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Old June 16th, 2013, 03:30 PM   #1221
csd
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M50/M1 pics

Folks,

A series of photos showing the route between M50 junction 4 (Ballymun) heading north towards the M1, including the new D3M section between junctions 3 and 4.

1. M50 northbound approaching junction 4.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6042 by csd75, on Flickr

2. Approaching junction 3, the interchange with the M1. All M1/M50 movements are free-flowing, with access to the Malahide road requiring use of the roundabout.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6045 by csd75, on Flickr

3. Five lanes for this short section approaching the interchange.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6046 by csd75, on Flickr

4. Swinging left towards the M1. The right-hand two lanes are actually for the M50 Dublin Port tunnel, but they're not signed M50 for some reason.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6050 by csd75, on Flickr

5. Slip road from the M50 to the M1.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6053 by csd75, on Flickr

6. Onto the M1 mainline now.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6057 by csd75, on Flickr

7. Another (brief) five-lane section.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6059 by csd75, on Flickr

8. The M1 between junctions 2 and 3 was upgraded to D3M a couple of years ago.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6069 by csd75, on Flickr

9. The section between junctions 3 and 4 has just recently been upgraded to D3M. It was previously two lanes in each direction and heavily congested at the commuting peak hours.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6073 by csd75, on Flickr

10. Approaching the estuary at Broadmeadows.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6076 by csd75, on Flickr

11. Travel time display approaching the estuary.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6080 by csd75, on Flickr

12. This original 1 km ADS survives amidst the new gantries.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6082 by csd75, on Flickr

13. No room for a hard shoulder across the estuary now that it has been widened to 3 lanes each direction.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6085 by csd75, on Flickr

14. Lane drop at junction 4, Lissenhall.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6095 by csd75, on Flickr

15. Only two lanes each way from here to the border, but still plenty of room in the central reservation for widening.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_6100 by csd75, on Flickr
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Last edited by csd; June 16th, 2013 at 04:07 PM. Reason: Fixing Flikr's broken-ness.
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Old June 16th, 2013, 04:08 PM   #1222
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Does anyone know why Flickr break links just minutes after creating them for you?

Very annoying!

/csd
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Old September 1st, 2013, 04:08 PM   #1223
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The M2: Ireland's shortest motorway

Folks,

A few pics from a short spin from the M50 northbound to the N2/M2.

At just 13 km long, the M2 is Ireland's shortest motorway. It was built to bypass the commuter town of Ashbourne, and was completed in May 2006.

1. The route map -- total distance 28 km
image hosted on flickr

M2 route map by csd75, on Flickr

2. On the M50 northbound at junction 6, we're staying on the mainline.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1699 by csd75, on Flickr

3. These signs were blocked by the overpass in the previous picture, so the pull-through signs were added to the bridge in the last year or so.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1700 by csd75, on Flickr

4. On the M50 mainline under junction 6.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1701 by csd75, on Flickr

5. The on-slips from J6 merge with the M50 mainline.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1705 by csd75, on Flickr

6. The M50 and M1 motorways have an ITS that gives you the travel time to junctions up ahead.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1710 by csd75, on Flickr

7. We're going to leave at exit 5.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1714 by csd75, on Flickr

8. We'll keep left.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1716 by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

IMG_1720 by csd75, on Flickr

9. Now we're on the N2 mainline. The first 4 km are all-purpose (ie not a motorway), as to have made this section a motorway would have cut off access to the old N2 for prohibited traffic (cyclists, learner drivers, etc), so this section was left out of the motorway reclassifications of 2010.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1722 by csd75, on Flickr

10. This exit has is un-numbered.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1725 by csd75, on Flickr

11. Motorway ahead. The vegetation could do with being trimmed here!
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1726 by csd75, on Flickr

12. The motorway section begins after exit 2.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1729 by csd75, on Flickr

13. The 120 km/h limit starts while we're still on the non-motorway section.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1730 by csd75, on Flickr

14. Another job for the hedge cutter.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1736 by csd75, on Flickr

15. That's better!
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1740 by csd75, on Flickr

16. Non-motorway traffic must leave here.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1741 by csd75, on Flickr

17. Some 4 km from the M50, the motorway section starts. These km-posts are being installed every 500 metres across the major inter-urban routes as part of the NRA letting out the maintenance of the motorway network to private sector companies. See here for details.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1747 by csd75, on Flickr

