years 2005 - 2009, plus another seven serious accidents resulting in 10 casualties.[1]

80 km/h is not too slow for that particular section of road.

/csd

[1] Reference: http://www.rsa.ie/RSA/Road-Safety/Ou...ad-Collisions/
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Old September 30th, 2012, 02:17 AM   #1143
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Well, in that case the lower speed limit could possibly contribute to extra pollution within that nature reserve (slow moving traffic increases pollution).

I don't think you would say "usual crusty types" to the protestor's faces. The false media and the local Mayor only seemed to care about the business lobby groups. The vast majority of the demonstrations were supported locally.

The main channel and flood plains of the River Dargle run near this route. Disturbingly, Bray Town Council apparently went so close to giving a permit to developers wanting to build on the floodplain downriver from a community - eight of Bray's councillors happily agreed to it. Ironically, these type of people are in government today.
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Old September 30th, 2012, 11:56 AM   #1144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bothar.G View Post
Too slow in my opinion In Ireland, we all violate traffic rules every minute. Civil disobedience is common here and the cops rarely enforce rules, except maybe the wacky races:

Those f*ckers need locked up and the key thrown away.

Making trotters run on pavement like that and putting themselves and everyone around them in danger.

Utter scum.
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Old September 30th, 2012, 04:14 PM   #1145
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WTF is going in here?! They're charging up the the wrong side of the road for a start!
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Old September 30th, 2012, 05:28 PM   #1146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CairnsTony View Post
WTF is going in here?! They're charging up the the wrong side of the road for a start!
These are Irish Travellers, who have been known to illegally block public roads and run sulky races.

Extremes like this aside, however, behavior on Irish roads has improved dramatically in the past decade. For example, speeding on motorways has declined from 31 per cent of passenger cars surveyed in 1999 to 16 per cent in 2011. The introduction of penalty points in 2001 is credited with much of this, as has increased enforcement, and a crackdown on drink driving.

The enforcement side has also been increased. The number of detections for speeding rose by 66 per cent between 2010 and 2011, despite the fact that overall speeding fell.

The overall result of this has been a reduction in road deaths from 411 in 2001 to 186 in 2011. In terms of deaths per distance travelled, Ireland now has the third-safest roads in the EU, behind Sweden and the UK. The old generalisations about Ireland being a nation of disobedient scofflaws don't hold anymore, at least where road traffic is concerned.

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Old September 30th, 2012, 06:04 PM   #1147
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It's all a horse and pony show of facts, csd. The main reason speeding dropped dramatically from 2010 is because of the steep rise in commodity prices here. Gasoline is now 44% more expensive since 2009. People are now driving slower to save fuel. We have less cops on the roads here than ever before. That would suggest there's something else at play.
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Old September 30th, 2012, 07:20 PM   #1148
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bothar.G View Post
It's all a horse and pony show of facts, csd. The main reason speeding dropped dramatically from 2010 is because of the steep rise in commodity prices here. Gasoline is now 44% more expensive since 2009. People are now driving slower to save fuel. We have less cops on the roads here than ever before. That would suggest there's something else at play.
Can you provide some evidence for your claim that the reason speeds have fallen is because of the rising cost of fuel? A quick search yields an American study that found very little correlation: a $1 rise in the price of a gallon of petrol led to an average reduction of only 0.27 mph.[1]

Can you provide evidence for your claim that there are fewer Gardai on the roads than 10 years ago? There was no national Traffic Corps 10 years ago, and even if numbers were cut earlier this year (which won't have had an impact on statistics for the years under discussion here), remember that enforcement isn't only with the Garda now -- there are 45 privately operated mobile camera vans around the country, introduced at the end of 2010. More people are being caught for speeding when speeding levels as a whole are reducing, which suggests to me that enforcement has improved.

Reducing the number of fatalities on the roads was always about the "Three Es": Engineering, Enforcement, and Education. Perhaps now we can add a fourth E, for Economics (the price of fuel). So yes, there are other factors at play, but none of them take away from my earlier point: speeding in Ireland has reduced significantly in the past decade, therefore Irish drivers are increasingly more law abiding than they were. You're not going to convince me otherwise with vague or tangential assertions.

