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Old November 12th, 2008, 02:59 PM   #11801
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iMike View Post

He's refering to the The Ryugyong Hotel in Pyoungyang, North Korea that was topped out 16 years ago and left unfinished to this day at 330 meters (1083 ft).
Does anyone know what's happening with this hotel? Since the moderators have locked that thread it's hard to get information, maybe they will unlock it. The last reports showed there was work going on so maybe it's finally going to get completed.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 03:05 PM   #11802
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I am sure the countless reporters from Pyoungyang can't wait for that so they can report the latest updates.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 04:43 PM   #11803
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In one of the last pics showed here, the whole city looks soo dusty, I know they are in the middle of the desert but, doesn´t look attractive.

The height of the tower, wow, impresive.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 04:49 PM   #11804
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So do (not) countless so called great cities of the World, that for the majority of the year are wrapped in dark clouds and grey skies .... of course that's when it's not pouring rain or a blizzard of snow.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 06:07 PM   #11805
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurms Mackenzie View Post
I know that we're all focussed on height and the external appearance of the building. But perhaps the internal fit-out is now on the critical path so they are devoting their efforts to that instead of the work at the top...

...Or perhaps they might even be waiting for a special occasion to raise it to the 819m height? Stop panicking everyone!
Totally agree... I'm sure the construction is running at full speed everywhere besides the spire. I wouldn't be surprised if they wait for the jacking as long as they can. Making sure it won't delay the completion...

This is also what Emaar said in their last public announcement about the delay caused by so-called "height increase" (which we knew long time ago). They said the completion will be in summer 2009 and they will not reveal the height until then.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 06:34 PM   #11806
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Msradell View Post
Does anyone know what's happening with this hotel? Since the moderators have locked that thread it's hard to get information, maybe they will unlock it. The last reports showed there was work going on so maybe it's finally going to get completed.
last photo i seen was moment when the first panel of glass was being installed, then no more photo.

But doesn't matter at all, burj dubai is finishing next year.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 06:50 PM   #11807
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im sure the government will bankroll them... it is their prize development after all.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 07:55 PM   #11808
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Lol some weeks ago you were all talking about that economic recession wouldn't hurt Dubai that it would just keep doing everything like it had done before, but now you see, even Dubai get's to do deal with it.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 07:57 PM   #11809
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can't imagine the Burj is On Hold
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Old November 12th, 2008, 08:11 PM   #11810
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I dislake this towers.Terible designe.Is my opinion
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Old November 12th, 2008, 08:14 PM   #11811
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I dislake this towers.Terible designe.Is my opinion
It's only one tower
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Old November 12th, 2008, 08:25 PM   #11812
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It's like dominos. The more you build the more you fall when the economy goes bad: http://www.thenational.ae/article/20...AZINESLIDESHOW
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Old November 12th, 2008, 08:28 PM   #11813
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurms Mackenzie View Post
I know that we're all focussed on height and the external appearance of the building. But perhaps the internal fit-out is now on the critical path so they are devoting their efforts to that instead of the work at the top. On a building site it isn't always 100% full-steam-ahead on every part of the project....the focus usually shifts to whatever is likely to delay overall completion. I can imgaine they are working like crazy on the internals for the lower levels to get them ready to hand over (and get some cash flow).

I can't see that the credit cruch would be affecting the tower top-out unless Emaar have gone totally bankrupt (obviously I'm not suggesting they have). If the tower is going to be finished, which it is, then clearly they will get on and do things in the order that they see fit. I doubt we are going to end up with something like that building in North Korea!

As we often joke about here, the construction is not there for our amusement even though we do derive enjoyment from observing it. The construction managers will focus on whatever is most urgent for cash flow and the spire is perhaps no longer critical to overall completion dates.

Or perhaps they might even be waiting for a special occasion to raise it to the 819m height? Stop panicking everyone!
This will be the last tower anywhere to go on hold.
However I think some (most?) of the new proposals and projects in the early stages won't get finished.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 08:31 PM   #11814
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Burj Dubai tower on hold? I think not
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Old November 12th, 2008, 10:01 PM   #11815
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I think this is the best could happen to Dubai, because living gets affordable. As prices go down we'll see real life coming into the city. And if real demand is strong enough we will seem them once again building skyscrapers.

