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Old October 18th, 2013, 06:47 PM   #1261
ChrisZwolle
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http://www.n7n11.ie/

A new website for two major projects, the N7 Newlands Cross interchange near Dublin (the last traffic lights between Dublin and the motorways to Limerick / Cork / Waterford.)

The other project is the M11 Arklow to Rathnew motorway project.
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Old November 7th, 2013, 06:59 PM   #1262
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The Minister for Transport has been Tweeting...

Quote:


@campaignforleo
Considering a trial of a new road sign. Brighter agus gaeilge nios feiceali. Cad a ceapann sibh? pic.twitter.com/0OZ7CPMXJk
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Old November 7th, 2013, 08:08 PM   #1263
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Quote:
gaeilge nios feiceali. Cad a ceapann sibh?
Nár cheart dó "Gaeilge níos Feiceálaí ...Cad a cheapann sibh?" a rá, an pleidhce!

The Irish placenames are not unclear to the extent that all the signage needs replacement country wide. Yes they use a completely crap italic font.

There are more pertinent issues to address such as manifestly INCORRECT Irish place names on some existing signs, and not just on Motorways either. Wonder when he will announce a spot of badly needed roadbuilding instead of a cosmetic signage replacement exercise. After all the IMF finally pissed off this morning.
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Old November 7th, 2013, 11:19 PM   #1264
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#248
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Originally Posted by Catmalojin View Post
Cad a ceapann sibh?
Tá an idé níos fearr ná na comharthaí a bhíonn ar na bóithre an lá seo... Níos suimiúla freisin, agus uathúil.

But returning to the language that I can actually speak properly, I think that the new signs are doing something that, with the current government practices, is inevitable - putting the Republic's two languages together at the same level (font size and style) and yet highlighting Irish (yellow font) at the same time.
The font choice itself is not half-bad, but I would without a single question carry out distance-to-speed-to-reading-ratio tests on the motorways and other high-speed roads. The font seems fine for closer distances, but I reckon it could be illegible at further distances.

The Irish roads have a lot to look forward to if this comes through. I like it personally anyways. Finally a break-off from the British-styled signs.

EDIT: vv blame focal.ie. Idé is supposed to mean idea. Anyway, I said it, "...that I can actually speak properly".
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Old November 8th, 2013, 02:56 AM   #1265
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Originally Posted by TranslatorPS View Post
#248

Tá an idé níos fearr ná na comharthaí a bhíonn ar na bóithre an lá seo... Níos suimiúla freisin, agus uathúil..
Eh??? "Idé" ???

The yellow colour is mad, utterly non standard as signage goes. The same font and font colour should be used but the Irish lettering should be a tad smaller in most of the country and a tad larger than the English lettering in the parts where Irish is spoken.

And above all else the Irish language placenames should be correct, many are plain wrong.

But resigning the entire country at considerable expense simply should not be a priority over removing bad bends, the singularly illiterate Minister has withdrawn funding from a number of safety schemes on national roads in the past year or so.
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Old November 8th, 2013, 02:01 PM   #1266
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Bit more on this:
Quote:
New road signs with parity for Irish may be introduced

Éanna Ó Caollaí

Last Updated: Friday, November 8, 2013, 10:24



The current M8 sign (left) shows how Irish is ‘squeezed’ and abbreviated to fit the limited space. The proposed design uses colour differentiation of languages and the Turas test typeface.


The proposed design uses colour differentiation of languages and the Turas test typeface.

The Department of Transport has asked the NRA to trial run newly-designed road signs that would give the Irish language parity with English on the country’s roads for the first time in the history of the State.

The new design, which uses the test ‘Turas’ typeface and colour differentiation to highlight both languages, is based on recommendations outlined in a study commissioned by Irish language organisation Conradh na Gaeilge.

Conducted by Royal Society of Arts Fellow Garrett Reil, the study was aimed at discovering more efficient and safer means of delivering information to drivers as well as delivering the promise of equal status for Irish.

The existing system employs the British Transport typeface which was designed by graphic designers Jock Kinneir and Margaret Calvert to standardise the UK road network in the 1960s. Considered a design classic, the typeface was later adopted in Ireland. However, the adopted Irish version saw the introduction of italics for Irish place names, “directly” thwarting the design intent of the original Transport typeface, according to the report.

It found that not only does current Irish road sign design not follow best international practice but that Irish typographic characters are poorly drawn - rendering place names in Irish less visible than in English.