/csd

[1] http://www.ncsu.edu/cenrep/workshops...uments/VOT.pdf
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Old September 30th, 2012, 09:32 PM   #1149
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The main reason for less traffic fatalities is of course also the construction of a large motorway network. Motorways are the safest road type possible, while the old two-lane busy national roads were usually the least safe road type.
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Old October 1st, 2012, 02:35 AM   #1150
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One of the forumers from Boards.ie asked me for help with uploading pictures from the construction of the flyovers in Cork.
Here they are:


































Thanks for Martin.
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Old October 1st, 2012, 03:08 AM   #1151
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That overpass is huge.
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Old October 1st, 2012, 03:43 PM   #1152
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bothar.G View Post
It's all a horse and pony show of facts, csd. The main reason speeding dropped dramatically from 2010 is because of the steep rise in commodity prices here. Gasoline is now 44% more expensive since 2009. People are now driving slower to save fuel. We have less cops on the roads here than ever before. That would suggest there's something else at play.
People choose their speed based on how big a hurry they are in, not petrol prices.

Deaths and injuries have fallen hugely due to a number of factors:
- New Motorway network
- Decrease in speeding
- Decrease in incidence of drink-driving
- NCT car check has removed unsafe old vehicles from the roads
- Penalty points encourages good driving behaviour and tracks bad behaviour
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Latest information on road building in Ireland, and detailed information on all Irish motorways
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My proposals for roadbuilding 2015-2040:
http://www.irishmotorwayinfo.com/inex/roads/futures
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Old October 1st, 2012, 04:41 PM   #1153
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You don't need to repeat what others have already said.
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Old October 1st, 2012, 05:02 PM   #1154
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200 km/h on a new Irish Highway:


Sports Cars Racing on an Irish Highway:


Car Racing on the Naas Road:


Crazy Irish Truck Drivers:


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Last edited by Bothar.G; January 29th, 2013 at 10:01 PM.
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Old October 2nd, 2012, 05:10 PM   #1155
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I have a question about these reinforced embankments. How long do they last? Especially comparing to normal soil embankments of viaducts.
They use metal stripes inside. Is it stainless steel?
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Old October 2nd, 2012, 06:25 PM   #1156
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Maybe Chris can help clarify?

It looks like a 'spill-through abutment' - they seem to be fitted similar to a puzzle.
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Old October 2nd, 2012, 06:33 PM   #1157
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These embankments have become increasingly popular throughout Europe in recent years. I don't know their exact specifications. Maybe they have a form of cathodic protection
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Old October 3rd, 2012, 12:36 AM   #1158
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Thanks and great pictures csd. I quoted them here. Hope you don't mind


http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...9#post96022589
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Ireland forum is here

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/forumdisplay.php?f=1596
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Old November 3rd, 2012, 01:33 AM   #1159
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Heading west

Heading west

Folks,

A series of pictures from a trip west last weekend.

Includes:
  • The M4/M6 split near Kinnegad
  • The Athlone bypass after its refurbishment
  • The N6 around Galway
  • Some Connemara scenery

Part 1 covers the M4/M6 split and the Athlone bypass.

1. First the route map
image hosted on flickr

Route map by csd75, on Flickr

2. We haven't got to exit 10 yet, but we're already signing exit 11!
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

3. I think this is the only VMS on the M4, approaching the M6 split.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

4. Junctions 10 and 11 are very close. Quite a few people were missing the exit for the M6 and Galway because it came so quickly after the Kinnegad exit, so the signage was revised to what you see below.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

5. Signage at exit 10.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

6. As we travel under exit 10's overbridge, the M4/M6 split appears.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

7. Galway left, Sligo right.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

8. Butterfly sign at the exit gore.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

9. Exit 2 on the M6 comes up very quickly. Three exits in quick succession means you have to keep your wits about you if you're meaning to leave the motorway near Kinnegad!
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

10. No services on the M6! There are plans to build an online MSA near Athlone, but they've stalled due to the economic crisis.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

11. The M6 east of Athlone features a number of these dangerous parking areas.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

12. We fast-forward a few junctions to exit 7, for Moate.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

13. Typical exit gantry sign on Irish motorways.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

13. Less than an hour to Galway now.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

14. Going through a foggy patch near Athlone.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

15. Tourist info sign.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

16. Green patches!? There's a gap in the M6 around Athlone -- the original Athlone bypass dual carriageway wasn't reclassified as motorway, so this is effectively a terminal junction, hence the green patches.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

17. Shoddy design -- the sign should really cover the whole support assembly or else having a grey backing board provided.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

18. An inconspicuous end of motorway regulation sign, followed by some slightly more obvious 100 km/h speed limit signs.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

19. Exits 8 to 12 come up in quick succession, forming the 1990s-era Athlone bypass.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

20. The Athlone bypass has recently been refurbished, and now sports a new NJCB median, new signage, and a new surface.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

21. Autumn in Westmeath.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

22. New traffic lights were installed at the top of the exit slips as part of the upgrade works.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

23. Exit 10 comes up quickly.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

24. Some of the signs are quite obscured by vegetation.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

25. These cantelever gantries were installed as part of the refurbishment works.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

26. Exit 10's on-slip becomes exit 11's exit slip.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

27. Approaching the Shannon bridge, we see advance signage for exit 12.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

28. The road rises to give a clear navigation span under the River Shannon.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

29. Bridge over the River Shannon. At 360 km, this is the longest river in the UK and Ireland and is 130 metres wide at this point.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

30. On the western bank of the Shannon and the province of Connaught.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

31. Exit 12 for Roscommon.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

32. Blue patches -- the motorway section starts again after exit 13.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

33. Motorway restrictions ahead.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

34. Exit 13 is the last junction on the Athlone bypass.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

35. A rather battered Motorway restrictions begin sign.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

36. The motorway between Athlone and Ballinasloe was let as a single scheme, and opened in July 2009.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

37. The Athlone - Ballinasloe scheme is unusual for Ireland in that it uses steel crash barriers rather than concrete or wire rope.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

Part 2 to follow...
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Old November 3rd, 2012, 02:01 AM   #1160
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Around Galway

Part 2: Around Galway

1. Route map
image hosted on flickr

Screen Shot 2012-11-02 at 22.46.37 by csd75, on Flickr

2. Approaching the final junction of the (current M6).
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

3. The motorway regulations end here, with dual carriageway extending to the original Galway bypass.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

4. There are plans for an Outer Galway Bypass, which would diverge right at this point and continue the motorway around to the north of Galway. The NRA say it's suspended due to funding issues, but there's also a legal challenge outstanding on part of the scheme.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

5. So for the moment, the motorway ends here, and we must negotiate the existing Galway bypass to get around to the N59, our destination today and gateway to the scenic area of Connemara.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

6. No change to the road's geometry, but the speed limit drops to 100 km/h. This section is incorrectly shown as M6 on the Google map.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

7. Shortly afterwards, this roundabout marks the end of the Ballinasloe - Galway scheme, which opened in December 2009.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

8. Get in lane!
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

9. If you have an electronic toll tag, this is the first place you'll have to yield since leaving Dublin.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

10. We've turned right at the roundabout and are now on the old Galway bypass. Not sure when this was completed.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

11. This junction was originally a roundabout, but was "upgraded" to a signal-controlled crossroads recently.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

12. At off-peak times, it's not much of an upgrade as I had to wait at red lights much longer than I'd have had to wait at the previous roundabout. Maybe it makes more sense at peak hours.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

13. We arc around the northeast of Galway city.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

14. Another junction recently "upgraded" from a roundabout to a signal-controlled crossroads.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

15. The speed limit drops to 50 km/h here as it's the end of the dual carriageway.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

16. There's a section of S4 before another short dual carriageway section. 50 km/h feels very slow here.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

17. No upgrade for this junction yet!
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

18. Urban dual carriageway. No room to upgrade this to anything decent, hence the need for the Galway City Outer Bypass.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

19. Back to S4 as we cross the River Corrib.
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

20. These traffic lights mark the end of the N6. The N59 is straight ahead (and right, but no right turn allowed here).
image hosted on flickr

Untitled by csd75, on Flickr

Part 3 to follow...
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