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Old January 15th, 2014, 08:59 AM   #1201
Dynamoe
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Madiba memorial mural

Posted 13th January 2014 • By Design Indaba • Topic Art & Photography • Category Design Snippets in News

Cape Town-based street artist Freddy Sam has unveiled a ten-storey tall mural of Madiba in the inner city of Johannesburg.













Street artist Ricky Lee Gordon, aka Freddy Sam, was invited by the Maboneng precinct in the east city of Johannesburg to paint a 10 storey-tall Nelson Mandela mural as a gift to the city in memory of this giant of a man.
The 'I am because we are' Madiba tribute mural is inspired by the statesman's definition of the African concept of Ubuntu: “You cannot be human all by yourself”.
He decided to paint the iconic image of Madiba boxing on a city rooftop. “He (Mandela) believed all were equal in the ring. Also this wall is not to far from the rooftop where this image was taken, Freddy Sam explains. “I was so honored when permission was granted to me to paint the mural using the original photo taken by Bob Gosani.”
The painting commenced shortly after Madiba’s passing and took approximate four days. Due to weather and technical difficulties the final completion was delayed until early in 2014.
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Old January 17th, 2014, 02:25 PM   #1202
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Another good news is that the notorious multi-level parkade opposite the Bree Taxi ranks
is being demolished. That was such an eye sore and harbored criminal elements. Wonder what is going to replace it though.
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Old January 19th, 2014, 03:48 PM   #1203
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Took a walk down Main Street!
Once again, I was totally amazed at your amzing city. Some parts even looked as good as Cape Town. So Josters! Appreciate your city!

And apologies for the dark and somewhat blurry quality. Was taken using my phone. But I feel there are many out there who are unaware of the streetscape within Inner City Johannesburg (I was one of them) , hence my sharing. There definately needs to be more exposure!



















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Old January 19th, 2014, 04:36 PM   #1204
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kulani View Post
Another good news is that the notorious multi-level parkade opposite the Bree Taxi ranks
is being demolished. That was such an eye sore and harbored criminal elements. Wonder what is going to replace it though.
I'm glad it has been removed. I have heard that it was a common place for thugs who would rob people on the Nelson Mandela bridge would hide out!
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Old January 20th, 2014, 05:15 AM   #1205
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Very old article but explains the parking garage close to the Bree Street Taxi Rank.

Brave new Joburg: Operation Clean Sweep II

24 November 2013
City Press




The City of Johannesburg is preparing for the second leg of Operation Clean Sweep that extends far beyond street traders to target the inner city’s so-called bad buildings, land invaders and shack dwellers.

Demolition gets under way near the Bree Street taxi rank in downtown Joburg as a result of the area being declared a health hazard. Now the City of Johannesburg is determined to develop the area.

The city is proposing the creation of a whole new class of officials who can declare any “building … public road, park, private road or any piece of land of whatever nature” a “problem property”.
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Old January 21st, 2014, 04:11 PM   #1206
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Too classy to be bothered with Jo'burg's poor

17 Jan 2014 00:00
Zeenat Sujee, Keamogetswe Thobakgale

As parts of Johannesburg's inner city are being "revived", this revival is being conducted at the expense of the poor and marginalised in the city.

Most of the people who are being evicted in the inner-city area are security guards, cleaners, nannies and domestic workers.

Nomsa, who was born and raised in a rural village in the Eastern Cape, decided to move to Johannesburg for employment opportunities after the advent of democracy.

She did not have accommodation but called on a m'khaya (friend from home) who was living in the inner city.

Nomsa's m'khaya informed her of a building in the inner city where rent was R480. About 120 other people, including the elderly and children, were living there.

She moved in and began a new life, working and enjoying some independence. A few years later the person to whom she was paying rent disappeared and all the occupants received an eviction notice.

At the time, Nomsa had two children to support by doing piece jobs, for which she earned about R800 a month. What was she to do if she was evicted?

The city's development agenda focuses on large-scale infrastructure and "cleaning up" in the inner city. Many derelict buildings, long abandoned by their owners, are now earmarked for restoration and development.

But there is a problem: people live in these buildings and call them home. Families, children, workers – people – have lived in many of these buildings for long periods, from several years to well over 10 years. Parts of the inner city are being "revived", but this revival is being conducted at the expense of the poor and marginalised.

As human rights lawyers, we fight battles against eviction in court and lead parallel processes by having conversations with business people and property owners. In such conversations, the perceptions often articulated are that poor people in South Africa have a culture of entitlement, that they seek to hold on to free housing and that they are dependent on social welfare. This is incorrect.

Many people relocate to urban areas looking for opportunities, as was the case for Nomsa who relocated from a province that has many challenges in terms of employment and of accessing basic services and amenities.

Acting in the best interests of her family, Nomsa sought a better life. When she relocated to a dilapidated building in the inner city, she paid rent in good faith to a person whom she understood to be the owner.

Many people would be sympathetic to the position of legitimate owners when they wished to evict occupants from whom they derived no income, particularly if such evictions would be the first stage in a process of refurbishing a building.

However, Nomsa and the other occupants should not be construed only as a burden to a property owner.

Their situation is evidence that there are many people who need better living conditions, which include access to healthcare, schools and other facilities that are inaccessible in other areas of the country.

There is a need for state intervention to alleviate the burden on the private owner.

Alternatively, ways of achieving economic growth without disregarding people's rights must be explored.

In many of the communities with which we partner, or those that we represent, there are people who wake up each morning to go to work, but are paid an amount that is less than the monthly cost of living in the inner city. Living outside the city centre means incurring transport costs that drain even more of their monthly income.

Accommodation in Johannesburg starts from between R600 and R1 000 a month for social housing – for people who earn between R3 000 and R7 000 – and R2 350 to R4 000 for privately owned flats.

By contrast, a two-bedroom townhouse in the northern suburbs can cost about R12 000 a month.

Most of the people who are being evicted in the inner-city area are security guards, cleaners, nannies and domestic workers.

The average monthly household income in one of the communities we represent in this area is R550.

Those who are not formally employed survive on informal trade, such as washing cars, part-time domestic work and the sale of recyclable material.

We advocate for fair eviction processes and state compliance with its constitutional obligations to protect the rights of individuals to have access to adequate housing. But beyond the rule of law, in the new constitutional dispensation there ought to be a fight for fairness for disadvantaged people and the circumstances that they confront on a daily basis.

As much as we understand that one right in our democratic Constitution is not preferred over another, certain rights must be interpreted contextually – with due consideration for people's social and economic circumstances. Access to housing is one of them.

To return to Nomsa, her right to housing is not the only one affected by the eviction notice. The fact that she does not have access to adequate shelter infringes her right to privacy, safety and equality.

Nomsa's right to dignity and the best interests of her children are also affected.

These additional factors have to be considered by a court of law when adjudicating on these matters.

At this point, the city needs to implement court orders to provide temporary alternative accommodation and to revaluate its housing strategies to realise the rights of the poor, marginalised and vulnerable members of society.

It has been argued by many people that the law is one-sided and subjects a property owner to undue hardship during an eviction process.

The Constitution and the legislation pertaining to eviction processes seek to protect both the landowner and the person facing eviction.

The law requires very specific steps to be taken before a valid eviction order may be implemented.

One of these steps is that there must be temporary alternative accommodation for those who are to be evicted.

In December of 2011, the Centre for Applied Legal Studies successfully obtained an order from the Constitutional Court that a municipality must have a plan for temporary alternative accommodation, irrespective of who owns the building, before eviction may take place.

The rationale is that the right to housing is balanced against the right to property.

People who are evicted and would otherwise be rendered homeless must have a place to stay.

It is sad to note that the challenges confronting our society relating to inadequate housing affect all races regardless of gender or age but have mainly had an adverse effect on black people.

For women, the housing crisis impedes the rights to family life and to the safety and privacy of a permanent home because the community set-up poses a threat of sexual violence against women.

Nomsa's story is similar to that of people who lived in a building near the Arts on Main precinct.

Although the residents were paying rent to a purported owner, the real owner instituted eviction proceedings.

The evictions took place on a weekend at 3am just before Christmas in 2012.

After the eviction, the families were forced to take shelter under the bridge opposite the precinct – they could not afford rent anywhere else and their "formal employment", informal trade and piece jobs were in and around the Johannesburg area.

One woman went into labour and gave birth to a baby girl. After returning from hospital, the mother and child continued to live under the bridge.

After about seven weeks, the community members were forced to relocate without consultation. Their stay under the bridge affected businesses in the area and this is probably what forced the city to act.

The process of their removal from under the bridge showed how much emphasis was placed on their removal as opposed to where they would be placed. Currently, they live at a shelter.

We believe that enhancing the economy and creating a "vibrant city" is possible without sacrificing the economic opportunities for indigent South Africans.

Therefore, as the state, private business and people passionately continue to create a growing economy and a vibrant "world-class African city", we should pause for a moment and think of Nomsa, her children and many more families living in downtown Johannesburg who may be driven further into poverty by the profits inherent in this process.

Zeenat Sujee is a senior attorney in the basic services programme at the Centre for Applied Legal Studies. Keamogetswe Thobakgale is a candidate attorney at the centre and will be a clerk at the Constitutional Court from June.

http://mg.co.za/article/2014-01-16-t...-with-the-poor
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Old January 21st, 2014, 07:31 PM   #1207
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Ah! Other side of the coin! Its the age old gentrification/urban regeneration debate about the economic dislocation of individuals.

I feel that the situation in Johannesburg is very unique. Yes, there are poor and marginalised individuals living in inner city Johannesburg, however, some of these people reside in "highjacked" or degraded and uncontrolled buildings. This lawless situation cannot continue! And the owners and the City have a duty to ensure that control and order is brought back into thier buildings and society.

I personally believe that it is unfair to place the burden of seeking alternative accomodation for illegal squatters (who have become 'illegal' due to their desperate situation which are exploited by criminal forces) onto the owner of the building. And by placing that burden on the City delays the eviction process which prevents the owner from exercising his right to his property. Very difficult situation indeed.

Those individuals who have been forced to live under the bridge have been exploited by being forced through their circumstances to occupy the dwelling illegally. Them being evicted was inevitable. Personally I place blame on the system which allowed the degradation and exploition to flourish in the first place.
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Last edited by Dynamoe; January 21st, 2014 at 07:37 PM.
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Old January 21st, 2014, 11:31 PM   #1208
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dynamoe View Post
Very old article but explains the parking garage close to the Bree Street Taxi Rank.

Brave new Joburg: Operation Clean Sweep II

24 November 2013
City Press




The City of Johannesburg is preparing for the second leg of Operation Clean Sweep that extends far beyond street traders to target the inner city’s so-called bad buildings, land invaders and shack dwellers.

Demolition gets under way near the Bree Street taxi rank in downtown Joburg as a result of the area being declared a health hazard. Now the City of Johannesburg is determined to develop the area.

The city is proposing the creation of a whole new class of officials who can declare any “building … public road, park, private road or any piece of land of whatever nature” a “problem property”.

ya saw this on my way to last year homeaffairs i'll take some more pics next week it's always been an eyesore, taxis have been moved to opposite the new park near nelson mandela bridge
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Old January 23rd, 2014, 11:46 AM   #1209
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tuIY7oUc2A
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Old January 23rd, 2014, 01:26 PM   #1210
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Has the Impala Fountain that used to be in Oppenheimer Park, but was vandalised and stolen during the 1990s, been recreated? Or do my eyes deceive me?
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Old January 23rd, 2014, 02:06 PM   #1211
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That is a really cool look building! And an awesome flat! Must say those buildings from that view look rather "Bleh".
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Old January 23rd, 2014, 10:55 PM   #1212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caisson Boy View Post
Has the Impala Fountain that used to be in Oppenheimer Park, but was vandalised and stolen during the 1990s, been recreated? Or do my eyes deceive me?
It was restored and moved. More than a decade ago. Oppenheimer Park has also been redeveloped and is an amazing and well-kept little park in the CBD.
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Old January 27th, 2014, 07:25 PM   #1213
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The parkade has been dismantled.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr

Last edited by kulani; January 27th, 2014 at 07:31 PM.
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Old January 27th, 2014, 08:21 PM   #1214
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At the corner of Von Brandis Street & Prichardt street.

image hosted on flickr
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Old January 27th, 2014, 08:25 PM   #1215
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Down Prichard street

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Old January 27th, 2014, 08:33 PM   #1216
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And Edgars Active concept store in Braamfontein

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Old January 27th, 2014, 08:36 PM   #1217
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Another building is going down in Braamfontein

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Old January 28th, 2014, 08:55 PM   #1218
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I currently live in NY and I don't know why but Johannesburg really reminds me of certain areas here in NY. Is there a particular reason for Johannesburg to look like an American city? Who did the planning? The streets, the buildings… I can easily get confused that I am somewhere in the US or Canada.
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Old January 28th, 2014, 09:22 PM   #1219
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I would assumes it's due to the high density and the uniform street grid.
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Old January 28th, 2014, 09:24 PM   #1220
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Any details on any of these upgrades? What is going in the old parking lot's space?
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