The report also identifies problems faced by older drivers through a phenomenon known as halation where light cast upon reflective lettering causes letter shapes to obscure thereby impairing the ability of the road user to read the sign.

Citing the iconic Transport typeface and how it has become synonymous not only with the British transport system but is also is part of “the look of Britain”, the report emphasises the cultural impact road sign design can have on society and how it can unintentionally become a visible expression of national identity.

News of the possible change to the country’s road sign design first emerged on social media yesterday afternoon when Mr Varadkar used Twitter to gauge public reaction to the proposition.

Tweeting an image of a prototype sign depicted alongside a sign currently located along the M8 motorway in Cork, Mr Varadkar said: “Considering a trial of a new road sign. Brighter agus gaeilge nios feiceali. Cad a ceapann sibh?”

Conradh na Gaeilge discussed the contents of the report with Mr Varadkar on Tuesday and Mr Varadkar subsequently asked the NRA to consider trialling it on a pilot basis.

“I like the new design and I do think there should be parity between Irish and English where it matters, like road signs that people see every day,” Mr Varadkar said yesterday.

“But it’s a bit like an election poster: it’s only when you put it on a road and drive past that you really know whether it works.

Conradh na Gaeilge general secretary Julian de Spáinn welcomed the minister’s response and described this week’s meeting at the Department of Transport as “very positive”.

The new signs, if adopted, will not incur additional cost to the State as they will only be introduced to replace decommissioned signs or when new signs need to be put up.

The introduction of a new design would also require legislative change as existing road sign legislation stipulates that road signs must give priority to English place names.

© 2013 irishtimes.com
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Old November 8th, 2013, 03:03 PM   #1267
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I think we need to decide as a nation (not just by asking Conradh na Gaeilge) whether Irish should actually be in primary position on the signs, before commissioning expensive redesigns.
The situation on the ground would indicate that it should not.
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Old November 8th, 2013, 03:33 PM   #1268
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sponge_bob View Post
The yellow colour is mad, utterly non standard as signage goes.
Scotland, Greece and Cyprus disagree, using yellow on signs to denote one language, and white to denote another (on dark backgrounds like blue or green anyway. I don't think Greece and Cyprus have white signs, but Scotland uses green for Gaelic on them).

It's only non-standard as far as signage goes if you don't look outside Ireland.

For numbers it is used on green signs throughout the UK and Ireland - why not blue as well?
Quote:
The same font and font colour should be used but the Irish lettering should be a tad smaller in most of the country and a tad larger than the English lettering in the parts where Irish is spoken.
Now there's something which is utterly non-standard as signage goes!
Quote:
But resigning the entire country at considerable expense simply should not be a priority over removing bad bends, the singularly illiterate Minister has withdrawn funding from a number of safety schemes on national roads in the past year or so.
That's not what is being proposed - merely a trial to see whether this sign design is better. I'd imagine a very gradual roll out if agreed to change standards (just like km distances) - all new signs, certainly, with perhaps a roll out on the motorway/primary network over the course of several years (please get rid of those ugly gantries!) if proved to be really popular.

---

I wholeheartedly support the concept of changing the representation of bilingualism from the awful allcaps and illegible italic to something else. Two colours is probably the best way to do it, too. However, there's something not right about the mock up - it's not that the blue is too dark (though it is), or that the yellow Irish text is far too strong (due to the blue being too dark, I reckon) - it just looks poorly designed!
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Old November 8th, 2013, 10:50 PM   #1269
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#249
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Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
Scotland, Greece and Cyprus disagree, using yellow on signs to denote one language, and white to denote another (on dark backgrounds like blue or green anyway. I don't think Greece and Cyprus have white signs, but Scotland uses green for Gaelic on them).

