daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 17th, 2010, 12:02 AM   #641
kanterberg
Registered User
 
kanterberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 176
Likes (Received): 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Those are indirect numbers. You're not on E20 yet, but the road is leading towards E20. It works quite well. I also seen it in Denmark and even Germany (although not frequently).
Quote:
Originally Posted by rarse View Post
Can anyone tell me why is there sometimes a dotted rectangle line inside the rectangle around road number on the signs?
Sometimes you’ll also see control cities signed indirectly, but it’s done a little differently depending on country.


Sweden uses the dotted line around the road number. In this case, the E4/E6 interchange is coming up and Stockholm is signed as a control city.


In Germany they usually put upcoming road numbers at the bottom instead. It’s the exact same principle.

Personally I prefer the German layout as it makes it even more clear what road number leads where. A combination would be the best solution IMO; sign indirectly at the bottom with a dotted line around the road number(s).

Photo credit:@Chriszwolle (both pictures)
kanterberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old August 17th, 2010, 12:56 AM   #642
rarse
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 188
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Morsue View Post
Concerning the part north of Stockhom to Luleå it will probably not become motorway the whole way during the next 30-50 years. There are no plans at the moment. Going north from Stockholm you have motorway up until Gävle, then only a few scattered sections along the way.
Between Gävle (Skog) and Sundsvall (Kvissleby) (except around Iggesung and Hudiksvall) AADT is 6.250 - 7.300 vehicles per day.

Between Sundsvall (Harmosand) and Umea (except around Örnsköldsvik) AADT is 4.000 - 7.000 vehicles per day.

Between Umea and Lulea (except around Skelleftea and Pitea) AADT is 3.500 - 5.000 vehicles per day.

Since Sweden's bottom value for making a 4 lane road is 10.000 - 12.000 AADT, except for the busier stretches, there probably is no plan and need for upgrading or making a motorway.

I think 2+1 road would fit just OK.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Morsue View Post
Actually, once there was a parliamentary decision that no road north of Sundsvall could be classified as a motorway! No matter the standard. Fortunately, this has since been repealed.
Nice to hear strange parliamentary decision about no road north of Sundsvall could be classified as a motorway was repealed. If there will once be a need for a motorway, it should be made.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Morsue View Post
section near Ljungby that is 2+1, about 31 km
Because of priority triangle Stockholm - Gothenburg - Malmö and from Gothenburg to Oslo to have a high standard 4-lane road, this section with AADT 10.000 - 11.000 vehicles per day will be upgraded to motorway in the near future according to Trafikverket.




Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post
In Germany they usually put upcoming road numbers at the bottom instead. It’s the exact same principle.

Personally I prefer the German layout as it makes it even more clear what road number leads where. A combination would be the best solution IMO; sign indirectly at the bottom with a dotted line around the road number(s).
I agree with you on both! German model with dots.
rarse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 02:43 AM   #643
kanterberg
Registered User
 
kanterberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 176
Likes (Received): 4

E18/E20 continued…
Trafikplats Norrplan (116) – Trafikplats Gräsnäs (121)

We follow E18/E20 eastbound from Örebro for another 40 km. This motorway was built in 1999 and about half of it using the existing road corridor. The West Mainline (Västra stambanan), a double-track railway between Gothenburg and Stockholm, runs parallel to the motorway for the first 20 km.

AADT is between 14000 – 16000 vehicles per day.




(1). Leaving Örebro and roadway lights behind.


(2). A fresh coat of asphalt, but only for the right lane.


(3). The “red asphalt” was used intensively on motorways for a few years in Sweden because it supposedly provides better grip in winter conditions and is more resistant to studded tires.


(4). As this section has two road numbers, control cities are signed seperately. However, both of them leads to Stockholm and the distance is the same. Also notice the shoulder rumble strips, looks like they were recently added.


(5).


(6).


(7). Here’s an interesting sign when you consider Sweden is arguably one of the most secular countries on earth. A temporary sign for “Vägkyrka” (Road church); a church that stays open at least five hours per day and is easily accessible for motorists . It’s a temporary sign because road churches are typically only open during summer.


(8). Arboga Södra (south). Take this exit to go on the old pre-1999 alignment.


(9). Rest-area Högsjön.


(10). I missed the sign but we have now crossed into Västmanlands län (Vestmannia province)


(11). The West Mainline (Västra stambanan) runs parallel to the motorway up until here.


(12). This sign is outdated according to the new standard. It should show the logo of the chain (in this case McDonald’s and Dinners) together with the restaurant symbol, just like it does for the gas stations (OK/Q8 and Statoil).


(13).


(14). IMO the median here is not wide enough to do without a barrier… there’s also a vehicle inspection facility here. The center-right government recently abolished the monopoly on vehicle inspection. Since July 1st of this year, periodic vehicle inspection can be performed by any company accredited by SWEDAC (Swedish Board for Accreditation and Conformity Assessment)


(15). Approaching the E18/E20 interchange at Trafikplats Gräsnäs. They say that all “all roads lead to Rome”, but in Sweden they all lead to Stockholm. If Stockholm is your destination E18 would be better for the northern suburbs and E20 for the southern suburbs.


