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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:05 AM   #24501
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Dubai World will publish a message on its Web site today explaining to creditors how it would like to restructure $26 billion of debt, Abu Dhabi-based Alrroya Aleqtissadiya reported, citing an unidentified banker.
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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:09 AM   #24502
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And ...? What has that to do with the Burj, or Emaar (the developer)?
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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:16 AM   #24503
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From an Australian news website; it makes an interesting point.

Quote:
Omens of Doom: Dubai’s Burj Khalifa Tower

http://www.crikey.com.au/2010/01/07/...khalifa-tower/

It is a colossus, towering over the Dubai skyline. The company behind it claims to have made a successful return of 10 percent. The local paper, the Khaleej Times, did not shy away from hyperbole, seeing the building as “an example of human courage and man’s ability to dream and deliver”, giving the world “an achievement difficult to surpass”.

The Burj Khalifa Tower, renamed in tribute to Dubai’s bailout donor, Abu Dhabi’s Sheik Khalifa, dwarfs all that have come before it. It is a monstrous compilation of gimmicks in some ways, another addition to the mix of Vegas-styled faux islands, shopping centres and ski runs. Dubai portends to be a place of trickery, entertainment and massive expense accounts. The building itself boasts 200 floors, and rises to 828 meters. It promises to be the home of the first Armani Hotel. Patrons are whisked between floors in elevators at the speed of 18 metres a second. But what does this building suggest about Dubai and the architectural madness that characterizes such efforts?

For one thing, the creation strikes deeply at the apocalyptic language of the recently concluded Copenhagen Climate Change conference. The Sheiks seem less interested in carbon footprints than oil-financed structures of glass and steel. They keep company with architects such as Adrian Smith, the designer of the Burj Khalifa and Cesar Pelli, who gave England the One Canada Square and Malaysia the Petronas Twin Towers.

Dubai suffers, like tyrants, from an overwhelming edifice complex. Its spending complex resembles the efforts of the Pharaohs and their pyramid projects, or those of the medieval Catholic Church: bigger is better, huge monuments to progress, humanity and God. Sometimes, the smaller the state, the more obsessed the efforts in building the Tower of Babel. Megalomania is the classic byproduct of inferiority complexes, often induced by money without sense.

All of these point to a thesis formulated in 1999 by Andrew Lawrence he dubbed the Skyscraper Index. These figures of modernity seem to precede periods of crisis. At low points of the business cycle, these architectural Cyclops seem to rise. The Empire State building was conceived in 1929, the same year of Black Tuesday (October 29) and the onset of the Great Depression. The Sears Tower of the 1970s towered over a society in the grip of stagflation and oil shocks. The monumental Petronas Twin Towers opened in 1997, the year when Asian currencies took a pummeling, humbling Asia’s ‘Tiger’ economies.

In the civilisational sense, this may also be true: the big building, or building project, is a symptom of decay. The American novelist Henry James certainly thought so, though he was thinking of it more in the aesthetic sense. In an economic sense, the great building project tends to forecast ruin. Athens passed quietly into the shade after the building of the Acropolis. Henry VIII of England and Christian IV of Denmark were builders who drained their treasuries, left magnificent buildings, yet failed consistently on the battlefield. The building efforts of the Pharaohs, as Paul Johnson pointed out in 2005, suggest a hubristic tendency that eventually will meet nemesis. The Wall Street Journal (Jan 5) was confident that such a building mania would not last, sniping at Dubai’s paltry credentials on ‘economic freedom, rule of law, hard work and sound management’ relative to such cities as Houston and Hong Kong. ‘Without these, nations and cities alike build nothing but foundations of sand.’

Given the precedents set by previous failed civilizations, the omens are not good. Dubai’s economy is in a mess. Sheik Khalifa has been generous to the tune of $10 billion. In an age of environmental sensitivities and proliferating green fan clubs, we might well be witnessing a dying breed. When the excitement does die down, the business of preventing Dubai from sliding into oblivion will begin.

