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Old November 29th, 2011, 11:56 AM   #121
hkskyline
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Government Press Release
Wednesday, November 23, 2011
LCQ2: Commissioning of Tuen Mun-Chek Lap Kok Link and Tuen Mun Western Bypass and Tuen Mun Road Improvement Project

Following is a question by the Hon Cheung Hok-ming and a reply by the Acting Secretary for Transport and Housing, Mr Yau Shing-mu, at the Legislative Council meeting today (November 23):

Question:

The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge ("HZMB") infrastructure projects in Hong Kong will commence soon, and the bridge is expected to be commissioned in 2016, but the commissioning of the northern connection of the Tuen Mun-Chek Lap Kok Link ("TM-CLKL") (i.e. the section connecting the Hong Kong Boundary Crossing Facilities to Tuen Mun), which was originally scheduled for 2016, will be deferred by one year to 2017 because of the impact of the judicial review regarding the Environmental Impact Assessment reports of the HZMB. On the other hand, the Tuen Mun Western Bypass ("TMWB") is still at the preliminary design stage, and its commissioning will also be delayed. Regarding the problems caused to the traffic of the Northwest New Territories because the completion of the three related projects cannot dovetail with one another, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) whether the authorities have conducted any traffic flow survey to assess the impact on the traffic load in Northwest New Territories due to the one-year delay in the commissioning of the northern connection of the TM-CLKL and the delayed commissioning of the TMWB; if they have, of the relevant figures; if not, the reasons for that;

(b) of the detailed progress of the Tuen Mun Road Improvement Project, and whether it will be completed in time to help ease the traffic congestion in Northwest New Territories brought about by the delay of the two aforesaid infrastructure projects; and

(c) of the increase in the design traffic capacity of Tuen Mun Road after completion of its various improvement works, and whether it is sufficient to cope with the traffic flow generated by the commissioning of the HZMB which is earlier than that of the two aforesaid infrastructure projects?

Reply:

President:

The Tuen Mun-Chek Lap Kok Link (TM-CLKL) is a strategic route connecting North Lantau, the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge (HZMB) Hong Kong Boundary Crossing Facilities (HKBCF) and Tuen Mun, further linking up North-west New Territories (NWNT) through the Tuen Mun Western Bypass (TMWB) under planning, to cope with future development.

Upon completion, the most important benefits that the TM-CLKL and TMWB will bring about are: firstly, the travel distance and journey time between NWNT and North Lantau will be significantly shortened and some traffic capacities of the existing routes (such as the Lantau Link and Tuen Mun Road) will be released. As a result, the traffic flow to urban areas will be relieved; secondly, the TM-CLKL will provide an alternative access connecting the Hong Kong International Airport in addition to the existing North Lantau Highway. This helps to strengthen the traffic network of the Airport and reinforce the Airport as an international and regional aviation hub; thirdly, the two projects can help improve cross-border traffic. The TM-CLKL project connects with Shenzhen via the TMWB, Kong Sham Western Highway and Shenzhen Bay Bridge in the north; and connects with the HZMB HKBCF and the North Lantau Highway in the south. This road network is important to the promotion of closer economic integration between Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta region.

Regarding the three parts of the question, the reply is as follows:

(a) Regarding the judicial review (JR) case of the HZMB, although the applicant has excluded the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Report of the TM-CLKL in the application of the JR, the construction programme of the TM-CLKL has been delayed by about one year due to the JR. This is because the southern landfall of the TM-CLKL sub-sea tunnel and the reclamation of the HZMB HKBCF are taken forward under the same contract in the same location at the same time.

Our original plan was to open the TM-CLKL and the HZMB at the same time, but now we will implement these two projects by phases. As the 3-km viaduct, connecting the HZMB HKBCF and North Lantau Highway, of the TM-CLKL has to be commissioned at the same time as the HZMB, so as to provide access for vehicles entering and leaving the HKBCF, we will open this section of the TM-CLKL by 2016 through works arrangements. As regards the northern section of the TM-CLKL (i.e. the sub-sea tunnel connecting the HZMB HKBCF and Tuen Mun), as it is not related to the opening of the HZMB, works will be completed in 2017.

Regarding the TMWB, we have conducted extensive public consultation on various alignment options. After in-depth discussion with the stakeholders, we have selected the current proposal among the ten options. The environmental and traffic impact assessments are underway. The work has been delayed due to uncertainties caused by the "baseline assessment" requirement that was suggested in the HZMB JR case. After the allowance of the appeal lodged by the Government, we are working to commission the TMWB in roughly the same time frame as the northern section of the TM-CLKL.

According to traffic impact assessment carried out by the consultants engaged by the Highways Department, the main traffic network to NWNT via North Lantau Highway will become busier in 2016 (the early years after the opening of the HZMB), but there should be no congestion.

The vehicle/capacity (v/c) ratio is the professional indicator to measure traffic congestion. Generally speaking, a v/c ratio of 1.2 or smaller indicates that the situation of the concerned roads during peak hours is still acceptable. If the v/c ratio is above 1.25, it indicates that there will be traffic congestion. According to the data obtained from traffic impact assessment, under the scenario without the northern section of the TM-CLKL in 2017, the v/c ratio of the Tuen Mun Road (Sham Tseng section) will increase to 1.25 in 2017, indicating traffic congestion during peak hours. However, if the northern section of the TM-CLKL can be commissioned in 2017, the ratio is expected to drop to 1.18, indicating that congestion will not appear. This can timely avoid traffic congestion that may appear on Tuen Mun Road (Sham Tseng section) during peak hours.

The consultants have also carried out a similar traffic impact assessment for the TMWB. In the absence of the TMWB, the v/c ratio of the slip roads connecting Tuen Mun Road (Town Centre section) and Wong Chu Road will increase to 1.28 in 2019, indicating that congestion would appear during peak hours. If the TMWB is commissioned, the v/c ratio of Wong Chu Road will gradually decrease to about 0.7, indicating that congestion would not appear even during peak hours. It also helps relieve the traffic burden in other areas in Tuen Mun.

Therefore, we aim to complete the northern section of TM-CLKL in 2017 as planned and endeavour to commission the TMWB and the northern section of the TM-CLKL in roughly the same time frame.

(b) and (c) The Tuen Mun Road improvement project is underway. It includes two main parts, namely the reconstruction and improvement of Tuen Mun Road (between Tsuen Wan and Sam Shing Hui), and widening of Tuen Mun Road (Town Centre section).

The first part of the works is mainly to reconstruct the Tuen Mun Road to meet the current expressway standard and to add hard shoulders. The proposed hard shoulders can provide additional road surface to allow the concerned officers to arrive the locations to handle the traffic incidents more quickly. They also enable temporary traffic arrangement to minimise traffic congestion caused by traffic incidents.

The second part of the works is the widening of the Town Centre section from a dual two-lane carriageway to a dual three-lane carriageway. After the completion of the works, the designed capacity of the concerned section of Tuen Mun Road would be increased by 54% from 3,700 passenger car unit (pcu) per hour to 5,700 pcu per hour.

The Tuen Mun Road improvement project commenced in mid 2008, and was implemented through six works contracts by phases.

The first contract is for widening of the road section near Tsing Tin Interchange from a dual two-lane carriageway to a dual three-lane carriageway. The construction commenced in June 2008 and completed in January 2010. Four other contracts commenced between October 2008 and February 2010 by phases, including works for widening the approximately 1.5 km long of Tuen Mun Road (Town Centre section) from a dual two-lane carriageway to a dual three-lane carriageway, reconstruction of 15.5 km of Tuen Mun Road between Tsuen Wan and Sam Shing Hui, and hard shoulders construction. The construction works are progressing satisfactorily and are tentatively targeted for completion in end 2014.

Tender for the remaining contract, covering the construction of traffic control and surveillance system, was invited in October this year. It is anticipated that tender assessment will be completed early next year. The works are expected to commence in April 2012 for completion in end 2014.

In conclusion, the various improvement works of the Tuen Mun Road will be completed in 2014 to meet the traffic demand for a number of years in future, including traffic to be brought about by the HZMB after its early years of opening in 2016. It is anticipated that traffic congestion will not appear at such time.
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Old December 12th, 2011, 06:17 PM   #122
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Source : http://johnblog.phychembio.com/?p=3934







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Old July 13th, 2012, 06:07 PM   #123
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Old July 14th, 2012, 06:40 AM   #124
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Tenders invited for contract for "Widening of Fanling Highway - Tai Hang to Wo Hop Shek Interchange"
Friday, July 13, 2012
Government Press Release

The Highways Department today (July 13) invited tenders for the contract for "Widening of Fanling Highway - Tai Hang to Wo Hop Shek Interchange" (Contract No.: HY/2012/06).

The works are expected to commence in February 2013 and will take about 64 months to complete. The works will mainly comprise:

* widening of the section about 2 km long of Fanling Highway between Tai Hang and Wo Hop Shek Interchange (excluding the section between Nam Wa Po and Kiu Tau) from a dual three-lane carriageway to a dual four-lane carriageway, with standard hard shoulders on both directions of the carriageway;

* widening of a slip road of about 250 metres connecting Jockey Club Road to Fanling Highway southbound at Wo Hop Shek;

* re-alignment of a section of Tai Wo Service Road West about 1.2km long between Tai Hang and Nam Wa Po;

* construction of a vehicular bridge (with walkway) at Kau Lung Hang; demolition of four existing footbridges and construction of four footbridges at Tai Hang, Tai Wo, Ho Ka Yuen and Wo Hop Shek respectively and demolition of one existing footbridge at Nam Wa Po; and

* construction of associated noise barriers, at-grade carriageways, access tracks, footpaths and cycle tracks; associated slopeworks, road lighting, traffic aids, drainage, water mains, landscaping and electrical and mechanical works.

Tender submissions should be placed in the Government Secretariat Tender Box located on the Ground Floor, East Wing, Central Government Offices, 2 Tim Mei Avenue, Tamar, Hong Kong. Submission of tenders will close at noon on August 24, 2012 (Friday).

The Major Works Project Management Office of the Highways Department has appointed Hyder-Arup-Black and Veatch Joint Venture to design and supervise the construction works. Interested contractors can obtain the tender forms and other particulars from the office of the Hyder-Arup-Black and Veatch Joint Venture at Hyder Consulting Limited, 47/F, Hopewell Centre, 183 Queen's Road East, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.
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Old July 19th, 2012, 08:25 PM   #125
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image hosted on flickr

Route in Kwai Chung by 270 Studio, on Flickr
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Old July 19th, 2012, 10:10 PM   #126
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Where is this interchange? (link in Google Maps)
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Old July 19th, 2012, 10:22 PM   #127
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Routes 3 & 5:

https://maps.google.com/?ll=22.34904...26157&t=h&z=16
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Old July 19th, 2012, 10:40 PM   #128
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That's five minutes away before you hit the main skyline.
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Old July 19th, 2012, 11:02 PM   #129
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Oops, I knew I'd driven there.
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Old July 20th, 2012, 10:44 AM   #130
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Hong Kong Highway

highway in Hong Kong
[IMG]http://t1.************/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQb4_G4qPFqEpYktU_2acTuiUmji3QdHPDrSTl9glcy3t7AKLdj[/IMG]
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Old December 6th, 2012, 05:14 AM   #131
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Central Kowloon Route - Phase 2 Public Engagement exercise commences
Wednesday, December 5, 2012
Government Press Release



The Highways Department commenced the three-month Phase 2 Public Engagement exercise for the Central Kowloon Route (CKR) today (December 5) to collect public views on the detailed design and construction arrangements of the CKR.

The CKR is a 4.7-kilometre dual three-lane trunk road with 3.9km of tunnel and will form a key component of the strategic road network in Hong Kong after commissioning.

The Project Manager of the Major Works Project Management Office of the Highways Department, Mrs Joanna Kwok, indicated at the media briefing today that the CKR would connect the Yau Ma Tei Interchange in West Kowloon with Kowloon Bay and Kai Tak Development in East Kowloon and hence divert traffic away from the major east-west corridors in Kowloon. This would therefore effectively relieve the existing congestion problems and cater for traffic demand generated by future developments. Furthermore, the CKR consists mainly of tunnels and will thus help reduce air pollution resulting from traffic congestion.

"With the commissioning of the CKR, the journey time between Kowloon Bay and Yau Ma Tei through CKR at peak hours will be only around five minutes, thus saving about 25 to 30 minutes in comparison with the travel time without the CKR," Mrs Kwok said.

The department conducted the Phase 1 Public Engagement exercise for the CKR between 2007 and 2009. According to feedback collected at that time, the public generally agreed with the need for construction of the CKR and supported the recommended alignment as well as the reprovisioning arrangements for the affected public facilities.

"The design of the CKR incorporated several features in response to the public concerns raised in the Phase 1 Public Engagement exercise. On environment, we will construct landscape decks and noise enclosures and barriers at appropriate locations to enhance the environmental benefits of the project and at the same time introduce more greening and improve the adjacent environment. On culture and heritage, the recommended alignment will preserve the historic buildings of the Yau Ma Tei Police Station and allow Temple Street night market activities to continue during the construction stage," Mrs Kwok added.

"We will adopt the approach of reproviding the affected public facilities in advance to minimise the impact on public services. The extent of the temporary reclamation for construction of the underwater tunnel in Kowloon Bay will be kept to the minimum.

"Furthermore, the tunnel will be constructed mainly deep underground in rock stratum and will not therefore affect the foundation, structure and use of the adjacent buildings. The recommended alignment will not involve any resumption and clearance of private properties or relocation of any households," she said.

The department is progressively issuing the latest project news and invitations to adjacent residents to participate in the focus group meetings to be held from December 12 to 20 to introduce the CKR project. Other public engagement activities including public forums and roving exhibitions will also be organised to help the public understand and engage in wider discussions on the project.

The department will complete the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) report in parallel with the public engagement and will apply to the Director of Environmental Protection for the approval of the EIA report and issue of the Environmental Permit in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Impact Assessment Ordinance. The CKR project will also be gazetted in accordance with the Roads (Works, Use and Compensation) Ordinance in due course. It is anticipated that the works will start in around 2015 and will be completed in about five years.

The revamped CKR website (www.ckr-hyd.hk) was launched today to disseminate information on the project and latest news on the public engagement activities. Visits by the public are welcomed. For enquiries, please contact us via the department hotline (Tel: 2762 3601).
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Old January 13th, 2013, 02:13 PM   #132
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Causeway Bay Island Eastern Corridor, Hong Kong by wing1O1, on Flickr
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Old January 14th, 2013, 07:02 AM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
Oops, I knew I'd driven there.
^
Hehe not that I want to be assertive or anything but..........is there really an 'absolutely need' to drive or rent-a-car in Hong Kong?

Perhaps if you're traveling mostly to New Territories or areas outside the MTR train service........or if you just feel like driving for the heck of it.

But imo, I don't think there's really an imminent need to drive or rent-a-car when in Hong Kong.

If you ask me, I'll only rent-a-car if my hotel is in a far-flung area like Cyberport or Sai Kung or To Kwa Wan. Anywhere else, I would just prefer to take public transportation (MTR Trains more specifically).

Just my two cents =)
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Old January 14th, 2013, 02:00 PM   #134
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I took a taxi cab, I didn't drive myself. I don't know about trains, but driving from the airport to the Hong Kong Island was very interesting.
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Old January 15th, 2013, 08:52 PM   #135
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Quote:
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I took a taxi cab, I didn't drive myself. I don't know about trains, but driving from the airport to the Hong Kong Island was very interesting.
Ah I see.

Anyways, the drive can also be interesting. I remembered during our last trip (December 2011), we used the N11 overnight airport bus service (from Sheung Wan Ferry Terminal to the HK Airport) and it was quite smooth.

It uses Route 8 (which includes the Kap Shui Mun bridge) so it's very scenic =)
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Old September 29th, 2014, 11:31 PM   #136
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Time lapse video I found on YouTube. I wonder how long it will take before the British style lay-out and road signs are dissapearing...

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Old September 30th, 2014, 11:20 PM   #137
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No reason to think they would disappear is there? I actually like the look of Hong Kong - it is very much an east meets west look. It's so strange every time I am there - some things are so familiar as they remind me of the UK, yet then you see bamboo scaffolding and all the signs everywhere. That soon brings you back to earth.
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Old September 30th, 2014, 11:27 PM   #138
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I have never been to Hong Kong, but whenever I am in Gibraltar (British system, but drive on right) or Northern Ireland or even Jersey, everything on the roads look British - like road markings, traffic lights, signs... But it all still has its own identity.

Who brings in those standards, and who makes sure it stays maintained? It must be still someone from mainland UK overlooking the Hong Kong situation, because it stopped being British in 1992, but I am sure they're still building new roads with UK markings, roads signs etc and they even still issue UK style number plates.
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Old October 1st, 2014, 12:08 AM   #139
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Quote:
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It must be still someone from mainland UK overlooking the Hong Kong situation, because it stopped being British in 1992
1997
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Old October 1st, 2014, 12:17 AM   #140
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Sorry, yes you're right. Still... nearly 18 years ago
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