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Old July 23rd, 2016, 12:19 AM   #2781
Ingenioren
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Trollhättan is also known for being the hometown of one of the world's greatest car manufacturers (now defunct) . Cars made there were looked really weird to those unfamiliar with them, but once you've driven one you don't want anything else.
There is high hopes in this region for what will happend, there is now "National electric vehicle of Sweden" and they are hiring a sizeable number of engineers at the moment
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Old July 23rd, 2016, 04:17 PM   #2782
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The narrowest motorway profile in Sweden is 18,5m which indeed is less than most European Countries. Closer to Göteborg the road width increases to 21,5m though.
I thought the 18.5 metre profile had been demoted to expressway standard. That's not the case?
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Old July 27th, 2016, 11:00 AM   #2783
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Swedens highest paved road, Stekenjokk

Photos taken by me.









Bonus picture from around Dikanäs.

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Old July 27th, 2016, 11:30 AM   #2784
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Nice, that's the 'wilderness road'. I contemplated going there last month, but it was farther north while I was already looking at a 6000+ kilometer trip. Maybe some other time
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Old August 2nd, 2016, 08:42 PM   #2785
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Is there any official document or map indicating the routes of all actual Riksväg (R9-R99)?

I found a map on trafikverket.se. Are the routes on the map "correct"?

Is wikipedia up-to-date, all actual routes in the list?
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Which new motorways are currently under construction?
Which new motorways will be opened next?

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Old August 3rd, 2016, 02:43 AM   #2786
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The data in the National Road Database should hopefully be correct. It's the same base map as the one you linked, but here you can query it for details.

Of interest could be

Administrativa vägdata
* Vägkategori (Road category)
* Vägnummer (Road number)

Trafikuppgifter
* ÅDT totaltrafik (AADT, combine with this map)

Trafikregler
* Hastighetsgräns (Speed limit, not always up to date)

Väguppgifter
* Vägtyp (Road type)

For further details, use the info-arrow at the top right of the map and click the road segments.

EDIT: For actual routes per riksväg you could try searching OpenStreetMap relations here, filling in relation name as e.g. "Riksväg 32" and clicking the "Analyze on map" button on the relation info page.
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Old August 4th, 2016, 02:59 AM   #2787
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I haven't seen anyone here talking about this so I'll bring it up.

Trafikverket wants to lower the speed limit on all undivided 2-lane roads from 90 to 80 where the AADT is higher than 2000 vehicles per day. More info: http://www.trafikverket.se/om-oss/va...na-pa-vagarna/

In my county, Västerbotten, around 160 km would have the speed limit lowered. That includes almost 60km of E4 between Umeå and Skellefteå.

The governor of Västerbotten and all major politicians are against it: http://www.vk.se/1725221/landshovdingen-ryt er-ifran-mot-hastighetssankning.

The official reason is traffic safety, but the real reason is environmental bullshit. Last time the speed limits were lowered the bureaucrats basically told the politicians here straight up that they were lowering speed limits in sparsely populated areas to be able to raise the speed limits on certain motorway sections. The idea is called "climate compensation", thus to raise the speed limit somewhere it has to be lowered somewhere else.

This time, 1200km of divided roads will have the speed limit raised from 90 to 100km/h at the expense of undivided 2-lane roads. Generally, this is not a problem for people living in densely populated areas, where access to a motorway or divided 2+1 road is not far away. For more sparsely populated areas though, this will obviously have a major negative impact.

Two examples of stretches that would be lowered from 90 to 80 around here:

E12 Umeå - Obbola



E4 Umeå - Skellefteå



This is a complete joke.
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Old August 4th, 2016, 05:05 AM   #2788
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Bureaucrats being bureaucrats.. They always have a "von-oben"-attitude as their job is to promote one aspect out of many others to be imposed on the rest of the world, consequences be dared (not to say about the bigger picture, what would be good for the society at large). It's part of their job. With all the sub-optimization that follows, but doesn't hurt them nor their department of government.
As I've come to understand it though, it's up to the county to make the decision what speed limit there should be at a certain stretch (after recommendations from the Agency). I suppose then the county of Västerbotten could in practice stall the whole process if they wished to, though it would perhaps be the first time they openly did so.


Anyways, given the lay-offs in the traffic police corps I'd say there already are no speed limits today. Especially now in summer (vacation time) they are mostly placed next to touristy areas where there is likely to be some trouble and which are easily controlled (Ölandsbron) but not anywhere else.
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Old August 4th, 2016, 12:36 PM   #2789
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I tought the divided roads already had 100km/h. One easy way to work around this would be to lower narrow twisting roads to 60km/h instead, no? I would like to see more 120km/h motorways....
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Old August 4th, 2016, 06:05 PM   #2790
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Do Swedish drivers observe speed limits? Last time I was there they looked more like a suggestion, which is pretty much an obvious consequence of lowering speeds based on today's ubiquitous, almighty pollution concerns.
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Old August 4th, 2016, 06:09 PM   #2791
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I drove 2000 kilometers through Sweden in June, both on motorways and long-distance two-lane roads. I usually drive at or slightly over the speed limit if conditions allow, and I was often passed by Swedes going much faster.
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Old August 4th, 2016, 10:57 PM   #2792
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In school zones or population areas is the only places you need to respect the speed limit, I also suggest at night in moose country it's a good idea to keep speed reasonable close to recommended.
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Old August 4th, 2016, 11:31 PM   #2793
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When I see this sheer stupidity, then Austrian A2 comes to my mind with IG-L 100kmh zone on empty motorway loooooong before Graz on sunny saturday afternoon, area too sparsely populated with motorway hidden behind noise walls in deep gully
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Old August 4th, 2016, 11:48 PM   #2794
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When I see this sheer stupidity, then Austrian A2 comes to my mind with IG-L 100kmh zone on empty motorway loooooong before Graz on sunny saturday afternoon, area too sparsely populated with motorway hidden behind noise walls in deep gully
A lot of Austrian motorways have speed limit <130 due to environmental concerns (or is it an excuse to collect more fines?)
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old August 5th, 2016, 12:01 AM   #2795
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A lot of Austrian motorways have speed limit <130 due to environmental concerns (or is it an excuse to collect more fines?)
It´s more or less acceptable around Innsbruck, valley is pretty deep and continuously urbanized and also during foggy days and heavy traffic, but driving 30+ kms on empty m-way...
Even the fines are doubled, becuase it´s ecological violation, not StVO violation.
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Old August 5th, 2016, 11:01 AM   #2796
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Do Swedish drivers observe speed limits?
They used to observe earlier.

Then, in early 1990's, some moron invented that the speed limit had to be lowered to 90 km/h on motorways for whatever reason, and that happened. About nobody obeyed, and Swedes noticed that the sky did not fall. The speed limits were restored a couple years later, but the Swedish disciplined driving style was already gone. Since that, Swedes have adopted all the bad habits earlier dedicated to German motorways.
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Old August 5th, 2016, 04:21 PM   #2797
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Originally Posted by metasmurf View Post
The official reason is traffic safety, but the real reason is environmental bullshit. Last time the speed limits were lowered the bureaucrats basically told the politicians here straight up that they were lowering speed limits in sparsely populated areas to be able to raise the speed limits on certain motorway sections. The idea is called "climate compensation", thus to raise the speed limit somewhere it has to be lowered somewhere else.
This is your typical symbolic measures that annoy people but don't do anything to reduce CO2 emissions. One forest fire has way more impact than lowering the speed limit from 100 to 90 on low volume roads.

In addition, anyone driving a car with a real-time fuel consumption indication knows that other factors have a much larger influence on fuel consumption, such as driving into a headwind, roundabouts, traffic signals, traffic congestion, etc.

Not to mention that CO2 emissions are a global problem and Swedish policy to reduce speed limits on rural roads won't have the slightest effect on global warming. The effect is so small it can't even be measured, it's a typical paper solution that doesn't have any effect in reality.
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Old August 5th, 2016, 05:01 PM   #2798
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They used to observe earlier.

Then, in early 1990's, some moron invented that the speed limit had to be lowered to 90 km/h on motorways for whatever reason, and that happened. About nobody obeyed, and Swedes noticed that the sky did not fall. The speed limits were restored a couple years later, but the Swedish disciplined driving style was already gone. Since that, Swedes have adopted all the bad habits earlier dedicated to German motorways.
Some utterly ridiculous regulations like this one have the negative effect to make people more keen in disobeying rules, even when rules are reasonable. So, it's better to have more lax and reasonable rules that can be easily respected and enforced, rather than crazy regulations that are highly impractical to respect and enforce.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old August 6th, 2016, 04:08 AM   #2799
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There are speed traps around some places on the main highway routes enforced through cameras(riksvägarna/europavägarna), else it's basically up to your own judement. Or as a former neighbour of mine said, "as long as there's gravel road I'll continue drive there straight up drunk to get home from the party as usual". Well, a moose weights more than a usual small car neverthenless...
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Old August 6th, 2016, 05:50 AM   #2800
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Originally Posted by MattiG View Post
They used to observe earlier.

Then, in early 1990's, some moron invented that the speed limit had to be lowered to 90 km/h on motorways for whatever reason, and that happened. About nobody obeyed, and Swedes noticed that the sky did not fall. The speed limits were restored a couple years later, but the Swedish disciplined driving style was already gone. Since that, Swedes have adopted all the bad habits earlier dedicated to German motorways.
This timing is very curious. The USA did the same thing (90 km/h motorway speed limit) in 1974, loosened it slightly by allowing some 105 km/h speed limits on rural motorways in 1986, and finally abandoned the federal speed limit rules in 1995, as it was a failure

And just then Sweden did it
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