Binoy Kampmark was a Commonwealth Scholar at Selwyn College, Cambridge. He lecturers at RMIT University, Melbourne.
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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:21 AM   #24504
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Emaar shares will rise
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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:24 AM   #24505
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It makes a girl swoon being taken up the Burj

or

Her eyes water.
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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:24 AM   #24506
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أنا لم أفهم?
برج دبي هو بناء. بر دبي هي مكان السوق في دبي
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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:28 AM   #24507
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
From an Australian news website; it makes an interesting point.
Oh yeah ... it mention carbon footprints and climate change ... very interesting points.
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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:42 AM   #24508
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...

Last edited by moscowboy; January 8th, 2010 at 02:53 AM.
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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:54 AM   #24509
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Quote:
it mention carbon footprints and climate change
because now in Dubai is The Dubai Forum on Architecture for Sustainable Societies
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Old January 7th, 2010, 11:55 AM   #24510
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....................and here live today on skyscrapercity banner....MERRY CHRISTMAS !!!!! : )
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Old January 7th, 2010, 12:19 PM   #24511
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
From an Australian news website; it makes an interesting point.
Great Article - Thanks
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Old January 7th, 2010, 12:22 PM   #24512
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The story of a still born Skyscraper

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The Burj Dubai and architecture's vacant stare
January 1, 2010 | 10:00 am



One of the odder, more complicated moments in the history of architectural symbolism will arrive Monday with the formal opening of the Burj Dubai skyscraper. At about 2,600 feet high -- the official figure is still being kept secret by developer Emaar Properties -- and 160 stories, the tower, set back half a mile or so from Dubai's busy Sheikh Zayed Road, will officially take its place as the tallest building in the world.


Designed by Adrian Smith, a former partner in the Chicago office of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the Burj Dubai is an impossible-to-miss sign of the degree to which architectural ambition -- at least the kind that can be measured in feet or number of stories -- has migrated in recent years from North America and Europe to Asia and the Middle East. It is roughly as tall as the World Trade Center towers piled one atop the other. Its closest competition is Toronto's CN Tower, which is not really a building at all, holding only satellites and observation decks, and is in any case nearly 900 feet shorter.


Monday's ribbon-cutting, though, could hardly come at a more awkward time. Dubai, the most populous member of the United Arab Emirates, continues to deal with a massive real estate collapse that has sent shock waves through financial markets around the world and forced the ambitious city-state, in a significant blow to its pride, to seek repeated billion-dollar bailouts from neighboring Abu Dhabi. Conceived at the height of local optimism about Dubai's place in the region and the world, this seemingly endless bean-stock tower, which holds an Armani Hotel on its lower floors with apartments and offices above, has flooded Dubai with a good deal more residential and commercial space than the market can possibly bear.


And so here is the Burj Dubai's real symbolic importance: It is mostly empty, and is likely to stay that way for the foreseeable future. Though most of its 900 apartments have been sold, virtually all were bought three years ago -- near the top of the market -- and primarily as investments, not as places to live. ("A lot of those purchases were speculative," Smith, in something of an understatement, told me in a phone interview.) And there's virtually no demand in Dubai at the moment for office space. The Burj Dubai has 37 floors of office space.



Though Emaar is understandably reluctant to disclose how much of the tower is or will be occupied -- it did not reply to e-mails sent this week on that score -- it's fair to assume that like many of Dubai's new skyscrapers it is a long, long way from being full. In that sense the building is a powerful iconic presence in ways that have little directly to do with its record-breaking height. To a remarkable degree, the metaphors and symbols of the built environment have been dominated in recent months by images of unneeded, sealed-off, ruined, forlorn or forsaken buildings and cityscapes. The Burj Dubai is just the latest -- and biggest -- in this string of monuments to architectural vacancy.


The combination of overbuilding during the boom years, thanks to easy credit, and the sudden paralysis of the financial markets in the fall of 2008 has created an unprecedented supply of unwanted or under-occupied real estate around the world. At the same time, rising cultural worry about environmental disaster or some other end-of-days scenario has produced a recent stream of books, movies and photography imagining cities and pieces of architecture emptied of nearly all signs of human presence.


And so in the same week that you could read the news that the Sahara Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas has entirely sealed off two of its three towers (and its buffet!) for the holiday season, citing slow demand, you could head to the multiplex to watch the movie version of Cormac McCarthy's novel "The Road," in which a father and son wander through a post-apocalyptic landscape where buildings for the most part have been reduced to burned-out shells.


And it's not just "The Road": The Roland Emmerich destruction-fest "2012" and the upcoming Denzel Washington vehicle "The Book of Eli" are full of similar images; Jason Reitman's "Up in the Air" moves its characters through a series of downsized companies where abandoned desk chairs swim in empty space.



Or you might discover online a group of photographs called "Empty L.A.," part of a series completed recently by Matt Logue, showing a number of recognizable intersections and stretches of freeway in and around the city where people, cars and other signs of life have been scrubbed away, presumably through digital manipulation -- and in the same trip around the Internet find a Q&A in Entrepreneur magazine with a man named Mike Enos, who runs a firm that encloses foreclosed houses, half-built hotels and other objects in plastic wrap and reports a surge in business since the economic collapse last year.


This movement in the direction of emptiness is profoundly difficult for contemporary culture -- and particularly American culture -- to grapple with. Occasional recessions and other setbacks aside, we assume that our national trajectory always moves toward fullness, that our cultural progress can be measured by how much new square footage we've created and occupied.


But that process has completely reversed itself in many of cities hardest hit by economic crisis. Detroit, as Rebecca Solnit put it in Harper's Magazine, "is now so depopulated that some stretches resemble the outlying farmland and others are altogether wild." And as P.J. Huffstutter reported recently in The Times, Hantz Farms is planning to buy and plant as many as 5,000 acres of land within the Detroit city limits.


In Los Angeles, there are parking lots where great towers, planned during the exuberant middle of the last decade, were supposed to be. At Rick Caruso's Americana at Brand complex in Glendale, every one of the development's 100 condominiums sat empty during 2009, even as shoppers browsed in the stores below. Occupancy wasn't allowed until more than half of the units had been sold, a mark that was finally reached in December.



As super-tall buildings go, the Burj Dubai is elegant. Smith is an unusually talented shaper of skyscraper form, as he proved at Shanghai's 88-story Jin Mao Tower, which he designed before leaving SOM in 2006. The Burj Dubai's profile, which Smith says is inspired by a range of local influences including sand dunes and minarets, grows more slender as it rises, like a plant whose upper stalks have been peeled away.


But the extent to which the building had to battle worries about the wisdom of its construction even before it was finished -- the way it seemed doomed, at least in financial terms, while it was still going up -- may be unique in the history of skyscraper design. In that sense it seems impossible to write about the Burj Dubai without at least mentioning the Tower of Babel, which also, if the biblical story and various historical sketches are to be believed, combined a tapering, corkscrew design with heaps of overconfidence.


Dubai's economy will recover, at least in some chastened form. But the hyper-confident Dubai that Smith's tower was designed to mark and call global attention to is already dead, as is the broader notion, which the emirate came to symbolize over the last decade, that growth can operate as its own economic engine, feeding endlessly and ravenously on itself.


If the Burj Dubai is too shiny, confidently designed and expertly engineered to be a ruin itself, it is surely the marker -- the tombstone -- for some ruined ideas.


-- Christopher Hawthorne
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Old January 7th, 2010, 01:07 PM   #24513
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Agentvlin , to show what crap sources you take your information from , and what a troll you are , read the freakin articles you post

"And so here is the Burj Dubai's real symbolic importance: It is mostly empty, and is likely to stay that way for the foreseeable future."

Its because the burj dubai interior work is not done yet , nothing is except for the gift shop , OB deck and elevators that take you from and to the shop ..

GOD damn these idiotic stupid lazy ass trashy news agencies of the west .... bored as hell with their unprofessonalisim , and especially lame and equally stupid trolls that post their work ...
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Old January 7th, 2010, 01:08 PM   #24514
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Well with all the poitical charnagin being tossed about in regards to this tower, can it be safe to butcher the famous line from the movie " field of dreams " and suggest now that it's built they won't come?
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Old January 7th, 2010, 01:14 PM   #24515
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Agentvlin , to show what crap sources you take your information from , and what a troll you are , read the freakin articles you post

"And so here is the Burj Dubai's real symbolic importance: It is mostly empty, and is likely to stay that way for the foreseeable future."

Its because the burj dubai interior work is not done yet , nothing is except for the gift shop , OB deck and elevators that take you from and to the shop ..

GOD damn these idiotic stupid lazy ass trashy news agencies of the west .... bored as hell with their unprofessonalisim , and especially lame and equally stupid trolls that post their work ...
QFT
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Old January 7th, 2010, 01:15 PM   #24516
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Quote:
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The story of a still born Skyscraper

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Old January 7th, 2010, 01:44 PM   #24517
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What i wonder is why i haven't seen any quality timelapses with the whole construction progress. I expected to see dozens, but i haven't seen a single one. By timelapse i mean a high quality video from the same angle/position with a constant photographing interval of at least 10-15 shots a day(so you can pick out cloudy, foggy pics and get constant lighting, and still get a smooth construction progress).
If i was the company that build the Burj Dubai i would have arranged for several angles, and with this many fans i thought some would do some of their own.
Something like this:

Please correct me if i'm wrong
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Old January 7th, 2010, 01:53 PM   #24518
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there is one, which is very good showing in Dubai Mall by the ice rink, i saw it yesterday showed right from foundation stage very interesting..

dont know the source...
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Old January 7th, 2010, 02:00 PM   #24519
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
From an Australian news website; it makes an interesting point.
Take every derogatory adjective and targeted passage in that article, and use those very words to describe the author's writing style. This is just another prime example of slanted, misinformed, pseudo-intellectual journalism.

This is why I openly, and humbly, plead for better art and design programs in our schools, in order to better inform the public on the argument of design for purpose and visa-versa. If this guy had any sense of design or familiarity with architectural engineering, he would know that this building is a perfect statement of tasteful design defined by brilliant technical savvy. Criticism of Dubai's excess is well founded, but that whole argument is secondary to the matter-of-fact engineering breakthroughs this building accomplishes -- and those breakthroughs are realized out of need, not the pursuit of excess.

The tower does not say ego judging by it's aesthetic appearance. Its design is a result of inspiration by local flora, local historical architecture, and much needed aerodynamics. The record-breaking height is only relevant to that very context -- a record was set before it and it is reasonable that it will be broken after time allows for technological advances. No doubt the previous record holder was also met with scorn for one arbitrary reason or the other.

I guess my point is, this tower should be excluded from all the criticism directed at Dubai regarding ego and hubris and excessive lifestyle and so on. The palm islands are a bit silly and hardly seem sustainable, and that whole Dubai Land project reeked of a stale "vegas" stench. But the Burj... it's a genuinely classy project.

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Old January 7th, 2010, 02:07 PM   #24520
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Originally Posted by DXBQuantum View Post
there is one, which is very good showing in Dubai Mall by the ice rink, i saw it yesterday showed right from foundation stage very interesting..

dont know the source...
Good, there is at least one. Since most of us won't stroll by the Dubai Mall in the near future lets hope it hits the internet some time soon.
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adrian smith, burj dubai, burj khalifa, downtown, dubai, dubai tower, emaar, megatall, middle east, rascacielos, sarajevo construction, skyscraper, spire, tallest, uae

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