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Old July 1st, 2008, 06:48 AM   #101
Alex Von Königsberg
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I think that having an expressway running through the city will not necessarily be a bad thing. However, just like you mentioned, it should be planned as to cause as little change in city landscape as possible. For instance, I really like how they have done it in Madrid. Running expressways through the tunnels is the best option and it makes it look somewhat futuristic, but it is pricey, of course. I notice that the worst option is to elevate an expressway over the city, and the best example of what I know would be Sacramento. When a motorway is neither buried nor elevated, it is still not the worst option.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 06:59 AM   #102
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i think that its a great idea as long as its not going to cause a lot of problems. Living in Washington DC, i have to deal with the fact that I-95 does not go through the city, instead is goes around the cirty by following the Capital Beltway. There were plans to build I-95 through the city, and the road they built to do it exists now as I-395, but it ends near the Capitol (it actually almost runs underneath it). The plans would have worked as a large portion of the road would have been underground. I guess it would have been cool to have a series of freeways running through the center of the city like in LA or Houston or any other city that has it but the central business district in DC is right next to the National Mall and all the government buildings so it could never happen. Based on the amount of business DC has attracted over the years major highways would would have been a good ieda if they were feasible. I wish so much that they had just built 95 the whole way through the city, but there was too much opposition. Theres no way that they could have predicted that DC would have the third worst traffic in the country 40 years ago. If it had been built, things would be soooo much better here.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 07:01 AM   #103
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Cities have suffered from traffic congestion due to incomplete execution of their freeway plans but the problem is that when certain freeways were scrapped, the freeway plans were not modified. Instead of focusing on rail transport to accomodate traffic, cities remained autocentric and forced commuters to file into single high volume arteries.

A good example of changing transport plans in the wake of freeway revolts was in Toronto, which put a subway line in the corridor of a proposed freeway, thus allowing that corridor to still serve as a means of transporting people.

Furthermore, city planners relied too extensively on inner-city routes to transport traffic and completely ignored mass transit.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 09:37 AM   #104
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I personally think freeways don't belong in historic city centers. However, some countries, like Spain are doing a good job build aesthetic freeways through their cities without becoming massive. 10 lane freeways are usually plain ugly, especially with no green median and made of concrete, but there are almost none of them in Europe, but more of them in the United States. However, most U.S. cities don't really have an historic city center.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 12:06 PM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by en1044 View Post
i think that its a great idea as long as its not going to cause a lot of problems. Living in Washington DC, i have to deal with the fact that I-95 does not go through the city, instead is goes around the cirty by following the Capital Beltway. There were plans to build I-95 through the city, and the road they built to do it exists now as I-395, but it ends near the Capitol (it actually almost runs underneath it). The plans would have worked as a large portion of the road would have been underground. I guess it would have been cool to have a series of freeways running through the center of the city like in LA or Houston or any other city that has it but the central business district in DC is right next to the National Mall and all the government buildings so it could never happen. Based on the amount of business DC has attracted over the years major highways would would have been a good ieda if they were feasible. I wish so much that they had just built 95 the whole way through the city, but there was too much opposition. Theres no way that they could have predicted that DC would have the third worst traffic in the country 40 years ago. If it had been built, things would be soooo much better here.
You think you have problems!Sofia with a population approximately
2 million people doesn't have a multilane ringroad and there is a urban "highway" that goes only to the center and ends with a traffic light in the middle of the city with no plans for extensionYou can think what is the traffic during the rush hour
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Old July 1st, 2008, 06:59 PM   #106
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Wow, considering the PC views of highways through cities, I thought I would have been burned at the stake for my opinions . Even though I tried to express ideas as liberal as possible.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 07:14 PM   #107
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double post.
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Old July 1st, 2008, 11:17 PM   #108
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Cities are better off without most of their proposed urban motorways. However, grade-separated ring roads to keep through traffic out of city centres could prevent more harm than they do. There is definite answer to that question.
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Last edited by flierfy; July 1st, 2008 at 11:18 PM. Reason: erasing errors
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Old July 1st, 2008, 11:21 PM   #109
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I actually like those tunnels underneath intersections they have in Brussels. It ensures a better flow without the need of widening roads to huge boulevards which are virtually unpassable.
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Old July 6th, 2008, 07:04 AM   #110
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nice thread love looking at roads and abandoned infrastructure
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Old July 6th, 2008, 11:39 AM   #111
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Let's take a look at East Saint Louis, Illinois. The city lost twothirds of it's population since the 1960's. There is a phenomenon known as "urban prairie", where lots and city blocks are abandoned, and eventually demolished, giving (nearly) empty lots across the city. There is also some abandoned infrastructure.

At this picture, the I-55/I-64/I-70 overlap runs through the upper section.
[IMG]http://i30.************/rwl4s9.jpg[/IMG]
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Old July 6th, 2008, 06:09 PM   #112
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Looks like a possible future for the american suburb
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Old July 6th, 2008, 06:31 PM   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HiRazor View Post
Ok, let this thread be a place to post the information on abandoned highways and highway structures worldwide.

Kick off:

Abandoned highway bridges near Borovsko, Czech republic


looking at the beautiful surrounding area of that forrest, i take great pleasure that these road works never got completed. if they did these beautiful forests and the ecosystem that thrives in it would have been severy punished by noise and exzauts pollution. Hope it stays that way, dont want the roads to be complted projects and become operational
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Old July 6th, 2008, 07:22 PM   #114
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There are two stub interchanges at the E35 Expressway (Guthrie Corridor Expressway) in Malaysia - Bukit Lagong Interchange and Elmina Interchange. Right now the Elmina interchange is only used as a U-turn to go back to Shah Alam.
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Old September 13th, 2008, 06:00 AM   #115
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I-84 and Hartford, Ct Area Freeway Stubs

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Originally Posted by 10ROT View Post
Hartford's proposed network in the 1960s




Hartford's highway network as of 2007 (new highways are doubtful)



I'll get in more detail later when I get to a computer with Google Earth, so I can show the details of the highways that were construction and then were cancelled.

And there's a lot of them.
Time to actually show some of these(and yes, there are a lot).
Traveling in a generally west-east direction:

Ct 7 is a road that is in the process of being upgraded to expressway. Currently it starts in the south at a junction with I-95, goes north past Ct 15 (Merritt Parkway) and then stops.

Ct 7 continues north as a surface road until south of I-84, which it multiplexes with.

North of I-84, Ct 7 branches off again until it stops.


Ct 25 is also incomplete. This is the stub where it was supposed to multiplex with I-84.

This is the current northern end of the expressway portion of Ct 25.


Ct 8 actually is more or less complete. Its northern end is a stub that was intended to extend into Massachusetts where it would be their problem.

When Ct 8 was upgraded to freeway, some of the old near freeway- grade sections got turned into stubs, like here in Beacon Falls.


Heading east toward Hartford on I-84, we find a stub that was intended to be a part of the Ct 10 freeway.


Further north is the intended sight of the Ct 10/72 interchange.

Ct 72 itself ends a few miles west, but is being extended as marked.

This stub used to be part of Ct 72. The highway on the right is Ct 9.


Further north/east on I-84 is the stub intended for Ct 4.


Next on I-84 is a rather dashing 4 level interchange that is only half used. It was intended for I-291, the beltway for Hartford, and the southern half is currently used by Ct 9.

Farther south on the I-291 ROW, Ct 9 leaves the ROW. Orange is the I-291 ROW and blue is the ROW for Ct 71.

Here is where the interchange with I-291 and I-91 would have been.

The ROW has become a bit built up so I marked it in red.

The next stub on the map is marked as Ct 501.


Next on I-84 are the northern and southern stubs planned for Ct 189

(Note the ramps that stop mid-air)

The southern ramps are marked on the map as Ct 504.


This loop was supposed to be part of Ct 9 and run into Ct 189.


An isolated rural section of Ct 189 was also completed.


In downtown Hartford, I-484, a (very small) loop was planned and partly built.


North of Hartford, part of the I-291 beltway was completed, with stubs for extension westward and around Hartford to the 4 level stack on I-84.


Further north, here's where Ct 20 would have continued west.


East of Hartford Ct 5 and I-84 are thrown together in a mixmaster style interchange, but an extra set of ramps emerge from the mess. This stub was intended for US 5.

Further north there is another stub for US 5.


Further north a section of Ct 190(east-west) was upgraded to freeway standard around I-91.


Ct 17 has 2 freeway stubs; one off of Ct 2...

and one off of Ct 9.


I-384 was intended to go from Hartford to Providence as I-84, but stops considerably short.

Farther east another section was completed, but doesn't connect to any other highways.



Still farther east, another section was built as stubs from I-395.


Ct 11 was planned to go from Ct 2 to I-95, but stops halfway. This has a decent chance of getting completed because the locals support its completion.

New Haven area stubs will be in my next post.

Last edited by scalziand; September 13th, 2008 at 06:21 AM. Reason: MOAR stubs
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Old September 13th, 2008, 10:22 PM   #116
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New Haven, CT area stubs

Many blocks of houses were cleared for Ct 34, but only a short section was completed.


Stub that was intended to be part of a ringroad around New Haven.


Stubs for the East Rock connector.


Ct 80 was supposed to be another part of the ring road.


Ct 40 was intended to connect the planned Ct 10 highway with I-95.


These stubs were planned as part of Ct 42.
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Old September 13th, 2008, 11:05 PM   #117
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Connecticut seems like the capital of freeway stubs. Perhaps due to the Freeway Revolts in the late 60's/70's. Many projects throughout the US were cancelled by then. However, suburbanization didn't stop, so nowadays, more or less whole Connecticut exists out of low-density urbanized area, increasing pressure at the aged and low-level-of-service expressways in the region.
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Old September 14th, 2008, 01:59 PM   #118
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Another short motorway (Tangenziale di Varese): http://maps.google.it/maps?f=q&hl=it...38452&t=h&z=15

Uncompleted motorway exit: http://maps.google.it/maps?f=q&hl=it...=18&iwloc=addr
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Old September 14th, 2008, 05:33 PM   #119
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There are very short motorways, but also short holes in existing network.

Here an example: between A27 and A28 in northern Italy there is a hole of only 4 km, entirely on flat land, that will be completed in 2010.

http://maps.google.it/maps?f=q&hl=it...53809&t=h&z=13
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Old September 15th, 2008, 03:07 AM   #120
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Klagenfurt

An example of an unfinished, as well as partly demolished (or rather reorganized) motorway, is the former A2 in Klagenfurt (Austria), its local part, between the main part of the A2 by junction Klagenfurt West and the city of Klagenfurt (August Jaksch Straße).



At first it was planned that the main east-west motorway would run almost through the city-center, but as the local population was against it, it was later decided that the motorway would be built north of the city, thus leaving the already constructed motorway in the west of Klagenfurt to serve local traffic. As AADT was only about 10,000 in the last years when the northern bypass was already open, last year they reduced it to only 2 lanes, with the other 2 lanes serving as parking spaces. Too bad; I wouldn't say if the AADT was just 1,000 or so, but 10,000 is enough for motorway IMO, especially when it's already built. Of course no one uses parking spaces several kilometers out of the city, so now they are thinking of another reorganization of the road, but it should stay 2-laned.
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