18. Tiger-tail merge at M2 J2 northbound.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1748 by csd75, on Flickr

19. Although the N2 is the direct route to Derry, most traffic uses the M1 as far as exit 14. Apart from the 20 km nearest to Dublin, the N2 is S2 all the way to Ardee. The bridge at Slane is particularly dangerous.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1751 by csd75, on Flickr

20. Across the county border into Meath.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1755 by csd75, on Flickr

21. Approaching the M2's only intermediate junction.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1756 by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

IMG_1759 by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

IMG_1763 by csd75, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

IMG_1767 by csd75, on Flickr

22. Exit 3 for Ashbourne -- the reason this motorway was built.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1769 by csd75, on Flickr

23. North of exit 3. More work for the hedge cutter!
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1773 by csd75, on Flickr

24. Southbound traffic gets a VMS, northbound traffic has to make do with a Garda speed check ramp!
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1776 by csd75, on Flickr

25. The M2 may be small, but it's perfectly formed. SOS phones are installed along its short length.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1780 by csd75, on Flickr

26. Apporaching the northern terminus of the M2.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1781 by csd75, on Flickr

27. The speed limit drops first to 100 km/h, then 60.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1786 by csd75, on Flickr

28. Just 17 km from the M50 and 13 km from the start of the motorway, it's all over. The N2 continues as an S2 to Slane and Ardee. Some sections north of Ardee have been upgraded to 2+1.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1792 by csd75, on Flickr
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Old September 1st, 2013, 07:09 PM   #1224
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csd View Post
Folks,

A few pics from a short spin from the M50 northbound to the N2/M2.

At just 13 km long, the M2 is Ireland's shortest motorway. It was built to bypass the commuter town of Ashbourne, and was completed in May 2006.

21. Approaching the M2's only intermediate junction.
image hosted on flickr

IMG_1756 by csd75, on Flickr
Nice.

Do the services symbols mean that if you take this exit you'll find that sort of thing on the local roads near it (like a "fuel-food-lodging" sign on an American Interstate) or is there a European-type motorway-services area that happens to be accessed from the same exit ramp? If it's the former - i.e., if it just means facilities in the area - that's very unusual in Europe, isn't it?

For that matter, why's the sign brown?
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Old September 1st, 2013, 09:28 PM   #1225
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post
Nice.

Do the services symbols mean that if you take this exit you'll find that sort of thing on the local roads near it (like a "fuel-food-lodging" sign on an American Interstate) or is there a European-type motorway-services area that happens to be accessed from the same exit ramp? If it's the former - i.e., if it just means facilities in the area - that's very unusual in Europe, isn't it?

For that matter, why's the sign brown?
It means the former -- a US-style meaning of "fuel - food - lodging". Europen-style online motorway services are signed like this:

image hosted on flickr

MSA sign by csd75, on Flickr

Offline services are always signed brown to distinguish them from online ones.

/csd
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Old September 1st, 2013, 09:34 PM   #1226
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Offline/online services? What does that mean? That you have to log in, share and like before refueling and eating?
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Old September 1st, 2013, 09:38 PM   #1227
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csd View Post
It means the former -- a US-style meaning of "fuel - food - lodging". Europen-style online motorway services are signed like this:

image hosted on flickr

MSA sign by csd75, on Flickr

Offline services are always signed brown to distinguish them from online ones.

/csd
Thanks. (But the whole exit sign's brown - thought that meant something to do with tourism....)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Road_UK View Post
Offline/online services? What does that mean? That you have to log in, share and like before refueling and eating?
Now you're just being silly.
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Old September 1st, 2013, 09:44 PM   #1228
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I never heard of it... And I live on roadside services...
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Old September 1st, 2013, 09:51 PM   #1229
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Well, I don't use those terms but it's clear, in context, what's meant:

Online - services like a British "motorway services" or a french aire de service that are only accessible from the motorway and only exit back on to it (except for maybe an employees-only connection to the local roads to accomodate locals who work at the services)

Offline - the typical American situation where you've got a couple of hotels and a few restaurants on local roads near a junction with a freeway. (Since, generally speaking, what we're calling here online services only exist, in the U.S., on toll roads).

I sincerely thought you were joking. :-)
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Old September 1st, 2013, 09:54 PM   #1230
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No, I genuinely never heard of it. This phrase is most certainly not used in Britain...
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Old September 1st, 2013, 10:17 PM   #1231
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Well that's probably because there are lots of service stations on British motorways, unlike on Irish ones.
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Old September 1st, 2013, 11:29 PM   #1232
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The terms online and offline services are used quite a lot in Ireland. As Penn's Woods says:
  • "online" services are for those only accessible directly from the motorway. There are only three sets of these in the country so far: two on the M1 (near Lusk and Castlebellingham) and one on the M4 (near Enfield).
  • "offline" services are reached by leaving the motorway, and are accessible by local traffic as well as motorway traffic. There are a few of these springing up now that the NRA-funded online MSAs haven't progressed as quickly as originally planned.
There are signs on the M6, N7 (see example below), M8, and M9 warning drivers that there aren't any online services.

image hosted on flickr

No online services by csd75, on Flickr
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 08:50 AM   #1233
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Ah. So in the UK areas like South Mimms, Thurrock, Peterborough, Cambridge, Donnington Park etc would be offline...
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 12:27 PM   #1234
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Think of it another way. There may be insufficient traffic along the A303 to justify 24 hour services along the road. On the other hand there may be sufficient demand for 24 hour services in nearby Yeovil...so the travellers on the A303 would be informed that they can get their petrol, pot noodle and poo if they detour a bit at that point.

Long distance routes in SW England/NW England, Wales and Scotland would often fall into this category where traffic at night is low....but there is traffic nevertheless. Offline services should not be signed save where they are 24 hour, the signage is supplied by the state and is driving business into the stations for free.

The ability to safely stop, particularly at night, is paramount.
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 12:35 AM   #1235
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Road_UK View Post
Ah. So in the UK areas like South Mimms, Thurrock, Peterborough, Cambridge, Donnington Park etc would be offline...
If they're accessible from non-motorway roads, then they're offline.

An Irish example of an offline motorway services is at Junction 14 of the M7 (Mayfield):

https://maps.google.ie/maps?q=Mayfie...y+Kildare&z=14

MSAs that are only accessible from a motorway are online services.

There are only three of these in Ireland at present: Lusk, M1, Castlebellingham, M1, Enfield, M4.
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 10:43 AM   #1236
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So, 120 km/h is the highest speed limit in Ireland. That's 75 mph. I like the road sign. Below the number 120 there is "km/h" to clarify that this is NOT mph! In continental Europe that would be plain 120, no "km/h" below it. Then again, who would have thought that the speed limit in Ireland could have been 120 mph??
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Old September 4th, 2013, 01:49 AM   #1237
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So, 120 km/h is the highest speed limit in Ireland. That's 75 mph. I like the road sign. Below the number 120 there is "km/h" to clarify that this is NOT mph! In continental Europe that would be plain 120, no "km/h" below it. Then again, who would have thought that the speed limit in Ireland could have been 120 mph??
They have km/h on speed limit signs in Brazil too:



And in Mexico:

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Old September 5th, 2013, 03:00 PM   #1238
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Quote:
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No, I genuinely never heard of it. This phrase is most certainly not used in Britain...
Plenty of influence and terminology on roads in Ireland is actually American not British. E.G. Warning signage is USA-style not European, slips are onramps/offramps (example), LAR (Local Access Road) is called a frontage road, junctions are often called exits, and the traffic lane capacities manual is based on the American one (example, section 1.5).
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Last edited by spacetweek; September 5th, 2013 at 03:07 PM.
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Old September 5th, 2013, 03:03 PM   #1239
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyline_ View Post
So, 120 km/h is the highest speed limit in Ireland. That's 75 mph. I like the road sign. Below the number 120 there is "km/h" to clarify that this is NOT mph! In continental Europe that would be plain 120, no "km/h" below it. Then again, who would have thought that the speed limit in Ireland could have been 120 mph??
It varies by nation, e.g. Belgium does say "km/h". But most countries don't because there's no confusion.
Strangely, since the UK is now (since 2005) the only European country that uses mph, you'd think they would say it on the signs!
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Old September 5th, 2013, 03:11 PM   #1240
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spacetweek View Post
Strangely, since the UK is now (since 2005) the only European country that uses mph, you'd think they would say it on the signs!
Like UK gives a bleep about the rest of Europe...
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