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Old October 1st, 2007, 03:45 AM   #21
urbane
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Thanks. I do, but I am moving back home in January. I took the photos during my vacation back home this summer.
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Old October 1st, 2007, 03:47 AM   #22
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Now to the Borgo Teresiano: the Theresian quarter which was built under the reign of empress Maria Theresa. This neighborhood was planned in a grid on the site of the former salt-works to accommodate the City’s expansion (which until then had been largely confined to San Giusto Hill and the area of present-day Piazza Unità e Piazza della Borsa). The original plans for the area included multiple canals but ultimately only one was created.

Here is a historic view of the area when it was still occupied by the Salt Works:



The buildings facing the waterfront are in the Borgo Teresiano. They are, from left to right: Palazzo Aedes , Palazzo Carciotti (by architect Pertsch, 1802), the former Hotel de la Ville (by architect DeGasperi, 1839), and the Greek-Orthodox church of San Nicola (façade by architect Pertsch, 1787):



An image of the interior of the Greek-Orthodox church that I found on the net:



Now some photos of the individual buildings located along the Borgo Teresiano’s waterfront from upclose. Palazzo Aedes (also called Grattacielo rosso, or red skyscraper, despite its lack of height) by architect Arduino Berlam, built in 1928:



Palazzo Carciotti, by architect Matteo Pertsch, built in 1802 for a Greek merchant family:



Palazzo Assicurazioni Generali, built by the architects Geiringer and Zabeo in 1886 is the headquarters of the Generali insurance company which has operations worldwide:



On the opposite side of the street from the Palazzo Aedes one finds the Casa del Lavoratore Portuale (Hose of the Dock Woker), built in 1931 by architect Pollack:



A view down Corso Cavour, which separates the Borgo Teresiano from the harbor:



The central element of the Borgo Teresiano is the Canal Grande, built in the 1700s to enable sail ships to dock in the heart of the city:





The canal by night:



The canal is flanked by some interesting structures and open spaces. Palazzo Gopcevich:





Piazza Ponterosso (red bridge square), named after a bridge crossing the canal, is the site of an open-air market where fruits, vegetables, as well as all sorts of fake clothing are sold:





A view of Via Roma (connecting Piazza Ponterosso and Piazza della Borsa):



The Banca Nazionale del Lavoro



Taking a look at Via Cassa del Risparmio, between Palazzo Carciotti and Banca Nazionale del Lavoro:



The Serbian-Orthodox church of Ss. Trinità e S. Spiridione, unfortunately covered for renovation work, is my favorite church in town. It was built between 1861 and 1869 by Milanese architect Carlo Maciachini with a bizantine style. Previously the Serbian-Orthodox and Greek-Orthodox shared the same church, then the two religious communities split and the Greek-Orthodox community moved to the waterfront.



Here’s how it looks like from outside (image from the net):

image hosted on flickr



The neoclassical Sant’Antonio Nuovo church was designed by architect Pietro Nobile and inspired by Rome’s Pantheon. It was completed in 1842 and is located at the end of the canal. Originally the canal was slightly longer and arrived almost at the steps of the church, however, during the Fascist period, the portion of the canal between Via Dante Alighieri and Via San Spiridione was landfilled:



A building next to Sant’Antonio Nuovo:



The rear of Sant’Antonio Nuovo from Piazza San Giovanni:



Statue of composer Giuseppe Verdi in the piazza (the statue was in stone until the Austrian destroyed it in 1915, after WWI it was rebuilt in metal):



Sponges behind a storefront:



Clock at the corner of Via delle Torri and Via San Lazzaro:



More pics from the Borgo Teresiano. Via San Nicoló:





Corner of Via S. Nicoló and Via Roma:



The former R.A.S. (Riunone Adriatica di Securtà) in Via Mazzini:



A very decorated building on the corner of Via Dante Alighieri and Via S. Nicoló:



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Old October 1st, 2007, 09:38 PM   #23
delfino
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Trieste have a beautiful city centre, I love it I was many times in this city bellisime foto,grazie Urbane
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Old October 20th, 2007, 08:34 PM   #24
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Hvala !
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Old October 20th, 2007, 08:40 PM   #25
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Piazza Goldoni: certainly not the prettiest townsquare in the city, in part due to all the bus and car traffic that goes through it. However, it underwent restyling recently which has sensibly improved it. Here it is:











Looking towards Via Ginnastica:



The façade of a building in Via Carducci, near Piazza Goldoni:



Viale XX Settembre: a pedestrian street lined with shops, cafes, and gelaterie







New fountain at the southern end of the viale:



Via Giusto Muratti:

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Old October 20th, 2007, 10:19 PM   #26
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Wonderful city!!
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Old October 20th, 2007, 10:30 PM   #27
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Very beautiful city. I love the look of Italian cities and also love the way they hang street lights from wires to the middle of the street. I noticed that in Milan, Roma and Catania.
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Old October 21st, 2007, 12:30 AM   #28
kingsdl76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbane View Post
Thank you for all your comments. I'm glad you appreciate the city and the photos.
Hey.....I used to live about an hour west of Trieste, in Aviano, just north of Pordenone. I have a lot of great memories from my time there. I really love that country. I lived there in the 80's and everytime I hear songs from that era, I think of Italy. Anyway, my family and I visited Trieste a number of times. Every summer we would pass that general area on the way to Yugoslavia. We used to stay a week in Lake Bled. That place was great too. I plan to go to Italy and Israel next summer....I cant wait to get back there!!
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Old December 17th, 2007, 05:40 AM   #29
urbane
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
Very beautiful city. I love the look of Italian cities and also love the way they hang street lights from wires to the middle of the street. I noticed that in Milan, Roma and Catania.
Yes they are common. They make a lot of sense on narrow roads with structures built-to-line and narrow sidewalks.
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Old December 17th, 2007, 05:47 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsdl76 View Post
Hey.....I used to live about an hour west of Trieste, in Aviano, just north of Pordenone. I have a lot of great memories from my time there. I really love that country. I lived there in the 80's and everytime I hear songs from that era, I think of Italy. Anyway, my family and I visited Trieste a number of times. Every summer we would pass that general area on the way to Yugoslavia. We used to stay a week in Lake Bled. That place was great too. I plan to go to Italy and Israel next summer....I cant wait to get back there!!
I agree, the Alpe-Adria region (IT-SLO-CRO) has, a lot to offer in terms of beauty.
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Old December 18th, 2007, 05:21 AM   #31
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It’s been a while since I posted on this thread: so far I’ve covered mainly the part of the City-center that grew dramatically during the XVIII, XIX and early XX century under Austrian rule when Trieste became one of the empire’s main ports. The next photos shift the focus to the older area of San Giusto Hill: where the city was born as a Roman settlement, and where most of the development took place until the expansion that started in the XVIII century.

Let’s start with some maps. Here is one of the original Roman settlement (founded around 170 BC). The settlement was rather small and included only one side of the hill. The coastline at the time extended until approximately just south of the ruins of the Roman theater. Therefore the current area of Piazza Unità was underwater.



This curious old map shows plans to expand the City walls that protected Trieste during the Middle Ages to San Vito Hill. These plans never materialized and the city remained constrained to the area you see at the bottom:



Let’s start the journey with the ruins of the Roman Theater, built in the I century AD (nowadays basically unused and the home of many cats):





Now to the Church of Santa Maria Maggiore (the large one) and San Silvestro (the smaller one). Santa Maria Maggiore was built by the Jeusit Order in 1632, while the façade is more recent. San Silvestro is one of the oldest churches in Trieste, and is currently used by the Waldesian community.





The rear of San Silvestro:



The Arco di Riccardo used to be one of the gates of the Roman walls built during Emperor Ottaviano’s reign:



Some buildings in the Cittavecchia are in bad shape like this one:



But in the last years, many more are getting fixed-up and have gotten a new coat of paint like these ones in Piazzetta San Silvestro and the whole area may even become trendy in the future:







The Cittavecchia has lots of narrow roads and corners thus offers many interesting views:







Walking up towards the top of the hill, I took a few shots of San Vito hill, a more residential area with more recent buildings:





Walking up the hill, San Giusto cathedral becomes visible on the top (unfortunately I didn’t go inside to take photos since a Mass was being held):



The medieval cathedral has a beautiful rose-window of the 14th century:



The façade and tower contain several Roman elements, some belonging to a pre-existing Roman building: the main entranceway-jambs are of a Roman tombstone, the left entrance belonged to the Roman propylaeum etc. The façade also includes the busts of three bishops of Trieste (one of them became Pope Pius II).





The statue of San Giusto, Saint patron of Trieste:



The small church of San Michele al Carnale, located right next to the cathedral:



Two symbols of Trieste on top of this column from 1844: the melón (mellon), and the alabarda. The symbol of the melón used to be on top of the cathedral’s bell-tower until lighting struck it in 1421 and it was never replaced.



The Melón with the cathedral bell-tower and St. John’s baptistry in the background:



Someone’s views over the harbor:





The top of San Giusto hill also hosts a castle built over 30 some years: started by the Venetians and completed by the Austrians. It was built exclusively for defensive purposes, and today hosts some exhibitions:







The entrance to the castle:



A peak towards the gulf through the trees:



The rear of the cathedral and the castle walls:



The remains of the Roman era forum basilica: once a two-story structure:







Next to the Roman remains is a monument to the fallen of World War I:







Views of the city and the gulf from San Giusto hill:













The other side of the hill offers some views of Trieste’s inland periphery:





More pics of Cittavecchia and of other parts of Trieste will come soon.
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Old December 18th, 2007, 03:49 PM   #32
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Great photos, Trieste is a very underated city, I've been a few times and it deserves more recognition

Do you have any pictures of that strange looking modernist church n the hillside just outside the city? It looks like it should be in 'Planet of the APes' or something like that
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Old January 4th, 2008, 07:33 PM   #33
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That's Monte Grisa: it's quite brutalist in terms of architecture. I don't have an upclose shot of it.
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Old January 4th, 2008, 07:38 PM   #34
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Now to other pics of Cittàvecchia.

Photographs taken from the Parco della Rimembranza (right next to San Giusto castle) overlooking Piazza Goldoni and Viale Carducci:





Descending from the top of San Giusto Hill:



I couldn’t resist taking more photos of the city and the sea :









More shots of Cittàvecchia:







The narrow street and windy streets of Cittàvecchia are what makes it the most charming area of Trieste to me:









Tor Cucherna, was one of the defensive towers along the old city walls:



Via Donota:



The remains of Tor Donota, another tower of the old city walls:





Now to the low-lying areas of the old city: the former Jewish Ghetto and the area of Piazza Cavana. Both areas were disconnected from the higher areas of Cittàvecchia during an urban renewal plan implemented during the fascist dictatorship

Here is a photo of the original plan



Not all of it was realized, since the part of Cittàvecchia near Piazza della Borsa was not razed. Here it is:











Now to the the other low-lying area of Cittàvecchia, around Piazza Cavana and east of Piazza Unitá. Starting with a building where Napoleon stayed:





The central public space of the area is Piazza Cavana:



Looking from Piazza Cavana towards City Hall:



Via del Pesce (Fish Street )



The writer James Joyce lived in Trieste, and he has even has a statue in the area:



Via Felice Venezian:





More narrow streets:





More winding streets :







The area is becoming artsy, as witnessed by this building:





Tunnel:



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Old January 12th, 2008, 08:30 AM   #35
fabionomoto
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Wow

Your city is very beatiful!
That architecture is amazing and so rich, I love that details on the wall of the construction.

Thanks for sharing these pic with us
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Old January 12th, 2008, 08:52 AM   #36
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Stunning.
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The beating of a million drums... The fire of a million guns... The mother of a million sons... CIVILIZATION.
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Old February 10th, 2008, 04:31 AM   #37
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Great City, I´m from Puebla, Mexico, i glad to see this Pics. I want to know if some can help me to found some people in Trieste.

Best Regards.
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Old February 13th, 2008, 01:51 PM   #38
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Yeah -Trieste is absolutely amazing city. I was there last summer and hopefully, I'll go there on July
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Old February 13th, 2008, 04:47 PM   #39
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I am an admirer of port cities, places with a rich maritime tradition, places with an outstanding architectural heritage (in particular neoclassicism), and I am absolutely spell-bound by shipyards. Fincantieri shipyards are world leaders and are based in Trieste. http://www.fincantieri.it/

IMHO Trieste has it all plus more, such as world class educational and cultural institutions.

Quite simply...

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Old February 13th, 2008, 06:13 PM   #40
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Wonderful photos of your hometown, urbane, but this should be in the new Urban Showcase for our own original photographs!
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