(16). Do we wanna go north or south of lake Mälaren?
kanterberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 03:16 AM   #644
Schweden
Registered Loser
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Barcelona/Gothenburg
Posts: 558
Likes (Received): 40

What a cliffhanger
Schweden no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 10:37 AM   #645
Morsue
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 1,282
Likes (Received): 46

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post
We follow E18/E20 eastbound from Örebro for another 40 km. This motorway was built in 1999 and about half of it using the existing road corridor. The West Mainline (Västra stambanan), a double-track railway between Gothenburg and Stockholm, runs parallel to the motorway for the first 20 km.
This is not automobile-related, but that's not Västra stambanan but Mälarbanan (The Lake Mälaren line) between Stockholm and Örebro via Västerås. Västra stambanan goes a bit further south doing Stockholm-Katrineholm-Hallsberg-Gothenburg.

But these are nice pictures, however
Morsue no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 10:51 AM   #646
kanterberg
Registered User
 
kanterberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 176
Likes (Received): 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by Morsue View Post
This is not automobile-related, but that's not Västra stambanan but Mälarbanan (The Lake Mälaren line) between Stockholm and Örebro via Västerås. Västra stambanan goes a bit further south doing Stockholm-Katrineholm-Hallsberg-Gothenburg.

But these are nice pictures, however
You're absolutely right, my mistake. I need to accept the fact that I know a lot more about roads than I do about railways...
kanterberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 12:38 PM   #647
BWG95
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Uppsala
Posts: 83
Likes (Received): 5

That E18/E20 part is indeed a really nice motorway, which really could have higher speed than just 110 km/h. Come on Trafikverket, 120 at least?
BWG95 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 06:04 PM   #648
rarse
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 188
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post
(3). The “red asphalt” was used intensively on motorways for a few years in Sweden because it supposedly provides better grip in winter conditions and is more resistant to studded tires.
So I suppose driving on the right lane is "faster".



Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post

(4). As this section has two road numbers, control cities are signed seperately. However, both of them leads to Stockholm and the distance is the same. Also notice the shoulder rumble strips, looks like they were recently added.
Great



Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post
(7). Here’s an interesting sign when you consider Sweden is arguably one of the most secular countries on earth. A temporary sign for “Vägkyrka” (Road church); a church that stays open at least five hours per day and is easily accessible for motorists . It’s a temporary sign because road churches are typically only open during summer.
I remember I saw on German A3 there is "Autobahnkirche".



Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post

(14). IMO the median here is not wide enough to do without a barrier…
I just wanted to comment that those medians without barrier looks US-like. Here it looks more narrower to me.



Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post
(15). Approaching the E18/E20 interchange at Trafikplats Gräsnäs. They say that all “all roads lead to Rome”, but in Sweden they all lead to Stockholm. If Stockholm is your destination E18 would be better for the northern suburbs and E20 for the southern suburbs.
Great

Thank you for the photos.
rarse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 09:15 PM   #649
Danielk2
DanielKK
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Dronninglund
Posts: 670
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:

(12). This sign is outdated according to the new standard. It should show the logo of the chain (in this case McDonald’s and Dinners) together with the restaurant symbol, just like it does for the gas stations (OK/Q8 and Statoil).
Where is this new standard implemented??

I haven't seen it anywhere in Sweden.
__________________
thinkmetric
Danielk2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 09:42 PM   #650
Morsue
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 1,282
Likes (Received): 46

Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielk2 View Post
Where is this new standard implemented??

I haven't seen it anywhere in Sweden.
I've seen it on many places along the E4.
Morsue no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 09:51 PM   #651
Shifty2k5
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Uppsala
Posts: 535
Likes (Received): 157

I'm planning a trip to "österleden" (road 111 in Helsingborg) this sunday. It is currently U/C from regular 1x1 to 2x2 "stadsmotorväg". I'll take some pics and upload them here just for you guys
Shifty2k5 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 10:50 PM   #652
Biesiada
Fanklub Warsaw Spire 220m
 
Biesiada's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Warszawa
Posts: 131
Likes (Received): 6

compared to european motorways the surfaces of these roads seem to be very porous, uneven, slow, noisy but with a good grip.
Biesiada no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 11:06 PM   #653
Shifty2k5
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Uppsala
Posts: 535
Likes (Received): 157

Quote:
Originally Posted by Biesiada View Post
compared to european motorways the surfaces of these roads seem to be very porous, uneven, slow, noisy but with a good grip.
They are!

I would like to point out that lack of funds in infrastructure seems to be a Scandinavian problem though, i.e. Swedish and Danish motorways are basically of the same standard in my opinion, and motorways in Norway are even worse.

But the quality of the surface is ofcourse not comparable to that of countries such as the Netherlands, Italy (AS) etc.
Shifty2k5 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2010, 11:42 PM   #654
kanterberg
Registered User
 
kanterberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 176
Likes (Received): 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielk2 View Post
Where is this new standard implemented??