But I'm not sure if this is the right moment, not sure if they have build enough to be a true center of gravity, to attract people without all this hipe caused by construction activities.
And of course, as an enthusiast I want to see as many scrapers as possible built, and I want to see them built now!

Go Dubai, GO!
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Old November 12th, 2008, 11:24 PM   #11816
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Economic Slump Causes 50% drop in Burj Dubai Prices

Real estate prices in Downtown Burj Dubai, Emaar Properties' flagship development, have fallen at least 22%, while prices in the Burj Dubai tower itself have dropped as much as 50%, reported The National. UK-based property consultants Sherwoods said prices in the development, excluding the tower, had fallen from an average of 3,500 dirhams ($952) per square foot to Dhs2,700. Brokers said Downtown Burj Dubai had seen some of the biggest price drops in Dubai because prices had previously risen so sharply.

http://www.ameinfo.com/175305.html
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Old November 13th, 2008, 12:55 AM   #11817
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capn Jef View Post
That's...horrible. Source, please?
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/12/world/middleeast/12dubai.html?partner=permalink&exprod=permalink


DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — The world financial crisis has hit Dubai’s economy, slamming the brakes on its surging development and dimming its gold rush status. Development projects are being delayed, tourism is expected to decline and the government is even exploring how to begin collecting taxes, once almost unthinkable in this freest of free market enclaves.

All this is troubling news for the fortune seekers who flocked here in recent years but a surprisingly welcome development in some respects for one group: Emirati natives, the 10 percent or so who trace their lineage to the Bedouins and traders who once had this baking sliver of sand to themselves.

Emiratis have fretted for years over the loss of their culture, as social norms became more a product of the newcomers than of the nationals. Now, some are pinning their desires for a cultural salvation on the global economic downturn, which they hope will reduce the number of foreigners pouring into their country and give them a chance to reassert their customs and way of life.

“This is a blessing; we needed it,” Abdul Khaleq Abdullah, a political science professor at United Arab Emirates University, said of the fiscal crisis. “The city needs to slow down and relax. It’s good for the identity of our country.

“The city reached the summit, but we knew every time we got closer to the top, we got closer to the edge, too,” he added. “That’s the feeling inside each Emirati. When we felt like we had it all, we also felt like we will lose it all.”

The sudden cold snap in the economy, more than in societies in the West and the Far East, has forced a collective rethinking of the country’s direction. Perhaps the most difficult question is being asked by Emiratis themselves, who want to know where they fit into their own country. In an odd case of role reversal, the minority of nationals fear they are becoming like colonial lords in their own country.

“I’m not just concerned about my future, I’m concerned about the future of my country,” said Rashid Ali, 24. He and his friend Fahd Muhammad, 25, were the only Emiratis seated in a crowded city mall last week. “I’m concerned about our national identity,” Mr. Ali said.

He and Mr. Muhammad embody the challenges and contradictions that have roiled this country, forcing a top-to-bottom reassessment in the face of a financial crush that has cut off the easy money that was the lifeblood of the development boom.

The local population has largely been pacified by the largess of a gilded welfare state. For Mr. Ali and Mr. Muhammad, that meant free tuition and expenses for their university studies in Britain, including a monthly stipend of $1,258 while abroad.

Returning from school this year, they were given government jobs that pay $3,600 a month, which like all income here is tax free. When they plan to marry, they said, the government will give them each a piece of land free and about $200,000 to build a house, plus access to a 10- or 20-year interest-free loan.

That generosity is a problem now, as the government faces the prospect of having to control spending, raise revenue and encourage its own citizens to move into industries like finance and banking, which are now controlled by foreigners. Locals make up only 3 percent of the private work force, experts here said, with Emiratis opting for the shorter workday and higher pay of guaranteed government jobs.

The problem is that many like Mr. Ali and Mr. Muhammad say they enjoy what they get from the growth — the luxury villas and fancy cars — but not the costs in terms of social change. If the economy slows too much, however, the fear is that the costs may ultimately outweigh the benefits.

“Most people worry now, where is the welfare government?” said Salah Al Halyan, a financial consultant in Dubai, who explained the concerns of Emiratis. “Where is all the comfort? Where is my country? Who are all these people coming? The problem is the attitude of the nationals. They want to live on food stamps.”

As the two men walked amid a sea of foreigners in the mall, they alternated between pride in the development and anger about what they called a loss of control of their national identity.

“We are Bedouins, developed Bedouins, but we still have our traditions,” Mr. Ali said. “It’s all changing and disappearing.”

And then with deep sarcasm, he said, “What’s up, dude?” a phrase as alien to his culture as blue jeans and, now, as common in his city as blue jeans.
Sultan al-Suwaidi, a banker and member of the National Council, which serves as a kind of parliament or advisory board, said that he was hoping that the country would rethink its development model over the next decade and substantially reduce the number of foreigners. “We have to bring our percentages up to 40 percent; then there will be good control in our society,” he said.

The financial crisis has also forced Emiratis to confront another fundamental question: Would the United Arab Emirates respond to the problems as one country or as seven separate entities, with Dubai in particular taking a go-it-alone approach? The answer, so far, has been one country, financial analysts said.

Dubai and the six other emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates form a loose federation that gained independence in 1971. While always a commercial crossroads, a hub for trade and a center of the pearl industry, Dubai did not have its first concrete building until 1956. It relied on the Indian rupee as its currency until the early 1960s. Abu Dhabi, with its hefty oil reserves and huge wealth, was the political center of the emirates, its leader was the president of the federation.

At the highest levels, Dubai and Abu Dhabi worked together to transform Dubai into a global destination for investment and development. But there was also an undercurrent of competition, with Abu Dhabi taking a slower, more conservative, petro-fueled approach while Dubai moved so fast that, at times, it was compared to a theme park. But when the financial storms appeared, Dubai — with a debt of nearly $50 billion — turned to the federal government, which quickly agreed to inject billions of dollars.

“There is this question in the market whether Dubai is on its own, or is there a one-country approach,” said Marios Maratheftis, regional director of research at Standard Chartered, a Dubai-based bank. “There are signs there is a one-country approach.”

These are the kinds of issues that the founders of the Cultural and Scientific Association, a public-private group devoted to promoting Emirati culture, take up every Monday night, when they gather to debate and exchange ideas. The association’s new building was opened in January, but it usually stands empty.

On a recent Monday, 12 men sat in the lobby, designed to resemble a courtyard in a traditional house. They ate only traditional food, mostly beans and flat breads, and spoke a lot about the city’s demographic composition and its cultural identity, and how to get more Emiratis into the private work force.

“I hear this complaint over and over, but what is the solution?” said Abdul Ghaffar Hussain, a businessman and writer. “What should I do, go to the street with a stick and chase people out? You have to be reasonable.”

Bilal al-Bodour, a deputy minister of culture for the United Arab Emirates, walked through the building, showing it off with pride, and hope.

“You have to learn about yourself and where you are coming from, before you can know others,” he said. “Everybody is concerned about this. It’s just a matter of degrees.”
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Old November 13th, 2008, 01:12 AM   #11818
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dachacon View Post
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/12/world/middleeast/12dubai.html?partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

The local population has largely been pacified by the largess of a gilded welfare state. For Mr. Ali and Mr. Muhammad, that meant free tuition and expenses for their university studies in Britain, including a monthly stipend of $1,258 while abroad.

Returning from school this year, they were given government jobs that pay $3,600 a month, which like all income here is tax free. When they plan to marry, they said, the government will give them each a piece of land free and about $200,000 to build a house, plus access to a 10- or 20-year interest-free loan.

That generosity is a problem now, as the government faces the prospect of having to control spending.......

Are you kidding me? Is this what the locals are worried about? Losing these benefits.

A lot of people are about to lose their underwear here in the United States!


Sorry off subject but since there's no activity with construction, might as well keep this thread alive.
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Old November 13th, 2008, 01:22 AM   #11819
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A lot of people are about to lose their underwear here in the United States!
Haha... ain't that true...
Anyways, how come the construction is slowing?
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Old November 13th, 2008, 02:06 AM   #11820
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