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Old January 11th, 2012, 01:11 AM   #1141
häggblom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riiga View Post
Cool picture häggblom! When was the roundabout built, and did it replace an intersection or did the motorway just continue before? I ask because I was intrigued by this since the sign that says "GÄVLE" just before the roundabout is green, i.e. motorway coloured.
Yes, you are correct. The roundabout was built late 90´s or like 2000, before that it was a small, really old and crappy grade separated interchange instead.
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Old January 14th, 2012, 12:36 AM   #1142
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The motorway network around Stockholm city as planned in the 60´s

The traffic jams of today would probably be waaay less if it all had been built.

Note that the medium sized lines are also real motorways, eleveted and in tunnels through the inner city!

Last edited by häggblom; January 14th, 2012 at 12:53 AM.
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Old January 14th, 2012, 01:41 AM   #1143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by häggblom View Post
The motorway network around Stockholm city as planned in the 60´s

The traffic jams of today would probably be waaay less if it all had been built.

Note that the medium sized lines are also real motorways, eleveted and in tunnels through the inner city!
I'm not sure about that the medium sized lines are also real motorways. Söderleden exist and that road is not signed like a motorway. Parts of it looks like a motorway, but there are not motorway signs on it. So I think the medium sized lines are not real motorways. I think they are more like bigger roads similar to motorways.
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Old January 14th, 2012, 02:39 AM   #1144
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I'm not sure about that the medium sized lines are also real motorways. Söderleden exist and that road is not signed like a motorway. Parts of it looks like a motorway, but there are not motorway signs on it. So I think the medium sized lines are not real motorways. I think they are more like bigger roads similar to motorways.
Yeah, I know they aren´t real motorways today, but they were planned to be

The few that became built: Söderleden, Centralbron and Klarastrandsleden. And Klarastrandsleden were supposed to run elevated over the railroadtracks as a motorway. Instead of being a normal 2-lane road, as it is today... Swedens most heavily trafficked 2-lane road also I think.... :/
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Old January 14th, 2012, 02:45 AM   #1145
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Here is a taste of the planned IC of Klarastrandsleden (running partly over the railroad tracks) and Rådmansleden

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Old January 14th, 2012, 11:34 AM   #1146
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It appears that all never-built motorways which were supposed to connect to the Essingeleden actually had their interchanges built. For instance the Brommagrenen interchange is now downscaled and partially an unused green strip and bicycle path.
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Old January 14th, 2012, 02:06 PM   #1147
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I'm only wondering how much demolition all of that would have needed. The example of Tegelbacken seems rather sad to me.
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Old January 16th, 2012, 12:51 PM   #1148
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
It appears that all never-built motorways which were supposed to connect to the Essingeleden actually had their interchanges built. For instance the Brommagrenen interchange is now downscaled and partially an unused green strip and bicycle path.
That is correct. It becomes especially evident in the (now) needless complexity of Pampaskopplet

Google maps

Here, two motorway spurs were never added to the junction; Huvudstaleden, running towards the northwest, and a link to route E4 (sometimes simply named "E4-länken"), running north to intersect the E4 at Järva Krog. Solna Municipality still reserves the right-of-way for "E4-länken" mostly intact, although a surface road in this position is highly unlikely to ever be built. The right-of-way for Huvudstaleden has been partially developed with housing in the past 10 years, but you can still easily see it snaking through Huvudsta as a green strip, eventually connecting with the extant part of Huvudstaleden near the boundary with Sundbyberg.

Last edited by yako; January 16th, 2012 at 12:56 PM. Reason: Wrote some more...
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Old January 30th, 2012, 08:35 PM   #1149
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Has anyone tried driving from either Stockholm or Gothenburg (where Volvo HQ is located) all the way up to the Ice Hotel in Jukkasjarvi???

According to Google Maps, the driving time ranges from 14-19 hours (using the E4 roadway).

Hopefully for me, I'm hoping it would take less than the 14-19 hours since I will drive beyond the speed limit (probably 140 km/h if ever I rent an XC vehicle from Volvo)

Also, yeah, has anyone here done this before?

I ask that because atm, I envision myself driving to the Ice Hotel instead of taking a plane to Kiruna Airport.

What do you guys think?
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Old January 30th, 2012, 09:50 PM   #1150
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I'd recommend flying, since it saves you time as well as money in this case. With SAS, the cost for flying is ~2 000 SEK. Going by car (assuming 0.8 L/10 km) is ~3 000 SEK. I'd also suggest not driving more than 10 km/h over the limit, especially not on the E4. Going by train is another alternative, costing about 1 200 SEK and taking the same time as going by car. (All prices are including return).
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Old January 30th, 2012, 09:58 PM   #1151
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What do you guys think?

I dare to say that northern Sweden has very little things to offer for the cost getting there. But it's great if you like to see few people and lot's of nature; woods and lakes.
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Old January 30th, 2012, 11:25 PM   #1152
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Watch out for the speed cameras...
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Old February 2nd, 2012, 11:48 AM   #1153
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Yeah it looks like you guys are right on this. Better to take plane from Gothenburg or Stockholm going to Kiruna Airport. Then from there, I just rent a car (I just saw that Avis has a branch there in Kiruna Airport).

Then only 15 kilometer drive to Icehotel Jukkasjarvi
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Old February 2nd, 2012, 10:35 PM   #1154
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Yeah it looks like you guys are right on this. Better to take plane from Gothenburg or Stockholm going to Kiruna Airport. Then from there, I just rent a car (I just saw that Avis has a branch there in Kiruna Airport).

Then only 15 kilometer drive to Icehotel Jukkasjarvi
As do Europcar. A bit more expensive, but better cars.
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Old February 2nd, 2012, 10:50 PM   #1155
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Hopefully for me, I'm hoping it would take less than the 14-19 hours since I will drive beyond the speed limit (probably 140 km/h if ever I rent an XC vehicle from Volvo)
I would recommend not to take this approach. You will learn why.
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Old February 3rd, 2012, 11:41 PM   #1156
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Quote:
Originally Posted by häggblom View Post
The motorway network around Stockholm city as planned in the 60´s

The traffic jams of today would probably be waaay less if it all had been built.

Note that the medium sized lines are also real motorways, eleveted and in tunnels through the inner city!
The City would be way less nice aswell so im glad they didnt build all this.
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Old February 6th, 2012, 01:26 PM   #1157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by häggblom View Post
Here is a taste of the planned IC of Klarastrandsleden (running partly over the railroad tracks) and Rådmansleden

Where did you find this; could u please link the site?
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Old February 13th, 2012, 04:02 PM   #1158
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Some depressing news from Stockholm...

The County Administrative Board (Länsstyrelsen) has released their proposals for cleaner air in Stockholm. As expected, it's the PM10 and NO2 values that are constantly too high, especially in winter.

Let's put it this way, the people who wrote the report probably don't own a car.

The report will be circulated for comments from the city councils in the Stockholm region, but they are hoping to implement these measures as soon as possible:

Short term:

- Reduced use of studded tyres. Today it's only on Hornsgatan, I suppose we can expect this ban on most of the major streets in the city by next winter. The legislation is already in place and it's up the the city council to decide.

- Reduced speeds. The 90-zone on E18 before by Danderyd has already been reduced to 70 (they claim this has reduced PM10 and NO2 there by as much as 25%). Expect to see lower speeds on the E4 as well, north and south of the city. They might even consider a 50(!) kmh speed limit on Essingeleden during the winter months.

This can also be done without any change in legislation. The County Administrative Board can change the speed limit on any national road in its jurisdiction, city councils can do the same on city streets.

- Increased congestion chargeThis will take an act of Parliament, but the report calls for increased congestion charges and a new congestion charge on Essingeleden, even before the Förbifart Stockholm (bypass) is finished.

- Environmental zones á la Germany. The report calls for a 3-zone system with only the cleanest cars being allowed to enter the city. This could also be combined with the congestion charge as license plates are read automatically; a low congestion charge for type 1 vehicles, a higher charge for type 2 and a ban (with an automatic fine in the mail) for type 3 vehicles.

This will also take an act of Parliament before it can be introduced.

- Reduced use of sand on winter streets. Interestingly enough, there's nothing about traffic safety in the report. If studded tyres are banned and sand isn’t used, it is an obvious safety problem. Especially when the temperature drops below -5 and salt is no longer effective.

- Increased street sweeping and dust binding.

Long term:

- Reducing car access to the city by taking away traffic lanes, street side parking and increasing the number of speed bumps etc.


City streets where (red) PM10 levels exceed the EU environmental quality standards:


Major roads...
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Old February 13th, 2012, 04:14 PM   #1159
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Lower speed limits reduce emissions (provided that it is strongly enforced), but emissions are not the same as concentrations (i.e. air quality). Several trials in the Netherlands have shown that reducing the speed limit has a negliglible effect on air quality, especially because peaks in concentration are not caused by traffic but by weather conditions.

Unfortunately, the people who make such decisions (politicians) know very little about the material. 25% less emissions is absolutely not the same as 25% less air pollution.

I'm sorry for you guys to have fallen into oppressionist symbolic politics with no demonstrable effect.

Unfortunately restricting motor vehicle access does not result in better air quality per se, even lower volumes of traffic may create more congestion as traffic lanes are taken away. 50% less capacity does not necessarily mean an equal drop in traffic levels. It will more likely result in more environmentally unfriendly stop-and-go traffic. It's far more effective to give incentives to buy cleaner vehicles, especially with the introduction of euro 6 emission standards for taxis and delivery vans. It's no surprise the roads with the worst air quality are usually not the motorways, but city streets with just a fraction of motorway traffic volumes.

Policy like this has absolutely nothing to do with a better environment. The environmental circumstances are absused to oppress motorists.
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Old February 13th, 2012, 05:02 PM   #1160
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How can the Netherlands be a good referance point? How many of the cars on your roads have spiked tyres?
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