I haven't seen it anywhere in Sweden.
This is the new standard (taken from transportstyrelsen.se)


Here's a version of it on the E4
kanterberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2010, 03:12 AM   #655
kanterberg
Registered User
 
kanterberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 176
Likes (Received): 4

Approaching Stockholm from the east
Road 222

Trafikplats Insjön – Trafikplats Lugnet



I recently posted a series of pictures from the E4, the busiest motorway going in and out of Stockholm. I thought it might be interesting to compare it to the 222, which has the lowest AADT of all motorways entering the city (E4/E18/E20/73).

The 222 is one of very few county roads with motorway standard. It runs from Trafikplats Insjön about 25 km east of Stockholm and connects the archipelago to the capital. It also serves the municipalities of Nacka and Värmdö with a population of 88 000 and 38 000 people, respectively.

For some reason this motorway does not have numbered exits. The AADT is 25000 – 50 000 vehicles per day, but with significant seasonal variation. It was built between 1968 and 1975.


(1). The motorway starts 20 km east of Stockholm. Before the motorway starts it is a 2+1 autostrasse/semi-motorway.


(2). The shoulder has been converted to a bus lane, which can also be used by taxis and paratransit vehicles.


(3).


(4).


(5).


(6). The bus lane obviously has to end at the exit.


(7).


(8). There is a gap in the motorway across the Skurubron (bridge). This is an old arch bridge built long before the motorway and is the only place to cross the Skurusund. Being the only crossing-point, it would be impossible for slower moving vehicles to leave the island if it was signed as a motorway.


(9). It’s 2x2 across the bridge, but there is no acceleration lane. With a stop-sign at the entrence it creates a nightmare in rush hour traffic.
There are plans to build a new motorway bridge within a few years.


(10). The motorway begins again right after the bridge.


(11). Exit at Saltsjöbaden for park-and-ride arrangements. The sign also shows the next commuter train departures to Slussen, a major traffic-node with access to the metro, buses and inner city boats.


(12).


(13). This exit leads to the Saltsjöbaden-motorway, possible the only Swedish motorway maintained by a municipality and not the state (this explains why it doesn't have a road number).


(14). This is a bus-only exit and leads to a bus stop and a police checkpoint.


(15). At this point the AADT is almost 50 000. This section used to be three lanes, but the right lane was converted to a bus lane (but only westbound).


(16). Congestion charge in Stockholm, in effect weekdays from 06:30 to 18:29. From 2011 foreign registered cars will no longer be exempt from the charge.


(17). The 222 connects to the Södra länken, the southern part of the half finished ring road. For some reason beyond my understanding they’ve chosen to do a left side exit. The logical and reasonable solution would have been to have the motorway continue into the tunnel with a normal exit for Stockholm Centrum. It's just a question of painting the lanes right...


(18).


(19). The road numbers on the white sign at the exit show a detour in case the Södra länken tunnel is closed.
kanterberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2010, 01:31 PM   #656
rarse
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 188
Likes (Received): 1

Thanks for this awesome report and photos.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post
(2). The shoulder has been converted to a bus lane, which can also be used by taxis and paratransit vehicles.
Besides Belgrade motorway trough the city I think this is the next time I see a bus lane on the motorway shoulder.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post
(12).
C is for Center?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post
(16). Congestion charge in Stockholm, in effect weekdays from 06:30 to 18:29. From 2011 foreign registered cars will no longer be exempt from the charge.
What does that actually mean and on how is / will be from 2011 charged?
rarse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2010, 01:37 PM   #657
Morsue
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 1,282
Likes (Received): 46

Quote:
Originally Posted by rarse View Post
C is for Center?
Yes, it's Centrum in Swedish.
Morsue no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2010, 01:39 PM   #658
Morsue
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 1,282
Likes (Received): 46

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanterberg View Post
[SIZE="4"]Congestion charge in Stockholm, in effect weekdays from 06:30 to 18:29. From 2011 foreign registered cars will no longer be exempt from the charge.
Really? Where did you receive this information? I thought the problem was that a government can't levy taxes on citizens of another country, so how will this work exactly?
Morsue no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2010, 01:45 PM   #659
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,582
Likes (Received): 19372

It would be a bad idea anyway. Other than most central and western European countries, the amount of foreign cars in Stockholm will be pretty low. I'm not sure if it's worth the effort and non-hospitality to tax those few foreign cars as well.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2010, 02:38 PM   #660
Morsue
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Stockholm
Posts: 1,282
Likes (Received): 46

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
It would be a bad idea anyway. Other than most central and western European countries, the amount of foreign cars in Stockholm will be pretty low. I'm not sure if it's worth the effort and non-hospitality to tax those few foreign cars as well.
Of course, the number of cars won't be as high as in [insert country close to the Netherlands], but there is quite a lot of foreign cars. Especially Finnish and Estonian since we have ferry connections to those countries. But I'm unsure as to the percentage compared to other nations.
Morsue no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium