daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments > DN Archives



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old October 25th, 2007, 12:06 PM   #41
tonyboy
Registered User
 
tonyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: perring parkway/makati
Posts: 683
Likes (Received): 7

preserve humankind's cultural heritage!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ELLIN View Post
A.E.K dont open the conversation of demolish the 2 buildings in front of the New Acropolis Museum in this thread cause i dont need forum-fights for this reason,there is a specific thread,we discuss that at hellenic agora

Happy tonyboy???
yes i am. thank you indeed.

i most sincerely support your cause:

Quote:
"The request for the return of the Parthenon Marbles is not made merely by the Greek nation or in the name of history, but in the name of the World's Cultural Heritage. Indeed, until restitution is made, the mutilated monument will be seen as a sad reproach to that heritage."


PROFESSOR EVANGELOS VENIZELOS
MINISTER OF CULTURE
keep up the good work ellen and do please carry on!
tonyboy no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old October 25th, 2007, 03:34 PM   #42
ELLIN
MOLON LAVE
 
ELLIN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Αthens
Posts: 869
Likes (Received): 46

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyboy View Post
yes i am. thank you indeed.

i most sincerely support your cause:



keep up the good work ellen and do please carry on!
Tonyboy thanks for your kind words.....the returning of the marbles from London will put an end to this sad story of the monuments,
Its new house the New Acropolis Museum is really nice,actually the photos are not describe the whole structure really well....its position and the area of Athens s situated is just amazing.....
I will keep you updated.....
Everyday new sculptures from the past museum are carried inside the new.......
a pic from the whole transer

The first marble have been transered,(a cow is transfered for sucrifice from a young for the celebration of the Panathenian)


one of the first marbel scultures (blue box) is aproaching to the open gate of "Parthenon room"

Realesed inside the museum!!!
__________________
WW-II German Reparations
http://www.greece.org/blogs/wwii/?page_id=764

Last edited by ELLIN; December 4th, 2007 at 12:55 AM.
ELLIN no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2007, 03:56 PM   #43
Alle
Registered User
 
Alle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: GŲteborg
Posts: 2,337
Likes (Received): 9

Very good design
__________________
Stop the censorship in the BiH forums

Castles And Fortresses [Alpe Adria] [Bosnia]
Alle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2007, 04:23 PM   #44
Giorgio
Registered User
 
Giorgio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 10,677
Likes (Received): 480

Quote:
Originally Posted by ELLIN View Post
oxx please min anoigeis afti tin sizitisi edo..
giati oxi;
tha mou arese poli na do ti exoun na poune i xeni gia afto to thema.
prepei na figoun.. sosta alla ti nomizoune i alli;
kai giati pezis ton exipnon pou mas les um mpori na milisoume gia afti tin sizitisi i oxi...member eisai san emas, oxi admin.
Giorgio no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2007, 04:30 PM   #45
ELLIN
MOLON LAVE
 
ELLIN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Αthens
Posts: 869
Likes (Received): 46

Giorgio apla sou leo afto,kai to enoo apolytos...
einai dropi na iparhoun antropoi pou einai Ellines kai na sou miazoun!!!!
exei ola ta haraktiristika tou Kakou Ellina....vlakodeis simperifores pou vlaptoun tin xora tous,Perifanos Ellinas otan se simferei kai me tin proti simfora i stravopatima tis patridas les efkola drepome pou eimai ellinas....ta thread sou anoigoun arnitikes sizitiseis gia tin Ellada otan oi perissoteroi prospathoume na deixoume to kalo tis prosopo....krima pou stin Austarlia pou agapame kai ektimoume iparhoun akoma atoma tou eidous sou...pou vazoun ton prosopiko tous egoismo pano apo ola...kai xrisimopoiun afto to politismeno thread gia na anoixoun kavgades....einai dropi na iparhoun Ellines san kai esena..
__________________
WW-II German Reparations
http://www.greece.org/blogs/wwii/?page_id=764

Last edited by ELLIN; October 25th, 2007 at 05:50 PM.
ELLIN no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2007, 09:24 AM   #46
Giorgio
Registered User
 
Giorgio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 10,677
Likes (Received): 480

den me xeris katholou.
apou ola ta ellinopeda stin australia prepie na eimai o pio perifanos....
entaxi, eisai neos akoma s'afto to forum kai afta pou thelis na dis gia mena einai to xalia. den kitazis ola ta ala pou kano gia tin patrida (kitaxe sta international forums, uparxoun apla threads apou mena mai ta kalitera fotografias apou tin xora mas).

you shouldn't be so ignorant, I am probarbly a better Greek than you will ever be and even from thousands of kilometres away my family and myself contribute to the Greek economy. Next year I plan to travel to Greece and do some community work...panta kanw kati kalo gia tin patrida ala klinis ta matia sou otan vlepis pou exw kani kati me to kalo.

dropi pou uparxoun ellines san ESENA...me ta matia klista...
Giorgio no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2007, 09:46 AM   #47
connected_
Registered User
 
connected_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Sydney
Posts: 305
Likes (Received): 15

What's with all the hostility? I'm Turkish, channel it all towards me lol
connected_ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2007, 08:54 PM   #48
ELLIN
MOLON LAVE
 
ELLIN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Αthens
Posts: 869
Likes (Received): 46

Australians calling for return of Parthenon Marbles


Australia's two most prestigious newspapers, "The Sydney Morning Herald" and "The Australian", are endorsing the return of the Parthenon Marbles to Greece on the occasion of the functioning of the new Acropolis museum.

Both daily newspapers, having circulations running into hundreds of thousands of copies each, are promoting in relevant reports events and lectures that will be beginning in Sydney this week on the issue of restoration work at the Acropolis and the New Acropolis Museum under the general title of "The Parthenon Project."

The newspaper "The Australian" mainly refers to the campaign for the return of the Parthenon Marbles and the New Acropolis Museum.
Some of the Acropolis marble sculptures kept in British museum





According to the report, the most noticeable element of the New Acropolis Museum, that is expected to open early next year, will be an empty room that will "await" the return of the Parthenon Marbles that were removed by Lord Elgin and are in the British Museum.

The report in the newspaper "The Sydney Morning Herald" refers to the historic event of the transfer and sale of Parthenoin Marbles by Lord Elgin.

Now, as the work on the restoration of the Parthenon is being completed and as the inauguration of the New Acropolis Museum is approaching, the time has now come for the return of the Marbles to their home.

As is noted by Maria Ioannidou, the director of the Acropolis Monuments Maintenance Service, "we must no longer call them the Elgin Marbles but the "Parthenon Marbles" and they must be returned to Greece."

"The Parthenon is not a ruin. It is standing autonomously and for one to see it complete, the Marbles must be returned," she said



My opinion
New Acropolis museum is tha landmark of the landmark.Will house the classical collection of the world heritage,it is a place deserves respects not only as the case of these ancient treasures but as the 21th century with the golden age of the Athenian democracy,a civilazation that gives the examples of the new modern world.The returning of the marbels from British museum will put an end to a sad story,when the antiquites of the monumentswas moved with a barbaric way to London.They are not just scultures,they are pieces of the monuments,there are articrafts of a place of a region,created for a specific light for a specific position.New acropolis museum is their best base ,Attica sun light and view-connections with their home,the Parthenon and the Acropolis monuments,lets put an end to the egoism of the British museum !!!!!The marbels needs imediatelly an act of prevent their last century depressing,New Acropolis museum and they born place sun light will save them for ever!!!!
__________________
WW-II German Reparations
http://www.greece.org/blogs/wwii/?page_id=764

Last edited by ELLIN; October 31st, 2007 at 04:32 AM.
ELLIN no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2007, 11:44 PM   #49
PhilG
Liverpool
 
PhilG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Liverpool
Posts: 884
Likes (Received): 45

I agree totally that the Parthenon Marbles should be returned, this projct is amazing
PhilG no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 27th, 2007, 04:02 AM   #50
Giorgio
Registered User
 
Giorgio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 10,677
Likes (Received): 480

I wait to see the response of the British.
If it is negative, I am sure me and another 50,000 Adelaide Greeks will protest infront of the British consulate.
Giorgio no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2007, 10:32 AM   #51
potiz81
Registered User
 
potiz81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Frankfurt
Posts: 1,309
Likes (Received): 776

An amazing new photo from The New York Times:



and another one from Acropolis:



The reporter says: " Itís impossible to stand in the top-floor galleries, in full view of the Parthenonís ravaged, sun-bleached frame, without craving the marblesí return. "
http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/200...IDESHOW_6.html
potiz81 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2007, 12:02 PM   #52
savas
head up funny boy
 
savas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,571
Likes (Received): 413

Where Gods Yearn for Long-Lost Treasures

NO sane architect, one can assume, would want to invite comparisons between his building and the Parthenon. So it comes as little surprise that the New Acropolis Museum, which stands at the foot of one of the great achievements of human history, is a quiet work, especially by the standards of its flamboyant Swiss-born architect, Bernard Tschumi.

