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Old June 14th, 2014, 09:32 PM   #2001
ChrisZwolle
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What do these yellow destinations mean? Are they like local destinations in rural areas?

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Old June 14th, 2014, 10:21 PM   #2002
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Yellow destinations mean they are reached by private roads. Many of them are managed by private road associations, especially if there are several properties along the road. Also, many get extra maintenance funds from the government. If they do, they must be open for everyone.
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Old June 14th, 2014, 10:32 PM   #2003
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Aha! I really had no idea about that. They are all over the place (often unpaved).
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Old June 14th, 2014, 10:46 PM   #2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adde View Post
Here's the latest video about the Norra Länken road project in Stockholm. The project is both under budget and ahead of schedule. The first parts will be opened on November 30, 2014.

The video is in English.

I wonder if the artwork isn't a bit over the top and distracting for drivers.

By the way, I learn a lot of Swedish through these videos, they are in Swedish with English subtitles.
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Old June 14th, 2014, 11:18 PM   #2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Aha! I really had no idea about that. They are all over the place (often unpaved).
Fun fact: The colour scheme for "enskild väg" goes back all the way to 1937, and has been kept to this day while the general design follow modern norms.

Example of a really old sign:
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Old June 14th, 2014, 11:57 PM   #2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I wonder if the artwork isn't a bit over the top and distracting for drivers.
The idea is to visually make it easier for drivers to orient themselves in the tunnels, and to recognize "their" exit.

And I think there's a tradition of giving artists a pretty free reign in these kinds of infrastructure projects. Just look at the Stockholm subway.
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Old June 15th, 2014, 02:42 AM   #2007
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E4 between Söderhamn and Hudiksvall:


Mellan Söderhamn o Hudiksvall par greinsmark, sur Flickr
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Old June 15th, 2014, 03:26 AM   #2008
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Some tips for our guests:

Smygehuk - the southernmost point of Sweden (Skåne County):


Smygehuk par greinsmark, sur Flickr

Treriksröset - the northenmost point of Sweden and the joint border of three Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway and Finland). The view seen from Finland:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/jrimpi...n/photostream/
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Old June 15th, 2014, 12:37 PM   #2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dj4life View Post
Some tips for our guests:

Smygehuk - the southernmost point of Sweden (Skåne County):
Been in the area a few times. First thing I noticed when I got there was the incredible heat that hits you when you get out of your vehicle
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Old June 15th, 2014, 03:35 PM   #2010
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Quote:
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Also has to do with that trucks can do 90 km/h in Sweden while I think 80 km/h is the common speed on the continent.
According to Swedish Wikipedia, the truck speed limit is 80 km/h in Sweden, but the speed limiter is set at 90 km/h. Perhaps this makes 90 km/h the de-facto speed limit for trucks in Sweden?

90 km/h is also common as a maximum speed limit for trucks in some other European countries, but it varies, 80 and 90 are most common. Technically the UK allows 96 km/h but their speed limiters are set at 90 km/h.
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Old June 15th, 2014, 07:20 PM   #2011
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Appearently it's 80 km/h on regular roads and 90 km/h on motorways and expressways (motortrafikled). I guess most truck drivers do 90 km/h on 2+1 roads regardless of expressway status or not.
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Old June 15th, 2014, 09:51 PM   #2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
... Technically the UK allows 96 km/h but their speed limiters are set at 90 km/h.
Yes, but there is an exception to this limitation; lorries registered before 2000 are excluded from installing velocity limiters, so can legally drive up to 60 miles an hour on motorways. Also fully laden trucks, registered after 2000, going downhill may easily overrun limiters and still are legal as long as keep to the national max speed for the motorways.
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Old June 16th, 2014, 10:15 PM   #2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uppsala View Post
I think the Swedish behaviors on these roads are more dangerous than the Polish on these roads.
At least, it was rather stressing to the bloody foreigners like me.

The paintings of the roads led the vehicles to drive close the middle of the road. Even this was odd to me. The slower vehicle was expected (de facto: forced) to move right on the hard shoulder. Because one lane was usually not wide enough to drive two cars in parallel, the one approaching from the opposite direction, was forced to move the hard shoulder, too. Thus, the success of the overtaking was the responsibility of other drivers than the one overtaking.

One additional problem was the fact that the Swedes did not have a clear code for "I want to ovetake you". It was the responsibility of the driver of the slower vehicle to guess what the other one aims. Quite typical code was to tailgate to the distance of two meters and then flash the headlights. But the tailgater did not always overtake, but joined the group driving on the shoulder, still tailgating.

Because all of this miraculous hassle, I usually decided to avoid these wide 1+1 roads (or should 0.6+1+1+0.6 be a better designation) whenever possible and take smaller roads. That was a lucky move: I learned to know a lot of nice Swedish villages, little towns, and wonderful rural routes.
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Old June 17th, 2014, 02:19 PM   #2014
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E6 Halland

E6 through Halland features a new style of signage on most of the signs.

When was this introduced? Is there more background information?


E6-119 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-120 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-121 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-122 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-123 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-124 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr
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Old June 17th, 2014, 04:46 PM   #2015
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Halland has had those exit nr on the signs a long time now, pisses me off that Skåne still have the extra tiny ad-on exit sign.
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Old June 17th, 2014, 09:02 PM   #2016
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Swedish wikipedia says:

"E6 through Halland was the first stretch of road in Sweden who were provided with exit numbers. This occurred on local initiatives already in 1994 when signs of Danish incision was mounted. The numbering was established from the start, given that the rest of the route would be numbered, which meant that the numbering started with No. 40 (Skottorp) and ended up with 61 (Kungsbacka N / Varla). This numbering system still exists today and is expanded both south and north. Interchange Numbering has been conducted by international model, for example, using Germany , Denmark and France this system. In places where several European highways is common is also the numbering common, hence the E6 numbering starts with the first in 2004 changed the signs to the yellow that was set up in other motorways in Sweden."
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Old June 17th, 2014, 09:09 PM   #2017
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Interesting, so these signs have been around for 20 years already. Quite a long stretch of E6 has these signs, from Skottorp to Morup (75 km).

I kind of like these signs. Swedish signs do not follow a standard layout and size, but are rather tailored to the local situation of placename length and number of place and object names. This makes it a bit messy.
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Old June 17th, 2014, 11:32 PM   #2018
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Interesting, so these signs have been around for 20 years already. Quite a long stretch of E6 has these signs, from Skottorp to Morup (75 km).

I kind of like these signs. Swedish signs do not follow a standard layout and size, but are rather tailored to the local situation of placename length and number of place and object names. This makes it a bit messy.
Standard?

I do not believe there is such a thing as a standard for advance direction signs. The Vienna Convention papers deliver a few examples, but they carefully refrain from proposing any layout to be the preferred one.
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Old June 17th, 2014, 11:43 PM   #2019
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Most countries that use fork signs have similar exit signs in terms of layout and size. Sweden however, does not use fork signs, but places a list of exit destinations, and the sign size varies considerably.

Another point being the alignment, objects and road numbers of different sizes means the destinations are not nicely aligned, but vary also. I think some objects may be better off at service signs (fuel station, camping, hospital, etc. follow exit xx)


E6-275 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-279 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-286 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-293 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-304 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr


E6-308 by Chriszwolle, on Flickr
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Old June 17th, 2014, 11:57 PM   #2020
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Most countries...
Almost every country has created their own design for the advance signs. But none of them deviates from The Standard, because there is none.

For example, France and Germany follow very different conventions. Still, both conventions are logical, and easy to be understood.

The signs in Finland and Sweden are rather alike. Still there are differences: Sweden consolidates the destination names and the service signs into a single sign while Finland puts them into separate signs. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and I do not know which one is better.
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