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Old December 3rd, 2012, 07:22 AM   #321
MattiG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I was wondering about that, because even in the Netherlands this time of the year doesn't yield much useful sunshine for highway photography.
On a very cloudy day, it is hard to say if it is the sunrise, the noon or the sunset. On a bright day no problem for photography, and really no problem when there is snow.

The morning and evening twilight is rather long in December in the north. Today, their duration is about 55 minutes in Helsinki:

0805 Civil twilight begins (Sun 6 degrees below horizon)
0901 Sunrise
1210 True noon (Sun altitude 8 degrees)
1519 Sunset
1614 End of civil twilight

To compare the same data in Amsterdam:

0751 Civil twilight begins (Sun 6 degrees below horizon)
0831 Sunrise
1230 True noon (Sun altitude 16 degrees)
1630 Sunset
1710 End of civil twilight
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Old December 3rd, 2012, 07:56 AM   #322
Дмитрий Кудряшо
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OulaL View Post
Thanks for pics, Dmitrij!
Please!

Quote:
Originally Posted by OulaL View Post
Just a grammatical OT note: the actual name for this place is "Husula"; "Husulan" is the genitive case, here "The tunnel of Husula".
Corrected.
I would be grateful for your comments and corrections (and grammar and terminology), English is not my mother tongue (not to mention Finnish) - I translate with Google.Translate.
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Old December 7th, 2012, 04:23 PM   #323
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Road 51 Kivenlahti-Kirkkonummi opens at 2+2

The works to upgrade the most congested approach to Helsinki to a motorway started in 2010. The existing motorway will be extended 10 km to west. The works are planned to complete in late 2013, but the lanes were planned to open by Christmas this year. The heavy snowstorm last week caused some of the remaining work to be postponed, and the whole section was opened 2+2 a week go, a few weeks ahead of the schedule. There will be temporary line closures due to the works, and the road does not yet carry the motorway status.

Three new exits were built, and the exit to the Ring III was slightly upgraded.



The east end of the upgraded section. Tall noise barriers.



Descent to the Jorvas valley. The valley is deep mud, and the road is built like a bridge: Concrete superstructure supported by hundreds of poles of 15-20 metres tall.



Noise barrier wall at the west end.



Lane closure due to installing the middle barrier.



Misplaced sign. The figures are in error by 3 kilometres.



The diamond shaped ramps are all connected to the secondary road via a roundabout. This is quite an effective way to prevent wrong way driving.



The route over roads 25-51-50/E18-7/E18 is popular trade route from the port of Hanko to Russia. That is why St Petersburg is visible on a few signs.



The eastbound ramp of exit 16 towards Helsinki. A massive rock cutting.



Lateral roads have been built for local access and for non-motorway traffic.
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Old December 7th, 2012, 09:59 PM   #324
Дмитрий Кудряшо
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November 25, 2012
It's here.

Construction of the bridge over the Kymi and discharge channel hydroelectric Ahvenkoski. A view of the west:
image hosted on flickr


Markkinamäki larger:
image hosted on flickr


Temporary bridge built for the construction of a permanent bridge right direction (from Helsinki to Vaalimaa).
A view of the west, in the direction of Helsinki:
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Concreted bridge spans the left direction (from Helsinki to Vaalimaa).
A view of the west, in the direction of Helsinki:
image hosted on flickr


After the bridge will begin tunnel Markkinamäki (east portal).
A view of the west, in the direction of Helsinki:
image hosted on flickr


Formwork pillars bridge:
image hosted on flickr


Construction of a bridge over the mainstream Kymijoki.
View to the east, in the direction of Vaalimaa:
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


To the east of Kymijoki:
View to the east, in the direction of Vaalimaa:
image hosted on flickr


Bonus: panorama hydroelectric Ahvenkoski.
View from the bridge on the highway 7 north:
image hosted on flickr


These (and other) photos in higher resolution can be found in the album:
Реконструкция Е 18, Ahvenkoski.

P.S. If you see inaccuracies, typos and errors - do not hesitate, please let me know.
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Old December 13th, 2012, 10:13 AM   #325
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You better watch out

Map over 'moose' accidents in Finland

http://files.snstatic.fi/IS/2012/11/...rit/index.html
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Old December 13th, 2012, 12:33 PM   #326
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kosimodo View Post
You better watch out

Map over 'moose' accidents in Finland

http://files.snstatic.fi/IS/2012/11/...rit/index.html
That map shows the statistics over the years 2007-2011, and covers accidents related to mooses and deer. About 30% of the annual 4000 accidents are moose-related (dangerous, 3-5 fatalities annually, 100+ injuries) and the remaining ones deer-related (less dangerous, usually no fatalities, 20+ injuries).

The accident density is highest in the southwest because the deer population and traffic density is highest there.

(If you zoom the map and click the red dots: 'Peuraonnettomuus' = deer accicent, 'Hirvionnettomuus' = moose accident)

As you can see, the animal fences protecting most motorways are rather effective in preventing the collisions from happening.
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Old December 14th, 2012, 09:29 AM   #327
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Slightly offtopic, but...

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattiG View Post
In some bilingual areas, such as Ireland and the gaelic-speaking part of the UK, the languages are clearly distinguished from each other by fonts or colors. There's a point that can be seen here.

Kirkkonummi is a bilingual municipality and almost all places there have a Finnish and a Swedish name, as seen from the rest of the photos. Coincidentally, here are three places with only one name each. Hirsala, Långvik and Jorvas are three separate destinations, but could a visitor tell from this sign? As seen from Heikkilä/Hindersby, the names don't need to look alike. To a visitor, Långvik could as well be the Swedish name for Hirsala. Or if a person isn't familiar with the letter "å" or Finnish and Swedish languages in general, Långvik could also be the Finnish name for Jorvas.

Last edited by OulaL; December 14th, 2012 at 09:37 AM.
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Old December 14th, 2012, 10:15 AM   #328
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Sorry for "ignoring" that rather interesting remark (don't have an opinion about it), but I have a question: Somewhere I heard/read that Finland has some heated roads and when I was driving from Vaasa to Oulu to Rovaniemi I noticed that there was absolutely 0 snow on the road the closer you get to Rovaniemi as opposed to regular cleared road before and around Oulu.
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Old December 14th, 2012, 10:56 AM   #329
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OulaL View Post
Slightly offtopic, but...

In some bilingual areas, such as Ireland and the gaelic-speaking part of the UK, the languages are clearly distinguished from each other by fonts or colors. There's a point that can be seen here.

Kirkkonummi is a bilingual municipality and almost all places there have a Finnish and a Swedish name, as seen from the rest of the photos. Coincidentally, here are three places with only one name each. Hirsala, Långvik and Jorvas are three separate destinations, but could a visitor tell from this sign? As seen from Heikkilä/Hindersby, the names don't need to look alike. To a visitor, Långvik could as well be the Swedish name for Hirsala. Or if a person isn't familiar with the letter "å" or Finnish and Swedish languages in general, Långvik could also be the Finnish name for Jorvas.
This ambiguity is (partially) handled by spacing. Here is an example of an advance direction sign displaying four destinations, two bilingual and two unilingual ones. Note the different spacing between the destinations, and the language versions:



At the exit sign, each of the destinations is shown in a separate field:



Of course, there still is a ambiguity if the advance sign displays two names. The spacing rule still applies, and it is quite easy to learn to distinguish if the names refer to one ot two destinations.
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Old December 14th, 2012, 11:24 AM   #330
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wover View Post
Sorry for "ignoring" that rather interesting remark (don't have an opinion about it), but I have a question: Somewhere I heard/read that Finland has some heated roads and when I was driving from Vaasa to Oulu to Rovaniemi I noticed that there was absolutely 0 snow on the road the closer you get to Rovaniemi as opposed to regular cleared road before and around Oulu.
There are a really small number of heated streets and pavements in the cities. No heated roads, as far as I know.

The busiest main roads are kept free of show and ice by salting. Typically, salt is added just before the snowfall in order to prevent the snow from cumulating. Of course, if the weather conditions are challenging, the roads cannot be kept clean.

The roads are divided into six categories (Is, I, Ib, TIb, II, and III) in terms of the winter maintenance. The guidelines with pictures are shown on the page http://portal.liikennevirasto.fi/siv...lvihoitoluokat (in Finnish only). The classification of the main road network is visible on the page http://portal.liikennevirasto.fi/por...40B40A1A015B13

The pictures of the newly-opened road 51 were taken at a snowfall. That is why the road surface was not clean even if the road belongs to the Is class.
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Old December 16th, 2012, 12:42 PM   #331
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The Finnish motorway turns 50 years today. On December 16, 1962, the first motorway of Finland opened to traffic, linking Helsinki with Espoo (Valtatie 1). It was 14 kilometers long.

I'm sure MattiG can tell us more about it
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Old December 16th, 2012, 04:09 PM   #332
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Дмитрий Кудряшо View Post
Formwork pillars bridge:
image hosted on flickr

I like the wooden forms they use in Finland. But I wonder if it is really cost effective. On one hand they have of course plenty of wood available but production of such forms must be more labor intensive than when using modern ready forms. Wages in Finland are high so how does it make sense financially?
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Old December 16th, 2012, 04:19 PM   #333
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The Finnish motorway turns 50 years today. On December 16, 1962, the first motorway of Finland opened to traffic, linking Helsinki with Espoo (Valtatie 1). It was 14 kilometers long.

I'm sure MattiG can tell us more about it

Actually, the first motorway-like road, then called "Eastern motorway" was opened earlier; it's the actual Road 170, and carried the National roads 6 and 7 before the opening of Porvoo motorway in 1972.

Kulosaari bridge was completed in 1957 and the whole route until what we know now as Itäkeskus as 2x3-laned in 1962. I wish MattiG could tell more of this, because information is rarely available
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Old December 16th, 2012, 11:16 PM   #334
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RV View Post
Actually, the first motorway-like road, then called "Eastern motorway" was opened earlier; it's the actual Road 170, and carried the National roads 6 and 7 before the opening of Porvoo motorway in 1972.

Kulosaari bridge was completed in 1957 and the whole route until what we know now as Itäkeskus as 2x3-laned in 1962. I wish MattiG could tell more of this, because information is rarely available
Well...

We have to very careful on the terminology now.

Yes, there were a road with the official name Itäinen Moottoritie, to be translated as "Eastern Motorway", as RV tells. However, in that time, there was no official definition of the term "motorway". Thus, the "Motorway" was the name of that road only, and it did not refer to any official road class.

The road class "motorway", and the respective traffic rules, were added into the Finnish legislation effective Jan 1st, 1965.

By 1965, Itäinen Moottoritie was a rather short 2+2 road (about 2.5 kilometres extending to the east end of the island of Kulosaari). There were plans to extend it to the east by upgrading the existing 1+1 road, but those plans became true later. In 1967, the road was renamed to Itäväylä (about "Eastern Artery"). That was done because the name was misleading, and all seven main radial roads into Helsinki got the suffix "väylä".

The road does not meet the motorway standards, and it never achieved an official status of a motorway, despite of its name.

The initial alignment of the roads 6/7 was made via Viikki (blue line):



After the Kulosaari new bridge and the Itäinen Moottoritie were complete, they became the new route (red). Later, the the plans to extend that road to the east as a motorway we canceled. Instead, the motorway got a new alignment somewhat more north (green). In the 1970's the number 6 was dropped, and the road 6 now branches from the road 7 in Koskenkylä about 70 east of Helsinki. The old highway got the number 170.
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Old December 16th, 2012, 11:42 PM   #335
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The Finnish motorway turns 50 years today. On December 16, 1962, the first motorway of Finland opened to traffic, linking Helsinki with Espoo (Valtatie 1). It was 14 kilometers long.

I'm sure MattiG can tell us more about it.
Sure. The history of that road construction exercise is rather well documented.

The construction took six years. Initially, the much of work was done as an unemployment support without proper machinery. During the project, the World Bank was successful to convince Finland that the main purpose of building roads is to get the roads complete, not to employ people.

The road was planned according to the American standards, which was a completely new approach. Several young engineers were sent to the US to learn road design, and the result was ultramodern at that time.

The new road 1 between the cities of Helsinki and Turku was completed in 1941. In 1944, the road 51 from Helsinki to Hanko was cut because the Soviet Union acquired the Porkkala area, and main replacement road was the road 1. In the same time, the big shift from the agricultural Finland to the industrialized Finland begun. Helsinki begun expanding, and road 1 was rather severely congested. Those were the main reasons to begin constructing the first real motorway. (Even if the Soviet Union returned the Porkkala area prematurely in 1956, the road modernization focus remained elsewhere, and the new modern road 51 was completed no earlier than in 1970's.)

The initial stretch from Helsinki to Gumböle in Espoo was mostly a rural 2+2 motorway with three exits (the current exits 40, 43, and 45). None of those exits currently are in their original shape, and three new exits have been built later. Today, the stretch is more like an urban motorway with high exit density, bus lanes, and being congested.

The motorway was later extended in the both ends of the road 1, and the final gap of 51 kilometres was closed no earlier than in 2009.
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Old December 16th, 2012, 11:55 PM   #336
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geogregor View Post
I like the wooden forms they use in Finland. But I wonder if it is really cost effective. On one hand they have of course plenty of wood available but production of such forms must be more labor intensive than when using modern ready forms. Wages in Finland are high so how does it make sense financially?
They are rather cost-effective. Every bridge is unique, and not much added-value would result from making the forms in a more industrialized manner. The form creation is a very visible task at the bridge construction, but it represents rather a small part of the total cost.
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Old December 17th, 2012, 04:14 PM   #337
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E18 Koskenkylä - Kotka

Construction of the new motorway.

image hosted on flickr

Ahvenkosken eritasoliittymä 25.10.12 by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Ahvenkosken sillat 25.10.12 (2) by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

C) Koskenkylä–Loviisa 25.10.12 by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Heinlahden eritasoliittymä 25.10.12 by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

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Heinlahden eritasoliittymä 25.10.12 (2) by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

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Loviisan itäinen eritasoliittymä 25.10.12 by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

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Loviisan itäinen liittymä 25.10.12 by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

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Loviisan läntinen eritasoliittymä 25.10.12 (2) by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Markkinamäentunnelin länsipää 25.10.12 by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

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Pyhtään eritasoliittymä 25.10.12 by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

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Siltakylän eritasoliittymä 25.10.12 by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr

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Sutelan eritasoliittymä 25.10.12 by Liikennevirasto, on Flickr
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Old December 17th, 2012, 04:43 PM   #338
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattiG View Post
Well...

We have to very careful on the terminology now.

Yes, there were a road with the official name Itäinen Moottoritie, to be translated as "Eastern Motorway", as RV tells. However, in that time, there was no official definition of the term "motorway". Thus, the "Motorway" was the name of that road only, and it did not refer to any official road class.

The road class "motorway", and the respective traffic rules, were added into the Finnish legislation effective Jan 1st, 1965.

By 1965, Itäinen Moottoritie was a rather short 2+2 road (about 2.5 kilometres extending to the east end of the island of Kulosaari). There were plans to extend it to the east by upgrading the existing 1+1 road, but those plans became true later. In 1967, the road was renamed to Itäväylä (about "Eastern Artery"). That was done because the name was misleading, and all seven main radial roads into Helsinki got the suffix "väylä".

The road does not meet the motorway standards, and it never achieved an official status of a motorway, despite of its name.

The initial alignment of the roads 6/7 was made via Viikki (blue line):



After the Kulosaari new bridge and the Itäinen Moottoritie were complete, they became the new route (red). Later, the the plans to extend that road to the east as a motorway we canceled. Instead, the motorway got a new alignment somewhat more north (green). In the 1970's the number 6 was dropped, and the road 6 now branches from the road 7 in Koskenkylä about 70 east of Helsinki. The old highway got the number 170.
Do you happen to know when did Viikki interchange opened? It seems like it was a motorway planned towards northeast, because the interchange is really massive for its actual traffic volumes, though in the future a Viikki-Kehä I-tunnel will be constructed.
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Old December 17th, 2012, 05:22 PM   #339
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Do you happen to know when did Viikki interchange opened? It seems like it was a motorway planned towards northeast, because the interchange is really massive for its actual traffic volumes, though in the future a Viikki-Kehä I-tunnel will be constructed.
The decision to begin to plan the upgrade NE from Herttoniemi was made in 1967. I think that interchange was complete rather soon after that, in the early 1970's. I have to dig into my heap of old maps to look if I can find some more accurate data. The left exits of that interchange are among those reasons the road does not meet the Finnish motorway qualifications.
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Old December 18th, 2012, 12:13 AM   #340
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Originally Posted by MattiG View Post
The decision to begin to plan the upgrade NE from Herttoniemi was made in 1967. I think that interchange was complete rather soon after that, in the early 1970's. I have to dig into my heap of old maps to look if I can find some more accurate data. The left exits of that interchange are among those reasons the road does not meet the Finnish motorway qualifications.
After reading a few Annual Reports of City of Helsinki from 1968-1972, it seems to me that the decision to build the Viikintie junction was made somewhat earlier. The report from 1968 tells that the work begun in 1966, and all the nine bridges were complete in 1968. Thus, the junction most probably was completed in late 1968 or in 1969.

According to those Pickwick Papers, the junction planned at the intersection of Itäväylä and the coming Ring I was postponed until 1974 or 1975 due to financial reasons. The junction still does not exist. It is again in a planning phase, and the plans have faced heavy criticism.



The planning for the new alignment of the motorway to the east was ongoing in the same time. The planning authority was not City of Helsinki, but the then state Road Agency. Traces about the detail planning phase are visible in the annual reports from 1970 and 1971. The state and the city were negotiating certain cost elements and action points.

The road map 1:200000 (GT 3) from the year 1976 shows that the new motorway was open up to east of the Hangelby exit (currently #57). The map from 1980 shows the road being a motorway up to the Harabacka exit #60 west of Porvoo, and as a 1+1 road up to the Rita exit #62 east of Porvoo. The map from 1984 shows the motorway being complete up to Rita.

The map from 1980 shows interesting information:



At that time the state Road Agency introduced the motorway numbering concept: The newly built motorways did not get numbered as main roads 4/5 and 6/7, but M4 and M7. The M7 was printed on the map, but the northbound motorway to become M4 still carries the temporary number 990. The old lousy 1+1 roads retained their numbers.

That concept did not fly a long time. In the map from 1977 it does not exist, and the map from 1984 does not show it any more. In the 1984, the current numbering scheme (with the exception of E roads) was in place: the motorways carry the numbers 4 and 7, and the old roads numbers 140 and 170 respectively.
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