But in mastering his ego, Mr. Tschumi pulled off an impressive accomplishment: a building that is both an enlightening meditation on the Parthenon and a mesmerizing work in its own right. I canít remember seeing a design that is so eloquent about another work of architecture.

....................................................................................
....................................................................................
....................................................................................

I carried these thoughts with me as I boarded an evening flight to London shortly after touring the museum. The next morning I walked from my hotel to the British Museum to visit the Elgin Marbles. Inside the long, narrow Duveen Gallery I felt an immediate twinge of pain. The marbles were stunning, but they looked homesick.

To give visitors some sense of where they were in the Parthenon, the curators have hung the friezes along two facing walls, with the pediments set at each end of the gallery. Even so, you read them as individual works of art, not as part of a composition.

A panel depicting the receding tail of one horse and the advancing head of another with an expanse of blank stone in between is breathtaking. But itís hard to picture how it originally fit into the Parthenon. The lack of context is only reinforced by Lord Elginís decision two centuries ago to cut the works out of the huge blocks of stone into which they were originally carved, a cruel act of vandalism intended to make them easier to ship.

In dismantling the ruins of one of the glories of Western civilization, Lord Elgin robbed them of their meaning.The profound connection of the marbles to the civilization that produced them is lost.

Mr. Tschumiís great accomplishment is to express this truth in architectural form. Without pomp or histrionics, his building makes the argument for the marblesí return.


By New York Times
Published: October 28, 2007

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/28/ar...ewanted=1&_r=2
__________________
Και πρώτα απ'όλα τι εννοούμε λέγοντας παιδεία; Την πληροφορία, την τεχνική, το δίπλωμα εξειδίκευσης που εξασφαλίζει γάμο, αυτοκίνητο κι ακίνητο,
με πληρωμή την πλήρη υποταγή του εξασφαλισθέντος ή την πνευματική και ψυχική διάπλαση ενός ελεύθερου ανθρώπου, με τεχνική αναθεώρησης κι ονειρικής δομής,
με αγωνία απελευθέρωσης και με διαθέσεις μιας ιπτάμενης φυγής προς τ'άστρα; M.X.
savas no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 30th, 2007, 08:28 PM   #53
somataki
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 412
Likes (Received): 0

A world class museum is born!!!!!!! Can't wait to see the Parthenon marbles from London to fill the new museum!












Last edited by somataki; October 31st, 2007 at 01:29 AM.
somataki no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2007, 02:16 AM   #54
potiz81
Registered User
 
potiz81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Frankfurt
Posts: 1,309
Likes (Received): 776

The current metro entrance next to the museum wil be reconstructed from Bernard tschumi to the architecture style of the museum. Today its a simple marble entrance:


image hosted on flickr
potiz81 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 5th, 2007, 07:48 PM   #55
ELLIN
MOLON LAVE
 
ELLIN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Αthens
Posts: 869
Likes (Received): 46

This is the new official site of the New Acropolis Museum,it has many infos and descriptions of the whole structure.
http://www.newacropolismuseum.gr/
__________________
WW-II German Reparations
http://www.greece.org/blogs/wwii/?page_id=764
ELLIN no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 4th, 2007, 12:50 AM   #56
ELLIN
MOLON LAVE
 
ELLIN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Αthens
Posts: 869
Likes (Received): 46

A new and really positive article from Guardian newspaper for the New Acropolis Museum

Acropolis now


It was the biggest prize in architecture - and its creator took on earthquakes, hostile locals and 104 court cases. Jonathan Glancey reports from Athens on a momentous achievement

Monday December 3, 2007
The Guardian


A geometrical marvel ... the New Acropolis Museum. Photograph: Christian Richters



It was a day unlike any other. Bernard Tschumi arrived at his office in New York's Chelsea Village to receive a phone call. This was the big one. The Swiss-American architect had won the greatest prize in architecture: the international competition to design the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. This was a job, surely, coveted by every A-list architect in the world.
No sooner had Tschumi put down the phone than he was told that a plane had just crashed into the World Trade Centre. "We all watched from our roof as the second aircraft smashed into the other tower," he says. "No one felt like celebrating after that. It wasn't a particularly good start.

Tschumi's new museum - a geometrical marvel dedicated to the celebration of antiquity - was funded by Greece's ministry of culture and the EU. The building is complete, though its display of magnificent Athenian art, some 4,000 ancient artefacts in all, won't be finalised until next summer. But this is not just a splendid gallery. From the very beginning, the new building had to engage in an architectural dialogue with the nearby Parthenon, the 5th-century BC temple dedicated to the wise if warlike goddess Athena, the virgin (or "parthenos").
The Parthenon - centrepiece of the Acropolis, the "sacred rock" at the heart of Athens - was commissioned by Pericles, at the height of Greek power, from the architects Ictinus and Callicrates and the sculptor Phidias. The result was a meticulously self-contained and perfectly proportioned marble temple enclosed by 46 fluted Doric columns; it has no wings, no projections, nothing to take away from its perfect form. This creation has long been judged the single most important building in the canon of western civilisation, partly because of the classical values it so perfectly embodies, and partly because its beauty really is hard to match. Classicists have bowed before it, but so did Le Corbusier, the most iconoclastic of modern architects. How can any architect ever match its rhythm and harmony?

Oddly, the building had been all but abandoned when the seventh Earl of Elgin came here to ship many of its famous sculptures to London in 1801, triggering a controversy that has rumbled on for two centuries. It has been a church, a mosque and even a gunpowder store, depending on who held Athens at the time. Partly destroyed by a Venetian mortar in 1687, the Parthenon only really began to matter again politically after the Greeks won their war of independence from Turkey in 1821. Ever since, the Parthenon has been a sacred symbol to Greece.

Naturally, Tschumi wanted to do his best in the shadow of this architectural colossus. Creating something to complement the aesthetic heights of the Acropolis was not, however, his only challenge; the Greek government needed a building grand enough to finally persuade the British government to return the Elgin Marbles from their current home in the British Museum, to a gallery in the new museum.

Things started badly. "There were those who said the building should be in a traditional classical style," says Tschumi. "Then the government changed, and everyone thought the project would be cancelled. Some said the job shouldn't have gone to a foreigner. During construction, there were 104 court cases against the scheme."

No wonder it wasn't ready for the 2004 Athens Olympics. As for the site, it was problematic, too. Not only was it just 300 yards from the hallowed Acropolis, it was also riddled with the archaeological remains of an antique Athenian suburb in mid-excavation. Plus an underground train line ran nearby, threatening noise and vibration. Then there was the 19th-century neo-Greek police academy that occupied a big chunk of the site; a protected building, it had to stay. To create enough room for the new museum, some apartment buildings had to go - by order. Finally, on top of all this, there was the threat of earthquakes.

Something of a poisoned chalice? "No," smiles Tschumi. "I think architects are often at their best when faced with restraints." The biggest restraint was that, given the strictures of the site, it was going to be very hard to design a building that would be both big enough for its purpose and offer great views of the Acropolis. Given the dazzling sun that blasts Athens for much of the year, the ideal view would face north, to avoid glare. Yet the building had to lie east-west.

The solution? Going with the east-west flow for the main part of the building, Tschumi then twisted the rooftop gallery - which is intended for the Elgin Marbles - north. This glorious touch creates a purposefully, rather than gratuitously, dynamic building. It also offers a tremendous view of the entire Acropolis.

This twist aside, the museum's design is calm, even strait-laced. Entirely free of decoration ("The ancient sculpture on display inside will be enough," says Tschumi), the concrete, glass and marble building nevertheless plays a number of clever structural games. The glass-floored entrance lobby, for example, straddles the excavation site so that, as you amble into the museum, you see below you the outlines of shops, alleys, houses, baths and workshops dating back to 600AD. It is like a stroll into antiquity: beneath your feet is street life; high up above is the civic glory of the Acropolis.