It's only non-standard as far as signage goes if you don't look outside Ireland.(...)
Proof of concept, by the way >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:A87-bilingual.jpg >> in Scotland. Except on green background like this it looks more orange than yellow, to be honest.
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Old November 9th, 2013, 01:49 PM   #1270
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Thanks, I put some other examples of how other countries do it in this post, posted just before on the "Ireland's new motorway network" thread, and didn't want to duplicate. Didn't bother trying to find a Scotland example though
Quote:
Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
Certainly some element of distinguishing the two languages is needed. Some countries use a slash, Ireland (and those that use non-Latin alphabets, eg Greece) use different alphabets, some use colour (eg Scotland, Greece, Cyprus). The Welsh, confusingly, don't have any distinction (and also swap order whether it's a Welsh-first area, or an English-first area).
The Greek sign shows what UK/Ireland proper sign yellow and blue, rather than that really dark blue, look like.
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Old November 10th, 2013, 12:04 AM   #1271
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As a non-Irish speaker I use English when navigating in Ireland and I have to say that the new signage seems broadly clear to me. I can still concentrate on the white information ignoring the yellow one.
For that reason I would keep R-road number and M-number in white and only keep the Irish names in yellow.
One thing I don't get is changing the junction number. The new yellow design is harder to read. Why changing it? Just to make things more different from Britain? That sound childish to me.
Ironically many people in Poland would like to see signage resembling more of the German one even if our historic relationship is almost as bad as between Ireland and Britain. We just like good design. Don't mix politics with road and signage design.
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Old November 10th, 2013, 02:42 AM   #1272
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Tell that to the Belgians. Their entire signposting is a political witch hunt.
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Old November 10th, 2013, 12:13 PM   #1273
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As long as they dont waste money re-signing the network I am not too worried about it. Priority is to crack on with the 'bad bends' program (accident prone locations) if they find themselves with a few spare millions.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 03:33 PM   #1274
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geogregor View Post
Ironically many people in Poland would like to see signage resembling more of the German one even if our historic relationship is almost as bad as between Ireland and Britain. We just like good design. Don't mix politics with road and signage design.
The new km-speed limit signs and most of the elements of the new gantries were based on German road signage.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 07:28 PM   #1275
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spacetweek View Post
The new km-speed limit signs and most of the elements of the new gantries were based on German road signage.
I didn't know that.

What I meant is that change just for the sake of change doesn't make sense. I think that is the case with the junction number on the new design.
Can anyone explain why? Maybe I just don't get it.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 09:52 PM   #1276
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Irish signs are alright. Certainly understandable, I don't mind how they are. The new proposal looks fine as well, actually I think it does look better. I also don't see why they changed the junction number though.
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Old November 12th, 2013, 10:15 PM   #1277
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I think all that needs to be done is to keep to the same basic design using Transport font and simply go from capitals and italics to using lower case lettering in two simple colours. This would keep the broad format of the signage the same but allow a gradual roll-out.

The new sign is just far too different in colour, symbol as well as font and contrasts far too much with the current types of signs. It will end up with a messy mix of signs for many years,
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Old November 18th, 2013, 03:15 PM   #1278
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Hi folks,

I'm new to this forum but I've been reading the various threads from different countries. I've always had an interest in road building and especially here in Ireland it has been good to see that we finally have a half-decent motorway network in place even though we were very late to the game. It's great seeing the posts here not just by people in and from Ireland but of those of you interested from elsewhere. I've read a good half of the topic so far, including the last 5 pages or so.

After coming across this thread, I dug up some footage I shot while driving in 2010 and 2011 and put it on YouTube so that I could share it here to bring something to the table. The footage is alright, I shot it using €220 camcorder that I bought in 2009 so it's not even close to perfect. Pity the camcorder is broken since 2011 so this is all I have to-date worth sharing as all I have now is a Nexus 4 and its camera isn't very good either. You should definitely kick it up to 1080p if you're going to watch it. Check out the descriptions for more info and links to the route taken on Google Maps.

I love this route as it cuts down my travel time quite significantly and even though it's tolled, there's money being saved by using less fuel in taking it over the next quickest route through the outskirts of the city center. I know it's old news but better late than never!

Drive: N18 / M20 / N21 (Nighttime) - Through the Limerick Tunnel south from Shannon, Co. Clare:



Full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EMArQ3COZA&hd=1

Drive: N21 / M20 / N18 / N19 (Daytime) - Through the Limerick Tunnel north from Adare, Co. Limerick:



Full link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8_RT5rCouA&hd=1
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Old November 21st, 2013, 07:19 PM   #1279
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Quote:
Speed Limits Review body publishes report & recommends new appeals system

Thursday 21st November 2013
  • 80kmh signs on narrow country roads will be removed
  • New ‘rural speed limit’ signs will be introduced to replace them
  • New appeals mechanism for inappropriate speed limits
  • Every speed limit will be audited every five years
  • ‘Silly signs’ which may encourage inappropriate speeds will be removed
  • Road work speed restrictions will be limited to construction period
  • Variable speed limits, average speed detection, and in-car satnav speed warnings will be piloted
  • The Speed Limits Working Group has published its recommendations to reform the speed limit system and ensure that every speed limit in Ireland is both safe and sensible.
It recommends a new appeals mechanism for inconsistent speed limits, the removal of misleading 80kmh speed limits on narrow country roads, and the end of ‘silly signs’ in inappropriate locations. Every speed limit in the country will be audited every five years by the National Roads Authority or the local authority, and speed limit guidelines will become binding. The goal is to ensure that the speed limit on any given road is a fair reflection of the road conditions.

The Working Group was set up by Minister Varadkar and asked to address inconsistencies in Ireland’s speed limits, which can vary significantly between roads and counties, and even on the same stretch of road. It was also asked to find the most appropriate speed limit for country lanes, which currently have a default limit of 80kmh, regardless of road condition.

“I set up this Working Group to ensure that speed restrictions everywhere are both safe and sensible. Everyone has come across speed limits which are either too high or too low, and which don’t seem to make sense,” Minister Varadkar said.

“This detailed report sets out a new approach, and the Department will now work with the NRA, local authorities, the Gardaí, and the AA to implement its recommendations. I also want to thank the Working Group for producing such a comprehensive study. If people are going to respect speed limits, then we need to ensure that speed limits respect the motorist. But we must also ensure that every limit is safe and sensible.”

Conor Faughnan of the AA said: “Irish Motorists have been hugely supportive of road safety policy in recent years. AA members are continually telling us that they support speed enforcement but that many speed limits across the country are set incorrectly. The updated policy announced today is a huge step forward in addressing those anomalies. It will allow for a consistent and rational approach across the entire network which is very necessary and very welcome.”

Summary of report’s recommendations

  • A new Appeals System will be put in place to address inconsistent speed limits. This will allow interested parties or members of the public to appeal a given speed limit to the local authority. The authority must consider the issue within a given timeframe. If dissatisfied with the local authority response, the appeal can be escalated to a review body. This will comprise an independent board of experts and would meet regularly to assess individual cases. That body will assess the speed limit against the requirements of the Guidelines for the Application of Speed Limits, and will be empowered to instruct a local authority to change a speed limit if it is found to be inappropriate.
  • 80 kmh signs on narrow rural roads will be replaced with a generic sign that does not display a numeral. The limit will remain at 80kmh but the new sign will be the ‘black circle with diagonal’ which is in use internationally under the Vienna signage convention and which was used in Ireland prior to 2004. That sign means that the driver must use their own judgement but must never exceed 80kmh in any event.
  • The Road Safety Authority will run an awareness campaign on the new rural speed limit signs, and other measures, and will update the Rules of the Road.
  • The National Roads Authority and local authorities will review and update speed limits on a five year cycle to ensure appropriate fit and compliance with the Guidelines. The Department of Transport is currently mapping every speed limit in the country on to a computer database.
  • So-called ‘silly signs’ - such as a 100kmh speed limit on a dangerous corner where a lower speed would be more appropriate – will be removed. Inappropriate ‘repeater’ signs are already being removed.
  • The Guidelines for the Application of Speed Limits will be improved and made binding.
  • A voluntary pilot of in-car speed warnings, where drivers can choose to be warned by their satnav system if they exceed the speed limit, will be offered to motorists.
  • Trials will be run of variable speed limits which can be adjusted according to weather conditions, the volume of traffic, the time of day, or the day of the week.
  • Average speed limits will be introduced on motorways or other long-distance fixed roads to determine whether a vehicle has driven faster than the maximum speed limit over a given length of road.
  • The rules for the setting of temporary speed limits to allow for road works will be updated. This will allow City and County Managers to apply speed limits at road works more responsively, and flexibly - for example to apply lower limits only while works are underway.
The Department of Transport will appoint an existing official to oversee the implementation of the report’s recommendations.

Link to full report of Speed Limits Review:
http://www.dttas.ie/roads/publicatio...it-review-2013

Ends

Department of Transport, Tourism & Sport:
01 604 1090 / 01 604 1087
...
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Old December 20th, 2013, 02:40 PM   #1280
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Quote:
Dual carriageway to replace perilous stretch of Sligo road

Marese McDonagh

Last Updated: Friday, December 20, 2013, 08:30


A Co Sligo stretch of the main Dublin-Sligo road which is often described as the most dangerous section of roadway in the country on account of 30 deaths on it in recent years is set to be replaced by almost 15kms of dual carriageway.

Campaigners who have erected 30 white crosses on the verges of the existing 12km stretch of road, each one marking the scene of a fatality, have welcomed the “major breakthrough”.

Sligo County Council yesterday confirmed that it had submitted the N4 Collooney to Castlebaldwin proposed road development to An Bord Pleanála for planning approval.

Local pressure group

This follows a marathon campaign by the N4 Action Group which has drawn national attention to the stretch of road, dubbed “the most dangerous in the country” by Sligo coroner Dr Desmond Moran.

Bernard Mulhern, a spokesman for the group, predicted that the new dual carriageway would become a reality within five or six years.

Anthony Skeffington, senior engineer with the council, said the development was “one of the biggest and most complex infrastructural projects ever proposed for the county”.

Earlier this month the National Roads Authority gave the local authority approval to publish the compulsory purchase order and environmental impact statement documentation and to submit the project to An Bord Pleanála for planning approval.

It has been estimated the project could cost €60 million.

© 2013 irishtimes.com
From Sligo County Council:
Quote:
N4 Collooney to Castlebaldwin Proposed Road Development

In early December 2013 correspondence was received from the NRA conveying approval to publish the Compulsory Purchase Order (CPO), Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Natura Impact Statement (NIS) documentation and to submit the N4 Collooney to Castlebaldwin Proposed Road Development to An Bord Pleanála for planning approval. The publication of Statutory Notices in Local and National press on the 19th and 21st December 2013 commences this process and represents a significant Milestone for this project.

Background To The Project:
The N4 Collooney to Castlebaldwin Project has progressed from Phase 1 Feasibility through to Phase 3 Preliminary Design. As part of this process, various route options were considered for the alignment of the scheme, following the standard public consultations process a Preferred Route was identified and adopted in 2002.

The preferred route was identified based on the findings of a Constraints Study (2000) and a Route Selection Study (2001) both of which were undertaken by Sligo County Council. Public consultation was undertaken in 2001 and again in 2002. The route selection report was completed in May 2002 and adopted by members of Sligo County Council in July 2002 and subsequently approved by the NRA. Throughout these stages appropriate statutory and non-statutory bodies, as well as local interest groups and the public were consulted.

Project Location:
The N4 National Primary Route is part of the East/West road corridor linking Ireland’s largest transportation node (Dublin) with the largest transportation node in the North-West (Sligo). It measures c. 34.8km in County Sligo of which c. 11.6km between Sligo Town and Collooney is Type 1 Dual Carriageway with c. 8.8km south of Castlebaldwin having already been realigned to Standard Single Carriageway standard.



The Proposed Road Development (As indicated in image above) is the remaining portion of the N4 in Co. Sligo requiring improvement and measures approximately 14.71km in length passing through the townlands of Collooney, Toberbride, Mullaghnabreena, Ardcurley, Cloonamahan, Doorly, Knocknagroagh, Drumfin, Cloonlurg, Carrowkeel, Carrownagark, Kingsbrook, Aghalenane, Ardloy, Springfield, Tawnagh, Cloonymeenaghan, Sheerevagh, Cloongad, Drumderry, Castlebaldwin, Cloghoge Upper and Cloghoge Lower. The road type will be Type 2 Dual Carriageway tied into the existing network to the south via a section of Standard Single Carriageway.

Project Description:
The Proposed Road Developmentcomprises inter-alia:
  • 14.71km of Type 2 Dual Carriageway;
  • New side roads (including in some cases parallel links) and upgrading of existing roads;
  • One at-grade roundabout junction on the mainline;
  • One Compact Grade Separated Junction on the mainline;
  • Three at-grade roundabout junctions on side-roads;
  • Four road overbridges;
  • Six road underbridges;
  • Two river bridges;
  • Culverts and associated diversions of existing minor watercourses and drainage ditches;
  • All the necessary drainage works associated with the proposed road development;
  • The diversion of services and utilities;
  • Earthworks operations including the management of spoil generated by the proposed road development;
  • Environmental mitigation works;

In order to provide access/egress from the local roads/dwellings along the online upgrade section a single carriageway parallel access road is proposed to the east of the existing N4 between Toberbride and Doorly. The access road connects to the eastern arm of the Toberbride Roundabout and the existing N4 at Doorly. The access road connects to the eastern arm of the Toberbride Roundabout and the existing N4 at Doorly. Dwellings on the western side of the N4 can access the parallel road via a proposed overbridge at Toberbride and a proposed underbridge at Doorly (via a further western parallel road).

Need for the Proposed Road Development:
The original basis for the current proposal was highlighted in a report produced by the NRA, entitled The National Road Needs Study (NRNS) in 1998. This study assessed the adequacy and performance of the national road network on the basis of the ability of existing roads to deliver a quality level of service consistent with the efficient movement of traffic.

The development of this road development has been identified in the following documents:
  • National Spatial Strategy for Ireland 2002-2020: People, Places and Potential;
  • National Development Plan 2007 -2013;
  • Infrastructure Investment Priorities, 2010-2016;
  • Regional Planning Guidelines for the Border Region, 2010-2022;
  • Border, Regional and Western Regional Operational Programme 2007-2013;
  • Smarter Travel. A sustainable Transport Future (2009-2020);
  • Forfás Regional Competiveness Agenda, (2010);
  • Sligo County Development Plan, 2011-2017;

There are significant traffic flows along the route, sections of very poor carriageway alignment, frequent junctions with local road access and numerous properties with road frontage and these have resulted in large numbers of recorded collisions and a very poor road safety record.

The need for the Proposed Road Development is set out in detail in the EIS.

Objectives of the Proposed Road Development:
The provision of the realignment provides the following key benefits:
  • To improve the N4 route to modern day standards including the provision of safe overtaking and appropriate road width;
  • To provide a high quality road for strategic routes with reserve capacity for future demand;
  • To assist in improving the competitiveness and efficiency of the economy both locally and nationally;
  • To reduce travel times and improve access to the north-west region;
  • To provide a corridor of transport infrastructure that will encourage and support existing investment and employment in Sligo and the Northwest.
  • Improve transport infrastructure for local traffic;
  • To improve safety along the existing roads and at junctions/accesses;
  • To reduce environmental and social impacts on the local residents and communities along the existing N4.
  • To support government plans and policies in relation to transport and spatial development in the West of Ireland.

Description of Statutory Procedures:
The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Proposed Road Development is prepared as part of the application for development consent. The EIS contains information on the likely significant environmental effects (both positive and negative) of the Proposed Road Development and the measures proposed to mitigate those effects so as to allow a fully informed decision to be made by An Bord Pleanála.

The EU Habitats Directive requires an ‘Appropriate Assessment’ (AA) to be carried out where a plan or project is likely to have a significant impact on a Natura 2000 site. Natura 2000 sites include Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and Special Protection Areas (SPAs). Appropriate Assessment is referred to in Articles 6(3) and 6(4) of the EU Habitats Directive. As part of this process a previous direction issued by An Bord Pleanála requested that a Natura Impact Statement (NIS) be prepared for the Proposed Road Development.

A Compulsory Purchase Order (CPO) has also been developed for the Proposed Road Development. As part of the CPO, 181.5 hectares of land are proposed to be acquired. 22 Public Rights of Way and 8 Private Rights of way are proposed to be extinguished.

The CPO, EIS and NIS will be on Public display until Friday 28th February and submissions or observations may be made in writing to the An Bord Pleanála. Further details on this matter are outlined in the Public Notices.

Following the period for submissions/observations, it is likely that An Bord Pleanála will hold an Oral Hearing which is usually held approximately 8-10 weeks after the submissions closure date (28th February 2014). Following this the Board, having considered any possible objections made and the report of the Inspector who conducted the Oral Hearing, may confirm/approve the Proposed Road Development with or without modifications or may annul/refuse to approve it.

If the Proposed Road Development is confirmed by An Bord Pleanala, compensation procedures with landowners, which can take a number of years, can commence. While this is being carried out, Tender Documents necessary to procure a Contactor will be carried out. However this is all subject to approval and funding from the National Roads Authority.

This Proposed Road Development is one of the biggest and most complex infrastructural projects ever proposed to be developed in County Sligo. Nationally, it is also one of only two major road schemes that have got approval to proceed to planning in 2013.

View Compulsory Purchase Order (CPO) for the Proposed Road Development

View Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Proposed Road Development

View Natura Impact Statement (NIS) for the Proposed Road Development
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