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Old January 25th, 2009, 04:12 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by essendon bombers View Post
Do any roads cross the border between left-side driving HK and right-side driving China?

If so, do drivers from either side get confused after crossing the border and drive on the wrong side of the road?
Yes, there are vehicle border crossings, but inbound and outbound traffic are separated at the checkpoint and emerge on the other side flipped, so drivers don't notice the change.
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Old February 6th, 2009, 09:01 PM   #42
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Drivers shun HK$6.8b road link Route 8 carries under a sixth of its capacity
5 January 2009
South China Morning Post

Low use of the city's newest multibillion-dollar road link is raising fears that taxpayers may have invested in a huge white elephant. Nine months after it opened, the HK$6.8 billion Route 8, which links Sha Tin with Cheung Sha Wan via two tunnels, is carrying less than a sixth of the vehicles it was designed for.

The Transport Department has no plans to introduce new bus routes using the link despite having built two 100-metre bus bays, each capable of servicing 10 routes. And although the link was aimed at reducing congestion on other routes between Sha Tin and Kowloon, a minimal initial effect has since vanished.

Route 8 - which will eventually link the eastern New Territories with Tsing Yi and the airport via another project under construction, Stonecutters Bridge - passes through the 2.1km Eagle's Nest Tunnel and the 1km Sha Tin Heights Tunnel, which have dual three-lane carriageways.

In May 2002, the government told Legco's public works subcommittee the link would ease traffic congestion in the Lion Rock, Tate's Cairn and Shing Mun tunnels and Tai Po Road.

It was estimated the peak-hour volume could be cut by 15 per cent in the Lion Rock Tunnel and 27 per cent in the Shing Mun Tunnel.

But between March and October, a daily average of just 17,200 vehicles used Route 8 - 14 per cent of the design capacity of 120,000. By contrast, more than 83,200 vehicles used the Lion Rock Tunnel daily and 48,390 vehicles used the Shing Mun Tunnel.

In the first four months after Route 8 opened, traffic fell 5.9 per cent in the Lion Rock Tunnel and 9.1 per cent in the Shing Mun Tunnel. But the trend did not last and traffic volume rose in July and September.

Sha Tin district councillor Yeung Cheung-li said he did not believe the new route would lure drivers away from the Lion Rock Tunnel. "I am worried that when the tunnel is undergoing major renovation, the traffic congestion will get much worse," Mr Yeung, chairman of the council's traffic and transport committee, said.

However, transport experts are more ready to give the new route the benefit of the doubt. "It is normal that for new road links, it takes some time for traffic to build up," former Transport Advisory Committee member Leung Kong-yui said. "The link to Tsing Yi has not yet been completed."

He said he expected that when connecting routes such as Stonecutters Bridge were in operation, more vehicles heading for Lantau or the airport would use Route 8.

The Route 8 project includes bus interchanges at the exits of the Eagle's Nest Tunnel, but they will remain unused in the foreseeable future.

Mr Yeung was puzzled as to why bus bays had been provided when the government had no plan to introduce new bus routes.

"The Sha Tin District Council has been pushing the Transport Department to introduce new bus routes that run through Route 8 to Kowloon West. This would help reduce the vehicle load on the Lion Rock Tunnel and Tai Po Road," Mr Yeung said. "But the Transport Department has been firm in response that there is no demand for new services."
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Old February 8th, 2009, 04:12 PM   #43
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Eagle's Nest Tunnel







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Old February 9th, 2009, 04:47 AM   #44
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Awesome project, looks amazing!
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Old February 9th, 2009, 08:00 PM   #45
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Awesome pics looks amazing indeed!
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Old March 7th, 2009, 06:18 PM   #46
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Flyover must be rebuilt for noise barrier, says engineer
28 February 2009
South China Morning Post

A noise barrier could only be fitted on a section of the Ferry Street flyover if it was torn down and rebuilt, a government engineer said yesterday.

Residents have been demanding a barrier to shield them from the noise and pollution that will be generated by the Central Kowloon Route.

Chow Chun-wah, the Highways Department's chief engineer on major works, said the flyover was not designed to sustain extra structures.

"There are limitations with the flyover's design. Even if noise barriers can be set upon it they will only be short ones, and it will not be able to solve [the noise] problems for residents in high-rises. If we really have to do it, we may need to tear down the flyover for reconstruction," he said.

Mr Chow was addressing the concerns of residents in Prosperous Garden - a housing estate in Yau Ma Tei that is separated from the route's construction site only by the flyover.

The HK$10 billion project is aimed at cutting the journey time between Yau Ma Tei and Kai Tak. The 4.7km route, which includes a 3.9km tunnel, is intended to link the West Kowloon Reclamation area and the future Kai Tak development. It is expected to ease heavy traffic in Mong Kok and To Kwa Wan when it is completed in 2016.

Three buildings, including the Yau Ma Tei clinic, Kowloon government offices and a multi-storey car park, will have to be demolished to make way for the route. The old wing of Yau Ma Tei police station - a grade three historic monument - will be preserved but the fate of its less valuable new wing and attached structures has not yet been determined.

In a meeting of the Legislative Council's transport panel yesterday, the department's project manager, Chow Ying-shun, said it had pushed the tunnel's proposed portal much farther west from residential clusters. It will also hide the tunnel's ventilation building inside a slope and retrofit a noise barrier on sections of Gascoigne Road in Jordan.

But Miriam Lau Kin-yee, of the Liberal Party, said the department should not give up on the problem of the Ferry Street flyover.

"You used to say that it was technically impossible to retrofit noise barriers on the Kwun Tong Bypass as well, but eventually you did it."

Democratic Party legislator Andrew Cheng Kar-foo said if it was really impossible to install noise barriers, the government should consider other options, such as fitting noise-proof windows in the homes of affected residents.

The department said it would continue to study options and the project would undergo an environmental impact assessment.

Meanwhile, the Transport and Housing Bureau said it was not yet convinced that it should be made mandatory for all children to wear seat belts on school buses.

The bureau's principal assistant secretary, Rosanna Law Suk-pui, said in the same panel meeting that a study into overseas examples had failed to find a city with such laws.
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Old March 18th, 2009, 06:15 PM   #47
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Sai Kung council won't extend talks on wider highway
18 March 2009
South China Morning Post

Residents' demands for more public consultation on expanding part of Hiram's Highway into a four-lane road were turned down by Sai Kung District Council yesterday.

The expansion is part of a HK$303 million government initiative to improve transport links from Sai Kung to Ta Ku Ling.

More than 70 people - including Sai Kung residents and concern group members - turned up at yesterday's council meeting to lock horns over the development of the highway.

Groups opposing the expansion questioned whether more traffic would lead to overdevelopment in Sai Kung, while villagers supporting the project said they needed a solution to a traffic congestion problem that had been troubling them for more than a decade.

Hiram's Highway runs from Sai Kung's town centre to Clear Water Bay Road at Ta Ku Ling. The four-lane part ends at Ho Chung at the moment, and the Highways Department plans to extend it to Pak Wai, past the Marina Cove estate, in the first stage of the improvement project.

Construction work is scheduled to begin at the end of next year and be completed in 2013.

Council members who vetoed a proposal for a reassessment of the first stage of the expansion project said more consultations would simply delay construction work.

The Highways Department is still considering different options for the second phase of the project - from Pak Wai to Sai Kung's town centre.

Marina Cove residents said they saw no point in widening the highway when the public remained divided over whether the four-lane highway should continue straight into the town centre.

The chairman of the estate's incorporated owners corporation, Cheng Shui-tai, said the extension would move the traffic bottleneck from Ho Chung to Pak Wai if the four-lane highway stopped there.

"There is no justification. Even if we sacrifice our rights, I can't see how traffic can be improved," he said.

Friends of Sai Kung, an organisation which opposes the four-lane project, said the district's low-density environment would be destroyed by the inflow of traffic.

"What we are concerned about is the possibility of over-development," group vice-chairman James Wong Ming said.

"If we fail to preserve the environment here, how can we develop ecotourism?"

District Council chairman Ng Sze-fuk said the expansion work was crucial for developing the district's tourism and economy, and improving the transport network in the Eastern New Territories. "Sai Kung is an attractive place. If more people are coming here but there aren't any supporting facilities it could be a big problem," he said. "You can't stop people visiting Sai Kung."

Mr Ng said the council had consulted residents living along Hiram's Highway, but it was impossible to fulfil everyone's wishes.

Mr Shek, a villager who attended the meeting, said the project should go ahead to ease traffic congestion. "For an elderly person who is seriously sick, a traffic jam could stop him from going to a hospital outside Sai Kung," he said.
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Old March 18th, 2009, 06:36 PM   #48
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Quote:
More than 70 people
I wonder why journalists keep using sentences like this... Were there 71 people? Or 293? Or 2788? They probably want to make it sound more than it actually is.

Anyhow, overdevelopment seems to be more an issue than the traffic problems an sich.
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Old March 27th, 2009, 07:20 PM   #49
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Aecom Technology $80 million contract for work on Hong Kong highway project
25 March 2009

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Aecom Technology Corp., a provider of technical and management-support services, on Wednesday said it received a contract worth about $80 million to provide design- and construction-management services for a major highway construction project in Hong Kong.

The deal is in addition to an existing contract worth an estimated $30 million with Hong Kong's transportation department. The new project includes a longer road and an additional deep tunnel, Aecom said.

The modified Central-Wan Chai Bypass and Island Eastern Corridor Link plan will provide a direct east-to-west highway route for traffic between Hong Kong's central business district and the eastern part of the island.

When completed, traffic will bypass existing roads along parts of the island's north shore via a 2.3-mile tunnel. The project, which is expected to cost a total of about $3 billion, is slated for completion in 2016.
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Old March 31st, 2009, 04:23 PM   #50
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T2主幹路2016年竣工
17 March 2009

【明報專訊】運輸及房屋局向立法會建議,把連接中九龍幹線及藍田—將軍澳隧道的T2主幹路工程提升為甲級工程,今年10月會展開勘察及設計,預計可於2012年展開工程,2016年與中九龍幹線及將軍澳隧道同步竣工,組成六號幹線,屆時車輛可由西九龍直達將軍澳。

擬建的T2主幹路長約3.6公里,當中約2.6公里為隧道,是一條連接中九龍幹線與藍田—將軍澳隧道的雙程雙線主幹道,工程費用為約79億元,運輸及房屋局指出,工程包括建造隧道所需的臨時填海工程和重建觀塘初級污水處理廠的海底污水排放管道。

政府建議於今年10月展開設計和勘察,並會進行環境影響評估,當局強調會提供資料及諮詢公眾,令工程符合《保護海港條例》的要求,有關勘測和設計工作可創造約67個職位,預計設計和勘察可於2012年初完成。
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Old April 15th, 2009, 12:51 PM   #51
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With giant bridge built at last, new road to airport set to open
8 April 2009
South China Morning Post

A multibillion-dollar expressway that will cut journey times between the airport and the northeastern New Territories may come into service this year, the transport minister said following the much-delayed completion yesterday of a key bridge.

The final span of the Stonecutters Bridge across the Rambler Channel separating Tsing Yi from western Kowloon was lifted into place a year later than planned. The bridge has cost HK$3.7 billion rather than the HK$2.7 billion budgeted.

Despite the delay and cost overrun, Secretary for Transport and Housing Eva Cheng said she was happy with progress on the project.

"This is the world's second longest cable-stayed bridge. It will become a landmark for Hong Kong," she said.

Chow Ying-shun, a Highways Department project manager for major works, said a mistake in surveying work and underestimation of the impact of weather on the project were the main reasons for the HK$1 billion overrun. Inflation in the prices of construction materials was another reason.

"We misjudged the nature of the rock that we built our bridge on. Ten of the piers had to go as deep as 100 metres, rather than 60 metres, and that costs a lot more," he said.

He denied there had been negligence, but said the government would see whether there were grounds for passing on some of the extra costs to contractors.

"We will pay for the jobs they did, such as the time and money involved in that additional 40 metres," he said.

"We poked more than 70 holes in the ground to test the rock, which is more than enough for a project of such scale, but after all, our findings are still only an estimation [of the actual ground conditions]."

Drivers will not pay a toll to use the bridge.

Route 8 links Sha Tin to Chek Lap Kok via Cheung Sha Wan and container terminals in Kwai Chung.

The section between Sha Tin and Cheung Sha Wan opened in March last year, cutting the journey time between Sha Tin and West Kowloon to five minutes and the journey time from the New Territories new town to the Kwai Chung terminals to 15 minutes.

When the bridge enters service, the journey time between Sha Tin and the airport will be halved, to 35 minutes.

The bridge is one of the world's highest. Its deck is 73.5 metres above the Rambler Channel - more than enough to allow for passage of the world's biggest cargo vessels and able to accommodate the even larger vessels that may be built in the future.
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Old May 5th, 2009, 07:03 PM   #52
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Old May 9th, 2009, 08:30 PM   #53
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Route 8: Traffic Control and Surveillance System
http://r8nscv.youdomain.com/tcss/eng_project.htm







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Old May 11th, 2009, 07:35 PM   #54
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Source : http://www.pbase.com/cjmichael/panoramas_world_trip

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Old May 16th, 2009, 04:14 PM   #55
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Homegrown dragon motif wins global competition to design road noise barriers
9 May 2009
South China Morning Post

Find the noise barriers facing your home unbearable or bad fung shui? The winners of a recent competition for noise screen designs show they could look quite different.

The winning team in the professional category, four fresh architecture graduates from Hong Kong, put forward a concept for a noise barrier at the Gascoigne Road bridge in Yau Ma Tei that looks like a green dragon twisting its way through the city.

Slovenian architects Bostjan Vuga, Jurij Sadar, Sven Kalim and Jose Ramon Velazquez took the second prize for their noise barrier design in the professional category, while local architects Marisa Yiu and Eric Schuldenfrei won third prize.

The flyover traverses the heart of the bustling old district from west to east, passing popular landmarks such as Temple Street and the Tin Hau Temple. The bridge will be demolished and rebuilt in the same place as part of the Central Kowloon Route, to be completed by 2016.

"Our idea originates from the banyan trees on the walls, and we hope our design can inject life into the community and interact with the environment and the people living in it," team member Archoi Choi Kit-wang said.

The other team members, all in their early 20s, were Lancelot Ng Sing-lam, Stephen Ip Hay-fung and Li Kwan Ho.

Mr Ip said the team had abandoned commonly used designs that simply imposed an additional box-like cover on roads because of their negative visual impact.

Instead they opted for an innovative scheme, enclosing the flyover in a double-layered shell of glass modules designed to maximise noise reduction. Some of the modules could become planters to support vegetation that could grow and climb along the surface of the barriers. Photovoltaic panels could also be installed to supply electricity for lighting.

Mr Ip said they believed their concept was technically feasible, though it was difficult to estimate its cost. "This might cost a bit more but we believe it is worth paying," he said.

The team, which also came up with a design for a noise barrier for Tai Po's Tai Wo Road, beat overseas teams in the competition's professional category.

Other winners of the competition, which also dealt with noise barrier designs for Tuen Mun Road, came from Japan, Slovenia, Italy and the United States. It was co-organised by the Highways Department, the Environmental Protection Department and four professional bodies.

Highways Department chief engineer Chow Chun-wah said it would try, as much as possible, to integrate the concepts of the winning entries into the design of noise barriers.

He said some of the winning ideas were technically feasible, though it might take more time to refine them for actual construction.

But he cautioned that the new concepts would not change the fact that many sections of existing roads would still be unsuitable sites for noise barriers because of weight and structural limitations.

Mr Chow said shifting public expectations of noise barriers, from acceptance of functional but dull designs to a desire to see ones with visual value, had pushed engineers to think outside the box.

"We will try to produce tailor-made designs to suit the community which do not just serve to block noise but are also welcomed by the public and perhaps have the potential to become a landmark in the district," Mr Chow said.

In 2003, the government decided to remove noise barriers along the Tolo Highway after complaints from drivers and nearby residents who criticised them for blocking views.
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Old May 16th, 2009, 05:47 PM   #56
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Old May 19th, 2009, 03:33 PM   #57
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Staff integrity matters to highways chiefs
19 May 2009
South China Morning Post

We refer to the article by Christine Loh Kung-wai ("Highways to hell", April 30).

Through its well-established capital works programme, the government ensures effective use of public funds for timely implementation of public infrastructure projects.

We scrutinise their need and benefits and prioritise funding allocations and programmes. We consult the public and stakeholders and incorporate their suggestions for the projects where practicable. Through statutory procedures, we firm up project plans before seeking funding approval from the Legislative Council.

The Highways Department has adhered to this practice with the Stonecutters Bridge which Ms Loh mentioned. It forms part of Route 8 providing a strategic link between Northeast New Territories and Lantau with convenient connections to the Kwai Chung container terminal. The route will link up the terminals with major expressways and relieve anticipated traffic congestion on Kwai Tsing Highway, Tsing Yi Road and the roads in the container port areas. Route 8 will bring greater travelling convenience to the general public, and the Stonecutters Bridge, in particular, will play a key role in supporting Hong Kong's port and logistics industry.

Likewise, the Central-Wan Chai bypass project aims to relieve traffic congestion already experienced in Central and Wan Chai. The expert panel for sustainable transport planning and Central-Wan Chai bypass has confirmed its urgent need. The public strongly supports its early implementation. We are also mindful of its interface with the Sha Tin to Central link. The department and the MTR Corporation remain in close touch on both projects aiming for minimal reclamation and disruption to Causeway Bay typhoon shelter users.

Infrastructure works are mostly implemented through contracts tendered. For Highways Department maintenance contracts, legal advisers vet the tender documents before tendering. Tender assessment and selection are scrutinised and approved by the Central Tender Board. After award of contracts we conduct regular road inspections to develop maintenance schedules. Works instructions issued to and executed by the contractors require full justification and records. There are also independent audits by separate teams. Contractors and staff are accountable for their non-compliance.

The department attaches great importance to staff quality and integrity. Its integrity management committee implements integrity management plans, providing regular staff training on misconduct prevention and ethical standard enhancement. Last year, we held six workshops and two thematic talks with the Independent Commission Against Corruption's assistance. The department and the ICAC meet regularly to identify study areas on anti-corruption. We will continue to work with the ICAC on improvement of existing procedures.

The department is very serious about the ICAC investigation mentioned by Ms Lo. We have co-operated fully with the ICAC and will not tolerate any misconduct by our staff. Any staff member who is convicted of such offences will be subject to disciplinary proceedings.

Wai Chi-sing, Director of Highways
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Old May 22nd, 2009, 08:17 AM   #58
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Highways Department Standard Drawings


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Old May 23rd, 2009, 08:58 AM   #59
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HK$28b bypass gets the green light
Work on Central-Wan Chai link to start by end of year; activists may go to courts again

21 May 2009
South China Morning Post

Construction of the long-planned Central-Wan Chai bypass will start by the end of the year, the government announced yesterday.

It said the HK$28 billion project, after clearing all its legal obstacles, was approved by the Executive Council on Tuesday and would be submitted to the Legislative Council, to seek funding.

But the Society for the Protection of the Harbour, which has mounted a series of legal challenges to the project, warned it would not rule out further legal action unless the government explained clearly why the project was not being co-ordinated with the Sha Tin-to-Central rail link, part of which would follow a similar route.

The 4.5km bypass, along the northern shore of Hong Kong Island, consisting mainly of a six-lane tunnel, will involve permanent reclamation of 12.7 hectares of the harbour and temporary reclamation of the Causeway Bay typhoon shelter.

The route will go underground at the Rumsey Street flyover near the Two IFC tower, pass Admiralty and the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, emerge near the typhoon shelter and connect to the Island Eastern Corridor.

"There is a compelling need for the bypass to ease the serious traffic congestion along Connaught Road Central, Harcourt Road and Gloucester Road," a government spokesman said, adding that a journey from Central to Causeway Bay took at least 15 minutes, and much more during peak hours "If nothing is done, by 2017 the route will take 45 minutes."

A byproduct of the bypass will be a HK$4.6 billion package of developments in northern Wan Chai and North Point on the reclaimed land after construction is completed.

Most of the land along the waterfront would be developed into a public promenade, the spokesman said, and would join the new Central harbourfront, now under construction.

To improve pedestrian links between the adjoining land and the waterfront, five footpaths, a footbridge and three landscaped decks would be built in Wan Chai and North Point.

The bypass project was halted last year after a court ruled, in a judicial review sought by the Society for the Protection of the Harbour, that the government had failed to establish "an overriding public need" for the temporary reclamation work at the Causeway Bay typhoon shelter. The government was then forced to scale down the reclamation size and conduct an extensive public consultation to establish such a need.

The amended scope of reclamation was the smallest possible, Secretary for Development Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor said, adding: "I hope the project can commence as all disputes are now coming to an end." But the harbour society's adviser, Winston Chu Ka-sun, said the dispute was not over yet. He said the Sha Tin-to-Central link, now being planned, should share the same tube as the road to avoid further reclamation, and the government owed the public and lawmakers an explanation on why this would not happen. "Litigation is the last thing I want to do, but if there is no other way, I will do that," he said.

The government spokesman said the rail project was still subject to public consultation and objections, while the bypass could not wait. "If the railway requires any reclamation in future, it will have to justify the need," he said, adding that the government had been co-ordinating with the MTR Corp on the design.

Democratic Party lawmaker Lee Wing-tat said he basically supported the project but in seeking funding approval the government should communicate with concern groups.

The Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong and the Liberal Party also supported the project.
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Old May 23rd, 2009, 06:09 PM   #60
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New route 10 years in the planning
21 May 2009
South China Morning Post

1999 Government proposes building bypass to ease traffic congestion

2002 Administration gazettes plan for bypass with Wan Chai North outline zoning plan for public consultation. Plan involves reclamation of 26 hectares in Wan Chai North

2003 Harbour protection society seeks judicial review against decisions of Town Planning Board, which approved bypass plan

2004 Court of Final Appeal rules that harbour reclamation must satisfy overriding public need test. Government sets up Harbourfront Enhancement Committee to oversee all works projects along waterfront

2007 Government, with help of expert panel, says there is not a feasible "no reclamation" option for building bypass, while working to reduce scope of reclamation

2008 Court of First Instance rules on judicial review, sought again by harbour protection society, that government has failed to prove that temporary reclamation for bypass project has overriding public need. Administration forced to further reduce temporary reclamation size at Causeway Bay typhoon shelter from 10.7 hectares to 8.3 hectares. Permanent reclamation cut to 12.7 hectares from 26.

Yesterday Government says work to start by end of year
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