From this vantage point, you can also make out the irregular forest of concrete columns the new museum stands on, the antithesis of the beautifully rhythmic spacing of the Parthenon's columns. Each is placed to avoid touching the fabric of the ancient city below. Some are close together, others far apart, and all appear to perform an unlikely engineering waltz. In fact, these columns are doubly clever. They have joints, like giant knees. In times of tremor, the columns will dip and sway - enough, hopefully, to save the building from collapse. "The Greek authorities kept saying our columns didn't comply with local building codes," says Tschumi. "We said, 'But this is what the world's best structural engineers, Arup, recommend.' We studied the building codes. They had last been revised in 1916."

Once over the excavated ancient streets, you reach a generous hall, aglow with slanting sunbeams. The feeling of having arrived somewhere special is inescapable. In front of you, a great ramp slants up to the main galleries, the entrance of which is crowned with the marble pediment of an ancient temple.

There is no sign here of a museum shop, nor the smell of cappuccinos. There is no clutter and few signs, just generous, beautifully lit architectural space, clad in cool marble. Despite so much marble, there is surprisingly little clomp and clatter from visitors' shoes: all the many, mathematically spaced circular holes you see in the walls are there to absorb sound. An entrance lobby designed for at least 3 million visitors a year is never going to be as quiet as a temple, but this is a remarkably calming space.

The first floor holds more surprises. A vast, sunlit and many-columned chamber, it is a pleasure to walk through in its own right; but by next summer, it will be adorned with Greek and Roman-era Athenian sculpture. "I hope the main galleries will be as uninterrupted as possible," says Tschumi. "No ropes to keep visitors away from the sculptures. Minimal captions. No architectural distraction." Eventually, there will be a cafe on the rooftop terrace complete with sunshade, offering splendid views over the rooftops.

Crowning the museum is that skewed top floor, a great glazed box facing north to the Acropolis. The views are picture-perfect, except for those missing marbles, of course. Some of those superb sculptures - of steeds and soldiers, gods and giants - will soon inhabit this gallery, though the majority will remain, as yet, in the British Museum. Intriguingly, this gallery is the same size as the core of the Parthenon, so visitors will get a sense of the scale of the sculptures in relation to the mother temple. In a brazen move, copies of the missing sculptures will be installed, fronted with gauze masks so they look like the ghosts of the plundered objects. As Tschumi says, "A visit to the top floor will be a journey into the world of cultural politics and propaganda, as well as great art."

And a journey into impressive design, too. A glass gallery in the scorching Athenian sun? It sounds like madness. Yet it should all work, coolly and calmly - not just because that north view is glare-free, but also because a double-glazing system channels cool air between the glass panes.

Whether the marbles will ever all return to Athens is a question for curators and politicians. The New Acropolis Museum is certainly ready to receive them. "Orchestrated simplicity" is how Tschumi described his goal. Unpretentious, well-built and wearing its ingenuity lightly, his building is a relaxed walk through layers of ancient Greek art, architecture and city-making. It makes the Parthenon even more important than it has been over the past two centuries, even if some of its marbles, the very reason for the museum's construction, are still missing. But how much does it matter? The Parthenon is 2,500 years old. Perhaps there's no great hurry to put the final touches to Tschumi's handsome building.

GUARDIAN
__________________
WW-II German Reparations
http://www.greece.org/blogs/wwii/?page_id=764
ELLIN no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 5th, 2007, 12:42 AM   #57
potiz81
Registered User
 
potiz81's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Frankfurt
Posts: 1,309
Likes (Received): 776

From flickr:

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
potiz81 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 5th, 2007, 09:50 AM   #58
Cerises
99% Angel
 
Cerises's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Athens-Αθήνα-GR/Southeastern U.S.
Posts: 685
Likes (Received): 371

Can't wait for it to open to the public!
__________________
Dum Spiro Spero
Cerises no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 5th, 2007, 07:39 PM   #59
mikey23
.
 
mikey23's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: London
Posts: 2,266
Likes (Received): 123

This looks amazing, especailly the interior.
__________________
A society grows great when old men plant trees in whose shade they know they shall never sit.
mikey23 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 5th, 2007, 09:24 PM   #60
erbse
LIBERTINED
 
erbse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: McLenBurg
Posts: 43,205
Likes (Received): 57863

What an insult to the Acropolis

Couldn't they have build it slightly farther? It might be okay for modern architecture someway, but that definetly isn't enough to dignify or pay any respect to this location.
__________________
GET FREE!
D W F


🔥 Tradition doesn't mean to look after the ash, but to keep the flame alive! 🔥
erbse no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu